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About CCAMLR
 
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The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) was established by international convention in 1982 with the objective of conserving Antarctic marine life. This was in response to increasing commercial interest in Antarctic krill resources, a keystone component of the Antarctic ecosystem. Being responsible for the conservation of Antarctic marine ecosystems, CCAMLR practises an ecosystem-based management approach. This does not exclude harvesting as long as such harvesting is carried out in a sustainable manner and takes account of the effects of fishing on other components of the ecosystem. CCAMLR's contribution to global food security is through its programs of research, monitoring and introduction of conservation measures. CCAMLR is an international commission with 25 Members, and a further 11 countries have acceded to the Convention. Based on the best available scientific information, the Commission agrees a set of conservation measures that determine the use of marine living resources in the Antarctic.
Views: 6186 CCAMLR
CCAMLR 101: How to Protect Antarctica's Marine Life
 
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What is CCAMLR, and how can it protect the penguins, seals, whales, and other animals that live in Antarctica? Our whiteboard animation explains. At the height of the Cold War, countries came together to protect Antarctica as a place of peace and science. Unfortunately, the surrounding waters of the Southern Ocean were not protected. With no protections in place, fishing for tiny krill—the keystone of the Antarctic food web—increased dramatically. In response, the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) was created in 1980. Its mandate was simple: to conserve Antarctic marine life. Despite that mission, promises to create marine reserves and protected areas in Southern Ocean waters have gone unfulfilled, even as climate change and industrial fishing increasingly threaten vulnerable areas such as the Ross Sea. But it isn’t too late to make good. CCAMLR must act now to create marine reserves and show the world that it is serious about protecting the most pristine and special place on the planet. Learn more at www.pewtrusts.org/ccamlr ------------------------------------------------------------------------ TRANSCRIPT Antarctica—the seventh and southernmost continent in the world—is the coldest, driest, and windiest place on earth. It and the surrounding waters of the Southern Ocean are home to more than 9,000 species that aren’t found anywhere else on earth, including leopard seals, orcas, 7 species of penguins…and polar bears… No, not polar bears! That’s the North Pole! Penguins and polar bears have never crossed paths. Antarctica has been called the world’s last frontier. It is a pristine corner of the planet that leaders have long seen value in preserving. In fact, at the height of the Cold War, the world’s leading nations signed the Antarctic Treaty, agreeing to protect the continent of Antarctica as a place of “peace and science.” Penguins and other species were saved! Well, their habitat on land was saved. But what about the waters where they hunted for food? Unfortunately, the entire Southern Ocean was left open to commercial fishing and other exploitation. This spawned a fishing frenzy for Antarctic krill, a tiny shrimp-like crustacean that is processed into animal feed and omega-3 supplements. They may not look like much, but krill form the base of the entire Southern Ocean food web. Without them, penguins and other predators are put at risk. Marine scientists, already worried about the devastating impacts of climate change on Antarctica, raised the alarm when they saw that the krill race was quickly expanding. World leaders responded in 1980 by creating the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, or CCAMLR. CCAMLR’s mandate is to conserve Antarctic marine life. Conserve: to keep something safe from being damaged or destroyed; to use something carefully in order to prevent loss or waste.. But while CCAMLR was responding to interest in krill, another fishing frenzy began—this time, for toothfish, a top predator in the Southern Ocean. Diners called it Chilean sea bass and fishermen called it “white gold” because the catch is highly valuable. Unfortunately, illegal fishing quickly wreaked havoc on populations of this important predator. As demand for krill and toothfish increased, it became clear a new approach was needed. And in 2009, CCAMLR had a bright idea. It designated the first marine protected area in the South Orkney Islands, keeping those waters free from industrial fishing. It was a good start, but they knew they needed to do more. So in 2011, CCAMLR committed to establishing a network of large marine protected areas around the Southern Ocean. It was a big promise that is backed by the best available science. Experts say that we should be designating almost a third of our oceans as highly protected in order to support sustainable, healthy oceans that are resilient to climate change. It’s been four years since CCAMLR’s promise and we are still waiting for this large network of marine protected areas around the Southern Ocean. Today, climate change and industrial fishing continue to threaten vulnerable areas like the Ross Sea, while less than 2% of the world’s oceans are highly protected! At a time when 85 percent of the world’s fisheries are in decline, we know we can do a lot better than that. But is not too late for CCAMLR to make good on their promise and return to their primary mission. Remember what the second “C” stands for? CCAMLR was created to conserve – conserve the Southern Ocean, its krill, penguins, toothfish and other marine life. But CCAMLR must act now to create marine reserves and show the world they mean business about protecting the most pristine and special place on the planet.
Views: 5350 Pew
Bills Committee on Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Bill (2018/10/08)
 
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Bills Committee on Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Bill Meeting on Monday, 8 October 2018 at 2:30 pm in Conference Room 3 of the Legislative Council Complex A G E N D A http://www.legco.gov.hk/yr17-18/english/bc/bc54/agenda/bc5420181008.htm (as at 5.10.2018) I. Meeting with the Administration (2:30 pm - 4:25 pm) Issues raised at the last meeting LC Paper No. CB(2)1906/17-18(01) (issued on 3.8.2018) - List of follow-up actions arising from the discussion at the meeting on 16 July 2018 LC Paper No. CB(2)1976/17-18(01) (issued on 3.9.2018) - Administration's response to issues raised at the meeting on 16 July 2018 LC Paper No. CB(2)1998/17-18(01) (issued on 11.9.2018) - Submission from the Jane Goodall Institute Hong Kong LC Paper No. CB(2)2001/17-18(01) (issued on 13.9.2018) - Assistant Legal Adviser's letter dated 31 August 2018 to the Administration LC Paper No. CB(2)2049/17-18(01) (Chinese version issued on 4.10.2018; English version issued on 2.10.2018) - Administration's reply dated 28 September 2018 to Assistant Legal Adviser's letter of 31 August 2018 LC Paper No. CB(2)2058/17-18(01) (Chinese version attached; English version issued on 4.10.2018) - Assistant Legal Adviser's further letter to the Administration dated 3 October 2018 LC Paper No. CB(2)2058/17-18(02) (to follow) - Administration's reply to Assistant Legal Adviser's further letter of 3 October 2018 Other relevant papers previously issued LC Paper No. CB(3)732/17-18 (issued on 22.6.2018) - The Bill File Ref: FH CR 1/2576/18 (issued in June 2018) - Legislative Council ("LegCo") Brief (A list of other relevant papers previously issued is available on the LegCo website at - http://www.legco.gov.hk/yr17-18/english/bc/bc54/papers/bc54_ppr.htm) II. Any other business (4:25 pm - 4:30 pm)
Bills Committee on Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Bill (2018/11/06)
 
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Bills Committee on Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Bill Meeting on Tuesday, 6 November 2018 at 2:30 pm in Conference Room 3 of the Legislative Council Complex A G E N D A https://www.legco.gov.hk/yr17-18/english/bc/bc54/agenda/bc5420181106.htm (as at 1.11.2018) I. Meeting with the Administration (2:30 pm - 4:25 pm) Issues raised at last meeting LC Paper No. CB(2)46/18-19(01) (issued on 11.10.2018) - List of follow-up actions arising from the discussion at the meeting on 8 October 2018 LC Paper No. CB(2)166/18-19(01) (issued on 31.10.2018) - Administration's response to issues raised at the meeting on 8 October 2018 Clause-by-clause examination of the Bill LC Paper No. CB(3)732/17-18 (issued on 22.6.2018) - The Bill LC Paper No. CB(2)2001/17-18(01) (issued on 13.9.2018) - Assistant Legal Adviser's letter dated 31 August 2018 to the Administration LC Paper No. CB(2)2049/17-18(01) (Chinese version issued on 4.10.2018; English version issued on 2.10.2018) - Administration's reply dated 28 September 2018 to Assistant Legal Adviser's letter of 31 August 2018 LC Paper No. CB(2)2058/17-18(01) (issued on 4.10.2018) - Assistant Legal Adviser's further letter to the Administration dated 3 October 2018 LC Paper No. CB(2)2058/17-18(02) (Chinese version issued on 10.10.2018; English version issued on 5.10.2018) - Administration's reply dated 5 October 2018 to Assistant Legal Adviser's further letter of 3 October 2018 Draft amendments proposed to the Bill Appendix 1 to LC Paper No. CB(2)166/18-19(01) (issued on 31.10.2018) - Draft amendments proposed by the Administration LC Paper No. CB(2)175/18-19(01) (attached) - Marked-up copy of the Bill on the basis of the draft amendments proposed by the Administration prepared by the Legal Service Division (Restricted to members only) (A list of other relevant papers previously issued is available on the LegCo website at - http://www.legco.gov.hk/yr17-18/english/bc/bc54/papers/bc54_ppr.htm) II. Any other business
Council meeting(2019/01/23)Comm of W.Council-Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Bill
 
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II. Bills: Consideration by Committee of the Whole Council- Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Bill Secretary for Food and Health to move amendments (The amendments were issued on 11 January 2019 under LC Paper No. CB(3) 306/18-19) https://www.legco.gov.hk/yr18-19/english/counmtg/agenda/cm20190123.htm
Protecting East Antarctica and the Southern Ocean
 
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In addition to millions of penguins, East Antarctica is home to sea spiders the size of dinner plates, bright jelly fish, and other bottom dwelling sea creatures that make the waters resemble a coral reef. For millions of years, this mosaic of marine life has been kept isolated from the outside world because of circumpolar currents. Unfortunately, concentrated fishing, climate change, and other threats are taking a toll on Antarctica. CCAMLR, the world’s governing body for Southern Ocean conservation, is currently reviewing long overdue protections in the area. Up for consideration are new marine protected areas in East Antarctica, the Weddell Sea, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Learn more about protecting Antarctica’s Southern Ocean: https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/projects/protecting-antarcticas-southern-ocean TRANSCRIPT: Surrounded by icy waters, whipped by wind, this harsh landscape doesn’t seem like a suitable place for life. But tell that to this Adelie penguin or the estimated 6 million others that call East Antarctica home. Or to the legion of emperor penguins lined up for miles across the icy landmass, making their journey to sea. Diving underneath the ice reveals a thriving sea life that reminds us there is so much left of our ocean to explore. And explore is just what these Weddell seals are doing, carving new paths in the icy corridors, shaking the stillness with their song. The deeper you dive, the more diverse life is. Fluid fluttering of jellyfish tendrils give way to a field of sea feathers, where we witness the dogged determination of this large scallop. Dimensions are distorted in the Southern Ocean. A phenomenon called Polar gigantism means that normally small animals are quite large. Like this sea spider the size of a dinner plate. Expectations are challenged too. Familiar looking species are found in an unfamiliar place. Plant-like creatures here are actually animals. And these animals make this part of the Southern Ocean look like a tropical reef. But surprisingly, most of the animals here are found nowhere else on earth. For millions of years, this mosaic of marine life has been kept isolated from the outside world because of circumpolar currents. These powerful currents block warmer waters from entering and prevent Antarctic larvae from leaving the region, creating an environment that is truly one of a kind. And nutrient upwellings from the deep cold bottom waters around Antarctica nourish far away seas. So despite its isolation, we all depend on the Southern Ocean and we all have an impact on it. Climate change, concentrated fishing and other threats are taking a toll on this region, which is one of the fastest warming places on the planet. Climate change here means that ice sheets are changing, increasing the distance between these penguins and their food source, one contributing factor to the massive chick die offs in recent years. Its not just penguins that are in trouble, the southern ocean currents play a role in climate regulation. And disruptions to that that could affect all of us. Its one of the many reasons the world needs to come together to safeguard the Southern Ocean. In 2018, the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources or CCAMLR, is considering three new marine protected areas, including one in the waters surrounding East Antarctica, a step that would help the region build resilience against climate change. The proposal would protect foraging and breeding grounds for these penguins and all other species that call this place home. It would also serve as a critical step toward fulfilling a bold promise CCAMLR made in 2011. To build a network of marine protected areas that will have impacts in this region and beyond. It’s time to make good on that promise. It’s time to protect East Antarctica and the Southern Ocean.
Views: 565 Pew
Bills Committee on Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Bill(2018/07/16)
 
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Bills Committee on Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Bill Meeting on Monday, 16 July 2018 at 2:30 pm in Conference Room 3 of the Legislative Council Complex A G E N D A http://www.legco.gov.hk/yr17-18/english/bc/bc54/agenda/bc5420180716.htm (as at 13 July 2018) I. Election of Chairman (2:30 pm - 2:35 pm) II. Meeting with the Administration (2:35 pm - 4:25 pm) LC Paper No. CB(3)732/17-18 (issued on 22.6.2018) - The Bill File Ref: FH CR 1/2576/18 (issued in June 2018) - Legislative Council ("LegCo") Brief LC Paper No. LS80/17-18 (issued vide LC Paper No. CB(2)1758/17-18 on 5.7.2018) - Legal Service Division Report on the Bill LC Paper No. CB(2)1813/17-18(02) (attached) - Background brief prepared by the LegCo Secretariat III. Any other business
Southern Ocean Management
 
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The Southern Ocean is conserved through the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) which is made up of 24 nations and the European Union. CCAMLR takes an ecosystem approach to the management of Southern Ocean fisheries – which means taking the needs of the ecosystem - including animals such as whales, penguins and sea birds - into account when setting catch limits and putting management arrangements in place
Views: 73 AusAntarctic
East Antarctic Marine Protected Areas
 
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The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) is currently considering the adoption of marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Southern Ocean. There are two proposals before the Commission -- a proposal for a representative system of MPAs in East Antarctica put forward by Australia, France and the European Union and a proposal for an MPA in the Ross Sea put forward by New Zealand and the United States. Both proposals will be considered by CCAMLR at a special meeting in Bremerhaven Germany in July 2013. See http://www.antarctica.gov.au/law-and-treaty/ccamlr/marine-protected-areas for more information.
Views: 1152 AusAntarctic
World's largest marine protected area declared in Antarctica
 
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World's largest marine protected area declared in Antarctica Delegates from 24 countries and the European Union have agreed that the Ross Sea in Antarctica will become the world's largest marine protected area (MPA). Some 1.57 million sq km (600,000 sq miles) of the Southern Ocean will gain protection from fishing for 35 years. Environmentalists have welcomed the move to protect what's said to be the Earth's most pristine marine ecosystem. They believe it will be first of many such zones in international waters. At this meeting in Hobart, Australia, the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) agreed unanimously to designate the Ross Sea as an MPA, after years of protracted negotiations, New Zealand Foreign Minister Murray McCully announced. The Ross Sea, its shelf and slope only comprise 2% of the Southern Ocean but they are home to 38% of the world's Adelie penguins, 30% of the world's Antarctic petrels and around 6% of the world's population of Antarctic minke whales. The region is important to the rest of the planet as the upwelling of nutrients from the deep waters are carried on currents around the world. The Ross Sea is also home to huge numbers of krill, a staple food for species including whales and seals. Their oil is critical for salmon farming. However there are concerns that overfishing and climate change are having significant impacts on their numbers. The proposal, introduced by New Zealand and the US, and accepted by all the other nations, will see a general protection "no-take" zone where nothing can be removed including marine life and minerals. As part of the compromise that emerged in negotiations, there will be special zones where fishing from krill and toothfish will be allowed for research purposes. Speedo diplomacy "I'm absolutely overjoyed," said Lewis Pugh, the UN Patron for the Oceans, and someone who has campaigned for years in support of this new MPA. "This is the biggest protected area on the land or the sea, this is the first large scale MPA on the high seas, they are largely unprotected." The ocean advocate and swimmer drew attention to the Ross Sea with a series of swims in the icy waters - and for two years he has engaged in a series of meetings, dubbed "speedo diplomacy" with Russian officials to convince them of the value of the MPA. https://youtu.be/6S96YAOHIuk Tôi đã tạo video này bằng Trình chỉnh sửa video của YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
Views: 227 Nam Nguyễn
Conserving the unspoiled Weddell Sea in the Antarctic
 
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The Weddell Sea is one of the last pristine areas in the Antarctic, not least because the international fishing fleet has spared this region so far. The European Union submitted a proposal to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) for a marine protected area (MPA) in the Weddell Sea. The scientific background was compiled by experts of the Alfred Wegener Institute, on behalf of the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture. This video shows why it is worthwhile to protect this unique marine region. Copyright: Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany http://www.awi.de/en.html This video was created in cooperation with the agency eventfive GmbH (http://www.eventfive.de) in Bremen, Germany.
🇦🇶Weddell Sea: China, Russia block Antarctic ocean sanctuary plan
 
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The Weddell Sea is considered home to thousands of undiscovered species, and the European Union has been pushing to turn it into an ocean sanctuary. However, consensus eludes the conservation bid as 24 countries in the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources couldn't agree on making it a no-go zone for fishing, mining and drilling. Al Jazeera’s Andrew Thomas has more from Hobart. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 4797 Al Jazeera English
Plans for world's largest ocean sanctuary in Antarctic blocked
 
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Plans for world's largest ocean sanctuary in Antarctic blocked: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/11/03/plans-worlds-largest-ocean-sanctuary-antarctic-blocked/. Thanks for watching, subscribe for more videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9Sa0bRTci0S9pDKStElgmw?sub_confirmation=1     A plan to create the world’s largest marine sanctuary in Antarctic waters was shot down when a key conservation summit failed to reach a consensus, with environmentalists on Saturday decrying a lack of scientific foresight.  Member states of the organisation tasked with overseeing the sustainable exploitation of the Southern Ocean failed at an annual meeting Friday to agree over the a 1.8 million square kilometre (1.1 million square miles) maritime protection zone.  The proposed sanctuary – some five times the size of Germany – would ban fishing in a vast area in the Weddell sea, protecting key species including seals, penguins and whales.  Consensus is needed from all 24 members of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) and the European Union.  But environmental groups say Russia and China – whose concerns over compliance issues and fishing rights have proved key stumbling blocks in the past – along with Norway, played a part in rejecting the plan.  "This was an historic opportunity to create the largest protected area on Earth in the Antarctic: safeguarding wildlife, tackling climate change and improving the health of our global oceans," Greenpeace’s Frida Bengtsson said in a statement on Saturday.  "Twenty-two delegations came here to negotiate in good faith but, instead, serious scientific proposals for urgent marine protection were derailed by interventions which barely engaged with the science and made a mockery of any pretence of real deliberation."  Antarctica is home to penguins, seals, toothfish, whales and huge numbers of krill, a staple food for many species.  They are considered critical for scientists to study how marine ecosystems function and to understand the impacts of climate change on the ocean.  Plans were set out in 2009 to establish a series of marine protected area (MPAs) in the Southern Ocean allowing marine life to migrate between areas for breeding and foraging, but it has been slow going.  The CCAMLR summit, held in each year in Hobart, Australia, was able in 2016 to establish a massive US and New Zealand-backed MPA around the Ross Sea covering an area roughly the size of Britain, Germany and France combined.  As well as the huge Weddell Sea sanctuary, proposals to estbalish two further MPAs in East Antarctica and the Western Antarctic Peninsula were also dashed this year. Together, the three zones would cover close to three million square kilometres.  Andrea Kavanagh, head of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ Antarctic and Southern Ocean work, described the failure to achieve an MPA designation as "discouraging".  "Without an East Antarctic MPA, critical foraging grounds for emperor and Adelie penguins, toothfish, and many other species will not be safeguarded," she said in a statement.  The CCAMLR released a statement saying the new MPAs were the "subject of much discussion" and would be considered again at next year’s meeting.       #Plans, #world, #largest, #ocean, #sanctuary, #Antarctic, #blocked #Wirecopy, #Standard, #WorldNews, #Conservation, #News, #Antarctica, #Environment
Views: 39 Joan Sellers
UK scientists to lead international expedition to huge iceberg recently bred in Antarctic.
 
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UK scientists to lead international expedition to huge iceberg recently bred in Antarctic. Researchers are willing to investigate the seafloor discovered by the trillion-ton block of ice. such companies have discovered new species. The British Antarctic Survey has gained funds to visit the berg and its birthing area in February next year. It will use the actual research vessel James Clark Ross. BAS warns, however, that the final green light will depend on the position of the iceberg at that time and the state of the sea ice in the area. A-68 will have to be well away from the Larsen ice shelf from which it bred, and any sea ice in the upper part of the water will need to be thin enough to allow JCR access. It is fantastic news to have obtained the approval, said the marine biologist of the Foundation, Katrin Linse, who will lead the cruise. The Antarctic ships are usually booked years in advance and for our financiers, Nerc, to give us the opportunity in this emergency grant to go this next season is brilliant. The drifting iceberg, one of the largest ever recorded in Antarctica, is exposing the seabed that probably has not been free of ice cover for 120,000 years, during the peak of the last warm phase of Earth's history known as Eemian. The area has already gained the protection status of the CCAMLR Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources. This gives scientists priority access and keeps commercial fishing at bay for a minimum of two years, but in all probability 10 years.
Views: 19 Science and more
World's largest marine park created in Antarctic Ocean
 
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Twenty-four countries and the European Union agreed on Friday to create the world's largest marine park in the Antarctic Ocean, covering a massive 1.55 million square km (600,000 square miles) of ocean. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, meeting in Hobart, Australia, said the Ross Sea marine park would be protected from commercial fishing for 35 years. The Ross Sea is seen as one of the world's most ecologically important oceans. The sanctuary will cover more than 12 percent of the Southern Ocean, which is home to more than 10,000 species including most of the world's penguins, whales, seabirds, colossal squid and Antarctic tooth fish. Fishing will be banned completely in 1.1 million square km (425,000 square miles) of the Ross Sea, while areas designated as research zones will allow for some fishing for krill and sawfish. Scientists and activists described the agreement as a historic milestone in global efforts to protect marine diversity. "The Ross Sea Region MPA will safeguard one of the last unspoiled ocean wilderness areas on the planet – home to unparalleled marine biodiversity and thriving communities of penguins, seals, whales, seabirds, and fish," U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said in a statement, referring to the marine park authority. Scientists said the marine park would also allow a greater understanding of the impact of climate change. Russia agreed to the proposal, after blocking conservation proposals on five previous occasions. The 25-member commission, which includes Russia, China, the United States and the European Union, requires unanimous support for decisions. "They all have diverse economic, political interests and to get them all to align - especially in the context of there are divergent economic interests - is quite a challenge," Evan Bloom, director at the U.S. Department of State and leader of the U.S. delegation, told Reuters.
Views: 24 BroadcastAgency
Penguins starving in East Antarctica: behind the BBC news headlines
 
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Adelie penguin chicks are starving in the second bad season within five years. Only two chicks survived in an Eastern Antarctic colony this year. Polar expert and cameraman, Doug Allan, explains more with his own footage of Adelie penguins and observations on how the polar regions are being changed through man-made alterations to our climate. A protection proposal is being discussed on Monday 16th October by the 25 members of the Commission for Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) and the European Union. Doug gives further background on the plight of the Adelie penguins in greater detail than on the news.
Views: 1142 Indoona
Day One — Antarctic Mural in Hobart for CCAMLR
 
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The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition has commissioned local artist TOPSK to paint a mural in Hobart’s city centre during the 37th meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The mural will highlight the importance of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean by depicting a rich and vibrant Antarctic ocean ecosystem featuring emperor penguins, Antarctic krill, a leopard seal, a humpback whale, a colossal squid, and the species-rich Antarctic seafloor. Painting will begin on Monday 22 October at 1pm and the mural will be officially unveiled at an event on Wednesday 31 October at 12:45 pm.
Antarctic Wildlife Mural in Hobart by TOPSK
 
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The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition has commissioned local artist TOPSK to paint a mural in Hobart’s city centre during the 37th meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The mural will highlight the importance of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean by depicting a rich and vibrant Antarctic ocean ecosystem featuring emperor penguins, Antarctic krill, a leopard seal, a humpback whale, a colossal squid, and the species-rich Antarctic seafloor. Read more: www.asoc.org/mural
Researchers just found a bizarre 'headless chicken monster' swimming deep in the Antarctic Ocean
 
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A "headless chicken monster" was spotted swimming in the Antarctic Ocean, Australian researchers announced Sunday. The bizarre creature that does indeed look like it's missing a head is actually a sea cucumber scientifically known as Enypniastes eximia. As if looking like a headless chicken wasn't enough, it also has a webbed veil and a transparent body that shows its internal organs. The "monster" is also extremely active for a deep sea creature, and can measure up to 9-inches, past research has shown. It was previously filmed in the Gulf of Mexico, and now the Australian Government announced researchers with the Australian Antarctic Division captured clear video of this odd sea cucumber flapping its veil and appearing to feed or crawl using its tentacles across the ocean floor. This is the first time the headless chicken monster has been sighted in southern ocean waters, the Australian government noted in a release. “The Southern Ocean is home to an incredible abundance and variety of marine life, including commercially sought-after species, the harvesting of which must be carefully managed for future generations,” Gillian Slocum, Australia’s Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources Commissioner, said in a statement. Australian researchers were able to capture the rare sight using new technology attached to toothfish longlines. “Some of the footage we are getting back from the cameras is breathtaking, including species we have never seen in this part of the world," said Dirk Welsford, Australian Antarctic Division Program Leader. The collected images and data, which will be presented at the annual CCAMLR meeting this week, will also show what areas of the ocean might be adversely affected by fishing, Welsford said.
Views: 24 Bla Bla 1
Southern Ocean Sanctuaries: Protecting the World’s Final Ocean Frontier
 
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The Southern Ocean—the waters surrounding Antarctica—is the one of the last untouched wilderness areas on the planet. But a warming climate and increased fishing pressures put this vast area and its iconic species such as penguins, whales, and seals at risk. The solution: fulfilling the promise by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) to create a network of marine protected areas that will safeguard the world’s final ocean frontier—before it’s too late. For more information about the Southern Ocean encircling Antarctica and conservation efforts to establish an MPA network to protect it, visit http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/collections/2017/10/more-antarctic-marine-protections-needed-at-ccamlr *TRANSCRIPT* Encircling the icy continent of Antarctica is the most pristine of all marine habitats—the great Southern Ocean. Looking down on this ocean, the sheer beauty and power of the natural world is overwhelming. This is our last ocean frontier. Over 9,000 species that can’t be found anywhere else in the world call this place home. Even species that don’t live here depend on it. Strong Antarctic currents carry deep sea nutrients to faraway oceans—sustaining three quarters of the world’s marine life. As remote as it is, the Southern Ocean is under increasing pressure. It’s one of the fastest warming places on the earth. And there is a growing interest in commercial fishing in this area. The strain is becoming visible. We have the power to protect this ocean. It can be done and in fact, it’s already begun. In 2016, 24 countries and the European Union made history by creating the largest marine protected area on the planet in the Ross Sea. These countries are members of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, or CCAMLR. Their visionary decision to protect the Ross Sea was praised around the globe. But CCAMLR also made an even more important promise, one that will have a bigger impact. They agreed to establish a network of large-scale marine protected areas throughout the Southern Ocean, including in the Weddell Sea, East Antarctica, and the Antarctica Peninsula. These protected areas would connect ecosystems, supporting marine animals that migrate between them as they forage and breed. And the benefits of these reserves will spread well beyond their boundaries. Our planet is changing, and never has this region been more fragile or important than it is today. Protecting the Ross Sea was only the beginning. It’s time for CCAMLR to deliver on its word by working steadily toward a network of marine reserves that will safeguard the world’s final ocean frontier before it’s too late.
Views: 2269 Pew
Day Two — Antarctic Mural in Hobart for CCAMLR
 
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The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition has commissioned local artist TOPSK to paint a mural in Hobart’s city centre during the 37th meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The mural will highlight the importance of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean by depicting a rich and vibrant Antarctic ocean ecosystem featuring emperor penguins, Antarctic krill, a leopard seal, a humpback whale, a colossal squid, and the species-rich Antarctic seafloor. Painting will begin on Monday 22 October at 1pm and the mural will be officially unveiled at an event on Wednesday 31 October at 12:45 pm.
Day Three — Antarctic Mural in Hobart for CCAMLR
 
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The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition has commissioned local artist TOPSK to paint a mural in Hobart’s city centre during the 37th meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The mural will highlight the importance of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean by depicting a rich and vibrant Antarctic ocean ecosystem featuring emperor penguins, Antarctic krill, a leopard seal, a humpback whale, a colossal squid, and the species-rich Antarctic seafloor. Painting will begin on Monday 22 October at 1pm and the mural will be officially unveiled at an event on Wednesday 31 October at 12:45 pm.
FAO Award Winner Monde Mayekiso (CCAMLR)
 
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The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) is selected for its exemplary conservation and management of marine living resources in the Convention Area (the Southern Ocean covering around 10% of the Earth’s surface) in line with the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. The Commission’s sustainable ecosystem-sensitive approach balances environmental conservation with the rational utilization of resources and acts as a model for similar initiatives, with great potential to be replicated by other Regional Fishery Bodies. Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=FAOoftheUN Follow #UNFAO on social media! * Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/UNFAO * Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+UNFAO * Instagram - https://instagram.com/unfao/ * LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/fao * Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/faoknowledge © FAO: http://www.fao.org
Day Five — Antarctic Mural in Hobart for CCAMLR
 
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The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition has commissioned local artist TOPSK to paint a mural in Hobart’s city centre during the 37th meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The mural will highlight the importance of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean by depicting a rich and vibrant Antarctic ocean ecosystem featuring emperor penguins, Antarctic krill, a leopard seal, a humpback whale, a colossal squid, and the species-rich Antarctic seafloor. Painting will begin on Monday 22 October at 1pm and the mural will be officially unveiled at an event on Wednesday 31 October at 12:45 pm.
Day Six — Antarctic Mural in Hobart for CCAMLR
 
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The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition has commissioned local artist TOPSK to paint a mural in Hobart’s city centre during the 37th meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The mural will highlight the importance of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean by depicting a rich and vibrant Antarctic ocean ecosystem featuring emperor penguins, Antarctic krill, a leopard seal, a humpback whale, a colossal squid, and the species-rich Antarctic seafloor. Painting will begin on Monday 22 October at 1pm and the mural will be officially unveiled at an event on Wednesday 31 October at 12:45 pm.
Day Eight — Antarctic Mural in Hobart for CCAMLR
 
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The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition has commissioned local artist TOPSK to paint a mural in Hobart’s city centre during the 37th meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The mural will highlight the importance of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean by depicting a rich and vibrant Antarctic ocean ecosystem featuring emperor penguins, Antarctic krill, a leopard seal, a humpback whale, a colossal squid, and the species-rich Antarctic seafloor. Painting will begin on Monday 22 October at 1pm and the mural will be officially unveiled at an event on Wednesday 31 October at 12:45 pm.
Day Seven — Antarctic Mural in Hobart for CCAMLR
 
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The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition has commissioned local artist TOPSK to paint a mural in Hobart’s city centre during the 37th meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The mural will highlight the importance of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean by depicting a rich and vibrant Antarctic ocean ecosystem featuring emperor penguins, Antarctic krill, a leopard seal, a humpback whale, a colossal squid, and the species-rich Antarctic seafloor. Painting will begin on Monday 22 October at 1pm and the mural will be officially unveiled at an event on Wednesday 31 October at 12:45 pm.
Day Four — Antarctic Mural in Hobart for CCAMLR
 
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The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition has commissioned local artist TOPSK to paint a mural in Hobart’s city centre during the 37th meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The mural will highlight the importance of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean by depicting a rich and vibrant Antarctic ocean ecosystem featuring emperor penguins, Antarctic krill, a leopard seal, a humpback whale, a colossal squid, and the species-rich Antarctic seafloor. Painting will begin on Monday 22 October at 1pm and the mural will be officially unveiled at an event on Wednesday 31 October at 12:45 pm.
World's largest marine park created in Ross Sea in Antarctic Ocean
 
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The European Union together with a further 24 countries agreed on Friday to create the world's largest marine park in the Antarctic Ocean. The Commission for Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources sealed the deal at an annual meeting in Hobart, Tasmania following years of negotiations. A protected area will be established in the Ross Sea, which is regarded as one of the world's most ecologically important areas of ocean. Subscribe to us on Youtube: https://goo.gl/lP12gA Download for IOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cctvnews-app/id922456579?l=zh&ls=1&mt=8 Download for Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.imib.cctv Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cctvnewschina Twitter: https://twitter.com/CCTVNEWS Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CCTVNEWSbeijing Tumblr: http://cctvnews.tumblr.com/ Weibo: http://weibo.com/cctvnewsbeijing
Views: 793 CGTN
Australia's Antarctic strategic interests in the 21st century
 
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Australia asserts sovereignty to 42% of the Antarctic continent and has a long involvement in Antarctic exploration and science. Australia also has important economic and environmental interests in the Great Southern Ocean. We are an original signatory to the Antarctic Treaty which, among other things, establishes all that part of the globe below 60 degrees South as a region free of military conflict and nuclear arms. While Australia has been a leading player in Antarctic affairs for more than a century, Australian leadership should not be taken for granted as new countries emerge as significant participants in the Antarctic treaty System. This NSC public seminar will explore the emerging issues in Antarctica and their implications for the Antarctic Treaty System and for Australia’s Antarctic policy. Dr Tony Press is the Chief Investigator for the Australian Government’s 20 Year Australian Antarctic Strategic Plan and Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania. Until July this year, he was the CEO of the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre in Hobart. Prior to that, from 1998 to 2008, he was the Director of the Australian Antarctic Division, Australia’s Commissioner to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, the Australian Delegate for the Antarctic Treaty and the Australian Representative to the Committee on Environmental Protection (as well as its Chair from 2002 to 2006). Dr Press has had a long career in public administration and has a particular interest in the links between science and policy. The National Security College is a joint initiative of the Commonwealth Government and ANU.
Views: 1693 ANU TV
Antarctic sanctuary: Gillian Anderson to present 300.000 signatures to government
 
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Antarctic sanctuary: Gillian Anderson to present 300.000 signatures to government The proposed area in the Weddell Sea is seven times the size of the UK and would be the world's first Antarctic Ocean Sanctuary. Actress and oceans campaigner Gillian Anderson has presented a petition signed by more than 300,000 people calling for a huge part of Antarctica to become protected. The proposed area in the Weddell Sea is seven times the size of the UK and would become the world's first Antarctic Ocean Sanctuary. The petition, delivered to the Foreign Office, has been signed by two million people worldwide. The size of the area makes this the most ambitious of several proposals on a protected marine area to be agreed later this month in Australia by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The sanctuary could be as large as 1.11m square miles (1.8m square km) and would be off-limits from human activity. As well as providing a safe haven for penguins, whales and seals, it would allow wildlife and the ecosystem that supports it to recover from climate change, pollution and over-fishing. The proposed measure would also preserve a huge carbon sink, a natural system that sucks up and stores carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The Antarctic is one of the oceans' most important carbon stores. The plan was given a huge boost in July when the krill fishing industry voluntarily agreed to stop fishing in the areas covered by the proposed marine sanctuary. Four small vulnerable ecosystems in the Antarctic Ocean have already been designated as protected, following a three-month expedition which found both new species and plastic and hazardous chemicals.
Views: 55 News News
Conservationists push for Antarctic reserve
 
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Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe A high-level Antarctic conservation meeting has been launched to consider proposals on declaring swathes of the continent's surrounding Southern Ocean as "marine protected areas", in order to protect thousands of polar species. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, comprised of delegations from 24 countries and the European Union, officially started talks in the Australian city of Hobart on Tuesday. The region is home to big populations of penguins, seals and whales found nowhere else in the world, and also has unique seafloor features that nurture early links in the food chain, according to environmental groups. If the proposals are adopted, there would be fishing bans or restrictions for millions of square kilometres of ocean and ice. Al Jazeera's Andrew Thomas reports from Hobart. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 871 Al Jazeera English
Massive marine park declared in Antarctic Ocean
 
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The world's biggest marine park is to be be created in the Antarctic Ocean, covering a massive 1.55 million square kilometers, after a "momentous" agreement was finally reached by 24 countries and the EU. The deal, sealed on Friday in Hobart, Australia, after years of negotiations and with Russia dropping its long-help opposition, will see a massive US and New Zealand-backed marine protected area established in the Ross Sea. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources said the Ross Sea marine park would be protected from commercial fishing for 35 years. The marine park will cover an area roughly the size of Britain, Germany and France combined - of which 1.12 million square kilometres will be a no-fishing zone. The sanctuary will cover more than 12 percent of the Southern Ocean, which is home to more than 10,000 species including most of the world's penguins, whales, seabirds, colossal squid and Antarctic tooth fish. Scientists and activists described the agreement as a historic milestone in global efforts to protect marine diversity. "The Ross Sea Region MPA will safeguard one of the last unspoiled ocean wilderness areas on the planet - home to unparalleled marine biodiversity and thriving communities of penguins, seals, whales, seabirds, and fish," US Secretary of State John Kerry said in a statement, referring to the marine park authority. Moscow was the last government opposing the move, largely due to concerns over fishing rights, after China offered its support last year. Antarctica is the part of the world least touched by people. Its isolation also makes it an excellent place for research. "It is one of the last places on earth that has an entire eco-system intact, including its top predators," Andrea Kavanagh of the PEW Charitable Trust told Al Jazeera. "Therefore, scientists are able to use that as a baseline to look at how healthy eco-systems are affected by climate change." Scientists said the marine park would also allow a greater understanding of the impact of climate change. Russia agreed to the proposal, after blocking conservation proposals on five previous occasions. The 25-member commission, which includes Russia, China, the US and the EU, requires unanimous support for decisions. "They all have diverse economic, political interests and to get them all to align - especially in the context of there are divergent economic interests - is quite a challenge," Evan Bloom, director at the US Department of State and leader of the US delegation, told the Reuters news agency. While the Ross Sea plan got the go-ahead, time ran out at the meeting to reach agreement on a second proposed protected area - the Australia and France-led East Antarctica sanctuary covering another one million square kilometre zone. A third German-proposed plan is also in the works to protect the Weddell Sea, which extends from the southeast of South America over an area of some 2.8 million square kilometres.
Views: 35 BroadcastAgency
SKETCHY ANTARCTICA LAWS: Prohibits MlLlTARY ACTIVITY Except In SUPPORT Of SCIENCE
 
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✔Preparing for a populous future in which Antarctica — the world’s only continent without countries and citizens — may see more tourists, over-exploited fisheries, disputes and crime, India is drafting a dedicated Antarctica policy and a law that will likely be tabled in the winter session of Parliament. ✔Ministry of Earth Sciences officials tasked with drafting the law said that India, being among the countries that have acceded to the Antarctica Treaty, is expected to have a clear policy on the consequences of its activities in the region. ✔The treaty is framed to ensure ‘in the interests of all mankind that Antarctica shall continue forever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes and shall not become the scene or object of international discord.’ ✔To this end it prohibits military activity, except in support of science; prohibits nuclεar explσsions and the disposal of nuclεar waste; promotes scientific research and the exchange of data; and holds all territorial claims in abeyance. Many pacts for region ✔Several related conventions, such as the Conservation of Antarctic Seals (1972) and the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (1980), are appended to this treaty for protection. However, these laws also mean that conventional concepts such as territories and jurisdicti- ons do not hold good here. ✔India is expanding its infrastructure development in Antarctica. The government is rebuilding its station, Maitri, to make it bigger and last for at least 30 years. Dakshin Gangotri, the first Indian base established in 1984, has weakened and become just a supply base. A committee that includes Biman Patel, Vice-Chancellor, Gujarat National Law University, has been asked to draft the new ‘Antarctica law.’ ✔M. Ravichandran, Director, National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research, said clear laws are necessary on a wide range of matters, including “domestic disputes between residents.” South Africa and Australia have specific laws. ARTICLE: https://www.google.com/amp/www.thehindu.com/news/national/a-law-this-time-for-antarctica/article19128630.ece/amp/ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★    🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷🇱🇷 ❤❤SUPPORT MY CHANNEL & WORK HERE⤵❤❤           https://www.patreon/JamesMunder ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ ✔NEWS, ✔LAUGHS & A Couple Other Things...   Trying To Figure Out What's Really Going On ✔
Views: 2061 James Munder
Cytoplan: The health benefits of Red Krill Oil
 
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This short animation explains the health benefits of taking a Krill Oil supplement. The public awareness of krill oil supplements has been substantially elevated over (say) the past five years. Not only does krill oil provide good natural levels of Omega 3 EFA’s EPA and DHA it also has a number of additional natural nutritional attributes that are explained in this short video. Cytoplan's suppliers are committed to maintaining the sustainability of Krill within the strict guidelines of CCAMLR (The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources)
Views: 460 Cytoplan
Progress on establishing protected areas in the Southern Ocean: the Ross Sea region MPA
 
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This webinar originally aired on 1 December 2016. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) has been working to establish marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean, which would contribute to its objective – the conservation of Antarctic marine living resources. Two proposals have been under consideration since 2012, MPAs in the Ross Sea Region and East Antarctica. An overview and the latest updates on CCAMLR’s MPA efforts will be provided during the webinar. See CCAMLR's webpage for background on CCAMLR MPAs: https://www.ccamlr.org/en/science/marine-protected-areas-mpas. This webinar was presented by Mi Ae Kim of NOAA, and it was co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network.
Views: 59 OpenChannels
Conference with Andrew Wright, Executive Director, CCAMLR
 
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"Ecosystem based management implemented in the Commission for the Conservation of Antartic Marine Living Resources - CCAMLR"
Antarctic Reserves Would Protect Penguins, Double World's Protected Oceans | Pew
 
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A multinational meeting failed to designate vitally needed marine reserves in Antarctica's Ross Sea. http://www.pewenvironment.org/southernocean. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Andrea Kavanagh with The Pew Charitable Trusts discuss the importance of these dazzling seas, among the last pristine marine areas in the world and our healthiest penguin habitat. This meeting of 24 countries and the European Union was a third attempt by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, or CCAMLF, to protect large areas in the Southern Ocean. The proposals will be reconsidered at CCAMLR's 2014 annual meeting next October.
Views: 212 Pew
Bob Barker Intercepts the Thunder in the Southern Ocean
 
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December 17, 2014 - The Sea Shepherd conservation ship, Bob Barker, intercepted the illegal fishing vessel Thunder inside the CCAMLR (Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources) region of management. ---- Sea Shepherd is an international, non-profit marine conservation organization that engages in direct action campaigns to defend wildlife, and conserve and protect the world’s oceans from illegal exploitation and environmental destruction. Learn more about us: https://www.seashepherdglobal.org/ Support our efforts: https://www.seashepherdglobal.org/donate/
Views: 18248 Sea Shepherd
ANTARCTICA'S "OFF LIMITS" ZONES; EU ENFORCED: SCIENTISTS ONLY & 2X SIZE OF TEXAS
 
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TIP: KSMALL ✔In a groundbreaking agreement between 24 different countries and the European Union, the world’s largest marine reserve will be established in Antarctica’s Ross Sea. ✔The meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources that took place in Hobart, Australia on Friday finally agreed to designate 600,000 square miles as a zone protected from harmful human activity – that’s twice the area of Texas. ✔72% of the marine protected area will be a ‘no-take’ zone, which forbids all fishing, while other sections will permit some harvesting of fish and krill for scientific research. The sanctuary will also provide a valuable control space for researchers to compare the ecosystems of Antarctic waters with human interference to those without ✔Since the location is a popular commercial fishing spot for Chinα and Russiα, the agreement is a long-awaited victory in environmental preservation and political harmony. ✔“This has been an incredibly complex negotiation which has required a number of Member countries bringing their hopes and concerns to the table at six annual CCAMLR meetings as well as at intersessional workshops,” says CCAMLR Executive Secretary, Andrew Wright. ✔“This decision represents an almost unprecedented level of international cooperation regarding a large marine ecosystem comprising important benthic and pelagic habitats. It has been well worth the wait because there is now agreement among all Members that this is the right thing to do and they will all work towards the [marine protected area’s] successful implementation,” he said. ✔Though the sanctuary’s protection won’t go into full effect until December 2017, the polar ‘Garden of Eden’ is home to the richest collection of wildlife whose survival will benefit greatly from the agreement. https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/nations-unite-create-worlds-largest-marine-reserve-antarctica/ 🐬🐬🐬😂🤓🤓🤓🌞☄☄☄😎😎😎🐳🐶🐶🐶🐇⛳⛳⛳🙏🙏🙏😲😲😲😨😨😨👱👱👱❤❤❤ DON'T YOU JUST LOVE MY SUPER AWESOME CHANNEL? THIS IS THE ONLY PLACE ON THE ENTIRE INTERNET YOU CAN SEE MY MASTERPIECES OF DIVINATION! SPONSOR MY INSPECTIONS OF THE MASTERMIND MAINSTREAM MEDIA & TOGETHER, WE WILL TRAVEL THROUGH THE RABBITHOLE INTO OZ, UNMASK THE VILLAINS IN OUR MAGICAL MYSTERY MACHINE & STRlKE WHEN THEY LEAST EXPECT US— LIKE A PACK OF FURIOUS VELOCIRAPTORS! WE ARE THOSE MEDDLING KIDS THAT WON'T LET YOU GET AWAY WITH IT! ! 👷👦👱👧🐕🐿 Support My Channel & Work Here: https://www.patreon/JamesMunder
Views: 1217 James Munder
CCAMLR
 
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The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) was established by international convention in 1982 with the objective of conserving Antarctic marine life. This was in response to increasing commercial interest in Antarctic krill resources, a keystone component of the Antarctic ecosystem. CCAMLR is an international commission with 25 Members, and a further 10 countries have acceded to the Convention. Based on the best available scientific information, the Commission agrees a set of conservation measures that determine the use of marine living resources in the Antarctic.
Views: 373 LastOceanNZ
Krill connections: Is Hobart the krill capital of the world?
 
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This presentation was held at CCAMLR Headquarters, Hobart, Australia during the 2017 National Science Week. Is Hobart the krill capital of the world? Watch to find out. Guest speakers: Dr So Kawaguchi (Australian Antarctic Division - http://www.antarctica.gov.au/) Dr Keith Reid (CCAMLR Secretariat - https://www.ccamlr.org/) Dr Laura Laslett (Menzies - http://www.menzies.utas.edu.au/) A National Science Week public seminar to help people understand the connections between commercially available krill products, human health claims and the biology and ecology of this tiny crustacean. Find out why Hobart is the global centre of krill science and krill fishery management and how each of the relevant institutions are connected through international scientific and government networks. Dr So Kawaguchi from Australian Antarctic Division talked about his research on krill biology and ecology and Dr Laura Laslett from the University of Tasmania’s Menzies Institute for Medical Research discussed her research on the medicinal value of krill oil. Science Manager for the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), Dr Keith Reid, outlined how fishing for krill is regulated by this international body and how fishing limits are informed by the best available scientific studies on krill and their ecosystems.
Views: 1505 CCAMLR
Breaking News  - Drive for giant new marine sanctuary in Antarctica
 
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Australia and France kick off a fresh push Monday to create a vast marine sanctuary in pristine East Antarctica, hoping to build on the success of a landmark deal secured last year at a key annual conservation summit.The fate of the plan to shield critical areas of ocean around the frozen continent rests with the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), which meets in Hobart, Tasmania until October 27.In a major breakthrough, agreement was reached in 2016 to establish the world's largest reserve after Russia dropped its long-held opposition over fishing rights.The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) is a treaty tasked with overseeing conservation and sustainable exploitation of the Antarctic Ocean, also known as the Southern Ocean. Consensus is needed from all 24 member countries and the European Union to agree to protect certain areas.  Australia and France kick off a fresh push Monday to create a vast marine sanctuary in East Antarctica comprising three zones - MacRobertson, Drygalski, and the D'Urville Sea-Mertz region. D'Urville would be a no-catch zone, which WWF said would aid a stricken Adélie penguin colony near the French Antarctic research station there. Mass starvation wiped out thousands of chicks in the colony this year, with unusually thick sea ice linked to the break up of the Mertz glacier forcing their parents to forage further for food. Only two survived.That earlier deal saw a massive US and New Zealand-backed marine protected area (MPA) around the Ross Sea, covering more than 1.55 million square kilometers (600,000 square miles) - roughly the size of Britain, Germany and France combined.A large part of it will be a no-fishing zone with the protection taking effect from December 1, the result of years of pressure by conservationists.But time ran out to seal agreement on a second proposed protected area - the Australia and France-led East Antarctica sanctuary covering another one million square kilometer zone.'Designating an MPA in East Antarctica this year would significantly move the needle toward a full MPA network by 2020,' said Andrea Kavanagh, director of The Pew Charitable Trusts' Antarctic and Southern Ocean work.Plans were set out in 2009 to establish a series of MPAs in the Southern Ocean allowing marine life to migrate between areas for breeding and foraging.But it has been slow going, with the main stumbling blocks around fishing rights and Russia and China stymying progress in the past.A third German-backed plan is also in the works to protect the Weddell Sea, which extends from the southeast of South America over some 2.8 million square kilometers.But it has been sent back for amendments and will not be a main agenda item this year.However, a proposal for a fourth zone of 94,000 square kilometers around the Western Antarctic Peninsula is set to be presented by Argentina and Chile, conservationists told AFP.CCAMLR is a treaty tasked with overseeing conservation and sustainable exploitation of the Antarctic Ocean, also known as the Southern Ocean.Consensus is needed from all 24 member countries and the European Union.Antarctica is home to penguins, seals, Antarctic toothfish, whales and huge numbers of krill, a staple food for many species.They are considered critical for scientists to study how marine ecosystems function and to understand the impacts of climate change on the ocean.The East Antarctica plan originally comprised s1
Views: 27 US Sciencetech
'Headless chicken sea monster' - BBC News
 
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A deep-sea swimming sea cucumber has been filmed in the Southern Ocean off East Antarctica for the first time. Real name Enypniastes eximia, commonly known as the "headless chicken sea monster", the creature had previously only been filmed in the Gulf of Mexico. Data from the underwater cameras will be fed back to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, the international body managing the Southern Ocean. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog
Views: 36861 BBC News
Adelie penguins suffers catastrophic breeding season in Antartica
 
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A colony of more than 18,000 pairs of Adelie penguins in Antarctica suffered a catastrophic breeding season with just two chicks surviving, experts have said. The disaster for the colony in Terre Adelie in East Antarctica was down to unusually extensive sea ice late in the summer – despite low ice early in the season – which meant penguins had to travel further for food and the chicks starved. In the wake of the “devastating” event, conservation group WWF is calling for greater protection for the waters off East Antarctica to ensure penguins do not face added pressure of competition from fishing fleets for their main food source of krill. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources(CCAMLR), made up 25 member states and the EU, are meeting on Monday to consider a proposal for a new marine protected area for the waters off East Antarctica. A marine protected area, which would prevent krill fishing, would help to secure a future for the wildlife of East Antarctica, including Adelie and emperor penguins, WWF said. Adelie penguins are generally faring well in East Antarctica, but declining in the Antarctic peninsula region where climate change is already established, the conservation group said. But the same colony which failed to breed chicks this year, failed to produce a single chick four years ago from 20,196 adult pairs, with heavy sea ice combining with unusually warm weather and rain followed by a drop in temperature leaving many chicks saturated and freezing to death. WWF has been supporting penguin research by French scientists working for the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in the region since 2010.
Views: 50 nmtvindia
Weddell Sea Expedition Hangout #2 | Dr. John Shears and Knowledge Bengu
 
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Dr. Shears will be leading the expedition. He is a polar geographer and environmental scientist with over 25 years’ experience of working in both Antarctica and the Arctic, first with the British Antarctic Survey, then as the Treasurer of the Scott Polar Research Institute at the University of Cambridge. John was an adviser to the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Polar Regions Department and was the UK delegate to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) Scientific Committee for more than twenty years. Dr. Shears was also a UK Antarctic Treaty Inspector in 2005, 2012 and 2015, and the environmental adviser to and member of, the Shackleton Crossing Expedition to South Georgia in 2016. John is a long-standing Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and has worked closely with the RGS on many polar education and expedition projects for more than a decade. Captain Knowledge Bengu has been to some of the most remote places on the planet, faced wild oceans and shouldered a huge responsibility. An experienced ice pilot, he will be in command of the South African ice breaker as it steers its way through the treacherous southern oceans on this mission of science and discovery.
US wants Antarctic deal with Russia (sic)
 
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U.S. wants an agreement with Russia on Antarctica. After repeated failed attempts to establish an Antarctic Ocean sanctuary, the United States is hopeful it can sway Russia to agree to a plan that would protect a vast swath of what marine scientists call the most pristine body of water left on Earth. Source: Reuters Transcript: The fate of the most pristine ocean left on Earth and the thousands of species that call it home -- hang in the balance. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources or CCAMLR is currently meeting… the goal - to agree a deal to conserve the Southern Ocean and manage its marine ecosystems. While the commission is supposed to base its decisions on science, political tensions and commercial fishing interests may prove the ultimate decider - that's according to new research from Stanford University. The commission is currently negotiating Marine Protected Areas - or MPAs - that amount to at least 12 percent of the Southern Ocean, home to more than 10,000 species including most of the world's penguins and whales. (SOUNDBITE) (English) CASSANDRA BROOKS, PHD CANDIDATE, STANFORD UNIVERSITY, SAYING: "Beyond resource interests, international geopolitics and tensions in other parts of the world are acting as a barrier to the MPA process." (SOUNDBITE) (English) ROBERT DUNBAR, PROFESSOR OF EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE, STANFORD UNIVERSITY, SAYING: "There is a lot of tensions in the South China Seas, there is a lot of tensions between the U.S. and Russia and the Middle East and these tensions all add up." Add up to increased difficulties in coming to agreements on MPAs. Russia has already blocked conservation proposals five consecutive times, while all other delegates to the commission made of 24 nations and the European Union supported revised proposals to create MPAs in Antarctic waters. But Evan Bloom, the head of the U.S. delegation to CCAMPLR, says he's hopeful Russia can be swayed this year. (SOUNDBITE) (English) EVAN BLOOM, DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OF OCEAN AND POLAR AFFAIRS AT THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND HEAD OF U.S. DELEGATION TO CCAMLR MEETING, SAYING: "We hope to bring Russia on board. We are talking with them in a positive way." (SOUNDBITE) (English) EVAN BLOOM, DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OF OCEAN AND POLAR AFFAIRS AT THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND HEAD OF U.S. DELEGATION TO CCAMLR MEETING, SAYING: "Science can trump politics and we find that CCAMLR has the ability to make decisions that are focused on the ecosystem and scientific results. We think that can happen here." Campaigners believe any agreement, even one with many compromises, is an important step towards protecting the Southern Ocean.
Views: 100 Civil Disturbia
Breaking News  - First footage of Antarctic iceberg the size of Delaware
 
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Scientists have released the first-ever footage of 'A-68', a trillion-ton iceberg the size of Delaware that has broken off from Antarctica.Stunning aerial clips capture the huge crack in Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf that led to the third largest iceberg ever recorded breaking off from the continent last July.When A-68 separated from Larsen C, it revealed an ocean hidden under the ice shelf for 120,000 years, and a team of scientists are now studying the region to uncover some of the hidden ecosystem's mysteries.Led by the Cambridge-based British Antarctic Survey (BAS), the group will study tiny animals, microbes and plankton on the seafloor to see how they cope with severe changes to their environment.As part of preliminary research for the trip, the team have taken aerial footage of the iceberg to monitor how far it has drifted to sea - the very first video captured of the berg since it calved from Larsen C last year.Marine biologist Dr Katrin Linse, the BAS researcher leading the mission, said: 'The calving of A-68 provides us with a unique opportunity study marine life as it responds to a dramatic environmental change.'It's important we get there quickly before the undersea environment changes as sunlight enters the water and new species begin to colonise.'We've put together a team with a wide range of scientific skills so that we can collect as much information as possible in a short time. It's very exciting.'The scientists are travelling by ship to collect samples from the newly exposed seabed, which covers an area of around 2,250 square miles (5,800 square kilometres).The team says their mission is urgent because the ecosystem that's likely hidden beneath the ice for thousands of years may change as sunlight starts to alter the surface layers of the sea.The team will investigate the area previously under the ice shelf by collecting seafloor animals, microbes, plankton, sediments and water samples using a range of equipment including video cameras and a special sledge pulled along the seafloor to collect tiny animals.They will also record any marine mammals and birds that might have moved into the area. Their findings will provide a picture of what life under the ice shelf was like so changes to the ecosystem can be tracked.A-68 is 620 feet (190 meters) thick from top to bottom, with just 100 feet (30 meters) of it is visible above the ocean.The iceberg was formed by a single crack along Larsen C, its parent ice shelf, and makes up a little over 10 per cent of the shelf.BAS researchers flew around the iceberg to get a better view of it as it drifts into the Weddell sea.This newly exposed marine area is the first to benefit from an international agreement made in 2016 by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR).This agreement designates Special Areas for Scientific Study in newly exposed marine areas following the collapse or retreat of ice shelves across the Antarctic Peninsula region.The agreement AutoNews- Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5396605/First-footage-Antarctic-iceberg-size-Delaware.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
Views: 114 US Sciencetech
Penguins di* in 'cat*strophic' Antarctic breeding season
 
01:46
Penguins di* in 'cat*strophic' Antarctic breeding season #Like Our Fanspage Click here : https://facebook.com/UknewsTV17 #Follow Our Twitter, click here : https://twitter.com/Uknews_TV #Visit Our Blog, click here : https://goo.gl/5RCnaq All but two Adelie penguin chicks have starved to death in their east Antarctic colony, in a breeding season described as "catastrophic" by experts. It was caused by unusually high amounts of ice late in the season, meaning adults had to travel further for food. It is the second bad season in five years after no chicks survived in 2015. Conservation groups are calling for urgent action on a new marine protection area in the east Antarctic to protect the colony of about 36,000. WWF says a ban on krill fishing in the area would eliminate their competition and help to secure the survival of Antarctic species, including the Adelie penguins WWF have been supporting research with French scientists in the region monitoring penguin numbers since 2010. The protection proposal will be discussed at a meeting on Monday of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The Commission is made up of the 25 members and the European Union. "This devastating event contrasts with the image that many people might have of penguins," Rod Downie, Head of Polar Programmes at WWF, said. "The risk of opening up this area to exploratory krill fisheries, which would compete with the Adelie penguins for food as they recover from two catastrophic breeding failures in four years, is unthinkable. "So CCAMLR needs to act now by adopting a new Marine Protected Area for the waters off east Antarctica, to protect the home of the penguins."
Views: 27 Uknews TV
Море Росса станет крупнейшей в мире заповедной зоной
 
00:55
Представители 24 стран подписали план создания природоохранной зоны площадью более полутора миллионов квадратных километров. Детали договора, который предложили США и Новая Зеландия, обговаривали несколько лет. Речь идёт о море Росса. Уастники договора называют его экологически важной акваторией планеты. Там живут тысячи видов крупных живых существ — от пингвинов до гигантских кальмаров. Рыболовство и охота будут полностью запрещены — за исключением научных исследований, разрешение на которые будет даваться в индивидуальном порядке. Эти правила вступят в силу в декабре следующего года и будут действовать 35 лет. #RossSea, #mpa, #UnitedNations #Ecology #ЭкоNEWS #WorldNEWS #НОВОСТИ _______________________________ After years of negotiations, twenty-four countries have agreed to create the world’s largest marine park in the Antarctic Ocean. Meeting in Hobart, the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources said the 1.55 million square kilometre Ross Sea marine park would be protected from commercial fishing for three to five years. Scientists say the marine park will also allow a greater understanding of the impact of climate change. #RossSea, #mpa, #Antarctic #UnitedNations #Ecology #ЭкоNEWS #WorldNEWS #НОВОСТИ ОФИЦИАЛЬНЫЙ САЙТ: http://www.mediaholding100.com/ ON-LINE ТЕЛЕВИДЕНИЕ: http://www.televidenie.tv/ ОФИЦИАЛЬНЫЙ YOUTUBE-канал: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFivdAEZMXtm623yu69GRqA FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/HOTNEWS.TV/ https://www.facebook.com/MEDIAHOLDING100.WORLD/ https://www.facebook.com/TVONT/
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