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Corporate Bonds
 
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Build your investment knowledge about corporate bonds and why they are issued, along with the different risks and benefits that are involved with secured and unsecured corporate bonds. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 56105 Zions TV
Bond Investing : Why Do Companies Issue Bonds?
 
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Companies issue bonds to raise money to buy equipment, to retool, to remodel buildings and to expand. Find out when a person can expect to get their money back from a company-issued bond with help from a licensed financial planner in this free video on bonds and investing. Expert: William Rae Contact: www.hbwfl.com Bio: William Rae has been licensed in the insurance and financial fields for more than 30 years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Views: 1897 ehowfinance
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 548196 Khan Academy
Bond Issuance Examples
 
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Roger Philipp, CPA, CGMA, presents a basic bond issue with a face value of $1 million, term of 5 years, and stated or coupon rate of 8% in the video 11.01 - Bond Issuance Examples. He also shows the journal entries for issuance and interest payments at market rates or effective rates of 8%, then 10%, and then 6%. If the bond is issued to yield 8%, then the bond is issued at par and interest expense will equal the interest payment. If the effective interest rate is 10% then the bond is issued at a discount. Now interest expense will no longer equal the cash coupon interest paid. Roger explains how to set up the journal entry, keeping things simple for now with straight-line amortization of the bond discount. Roger continues the problem by showing in the journal entry how the issuer’s interest expense will equal the market rate of 10%. Finally, Roger walks through the journal entries for this 8% face rate bond issued at a premium with a yield of 6%. As an advanced bonus, Roger has us consider the effects of the bond interest payments on the statement of cash flows. Connect with us: Website: https://www.rogercpareview.com Blog: https://www.rogercpareview.com/blog Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RogerCPAReview Twitter: https://twitter.com/rogercpareview LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/roger-cpa-review Are you accounting faculty looking for FREE CPA Exam resources in the classroom? Visit our Professor Resource Center: https://www.rogercpareview.com/professor-resource-center/ Video Transcript Sneak Peek: Now, next page it says issuance of bonds example and we're going to go through this example. Face value of the bonds, million dollars. Term, five year versus what? Term versus serial bond which matures in installments. Stated interest rate 8%. That's how much cash I'm going to get. I'm going to get 8% of a million dollars or $80,000 in cash but what am I earning? That's a different question. Then it says effective or market or yield is eight in example A, ten in example B, six in example C. Notice that we're going to be doing three examples. One is going to be eight, eight which is issued at par, issued at face. We don't have to worry about the discounted premium then we'll go to a discount example, then we'll go to a premium example and then life will be beautiful for you, things will make sense.
Views: 28650 Roger CPA Review
How to Issue a Bond
 
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Understand how to raise capital by issuing a bond and follow us on linkedin for more information https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/18099116/
Views: 573 lcg legal services
Intro to the Bond Market
 
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Most borrowers borrow through banks. But established and reputable institutions can also borrow from a different intermediary: the bond market. That’s the topic of this video. We’ll discuss what a bond is, what it does, how it’s rated, and what those ratings ultimately mean. First, though: what’s a bond? It’s essentially an IOU. A bond details who owes what, and when debt repayment will be made. Unlike stocks, bond ownership doesn’t mean owning part of a firm. It simply means being owed a specific sum, which will be paid back at a promised time. Some bonds also entitle holders to “coupon payments,” which are regular installments paid out on a schedule. Now—what does a bond do? Like stocks, bonds help raise money. Companies and governments issue bonds to finance new ventures. The ROI from these ventures, can then be used to repay bond holders. Speaking of repayments, borrowing through the bond market may mean better terms than borrowing from banks. This is especially the case for highly-rated bonds. But what determines a bond’s rating? Bond ratings are issued by agencies like Standard and Poor’s. A rating reflects the default risk of the institution issuing a bond. “Default risk” is the risk that a bond issuer may be unable to make payments when they come due. The higher the issuer’s default risk, the lower the rating of a bond. A lower rating means lenders will demand higher interest before providing money. For lenders, higher ratings mean a safer investment. And for borrowers (the bond issuers), a higher rating means paying a lower interest on debt. That said, there are other nuances to the bond market—things like the “crowding out” effect, as well as the effect of collateral on a bond’s interest rate. These are things we’ll leave you to discover in the video. Happy learning! Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/29Q2f7d Next video: http://bit.ly/29WhXgC Office Hours video: http://bit.ly/29R04Ba Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/QZ06/
Bonds vs. stocks | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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The difference between a bond and a stock. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/shorting-stock/v/basic-shorting?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/stocks-intro-tutorial/v/what-it-means-to-buy-a-company-s-stock?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Many people own stocks, but, unfortunately, most of them don't really understand what they own. This tutorial will keep you from being one of those people (not keep you from owning stock, but keep you from being ignorant about your investments). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 916098 Khan Academy
Explanation: Bond Discounts
 
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This video will help you understand why companies issue bonds at a discount. We will not go over any calculations in this video.
Views: 4160 Accounting Videos
Stock dilution | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why the value per share does not really get diluted when more shares are issued in a secondary offering. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/mergers-acquisitions/v/acquisitions-with-shares?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/chapter-11-bankruptcy-restructuring?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: When companies issue new shares, many people consider this a share "dilution"--implying that the value of each share has been "watered down" a bit. This tutorial walks through the mechanics and why--assuming management isn't doing something stupid--the shares might not be diluted at all. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 103201 Khan Academy
Capital Raising Process (Underwriting)
 
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In investment banking, underwriting is the process where a bank raises capital for a client (corporation, institution, or government) from investors in the form of equity or debt securities. Click here to learn more about this topic: https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/finance/underwriting-overview/
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 563536 Khan Academy
8 Difference Between Stock And Bond
 
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1. Stocks, or shares of stock, represent an ownership interest in a corporation. Bonds are a form of long-term debt in which the issuing corporation promises to pay the principal amount at a specific date. 2. Bonds are less risky than stocks. 3. Stocks pay dividends to the owners. Bonds pay interest to the bondholders. 4. Bonds are issued by public sector authorities, credit institutions, companies and supranational institutions. Stock are issued by corporation or joint-stock companies. 5. Is the return guaranteed? Stock: No Bond: Yes 6. Stockholders are the owners of the company. Bondholders are the lenders to the company. 7. Add on benefits Stock: The holders get voting rights. Bond: The holders get preference at the time of repayment. 8. Bonds markets, unlike stock or share markets, often do not have a centralized exchange or trading system. Stock or share markets, have a centralized exchange or trading system.
Views: 1773 Patel Vidhu
What Are Bonds and How Do They Work?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Bonds” Bonds are a type of loan made by a lender to a borrower. They are issued by governments, supranational organizations and companies for a predetermined period of time referred to as the 'term' after which the loan should be repaid or 'redeemed' in full. Interest is usually paid twice yearly to bondholders at a fixed rate known as the 'coupon'. Unlike bank loans, bonds are traded on recognized exchanges. Just as people need money, so do companies and governments. A company needs funds to expand into new markets, while governments need money for everything from infrastructure to social programs. The problem large organizations run into is that they typically need far more money than the average bank can provide. The solution is to raise money by issuing bonds (or other debt instruments) to a public market. Thousands of investors then each lend a portion of the capital needed. Really, a bond is nothing more than a loan for which you are the lender. The organization that sells a bond is known as the issuer. You can think of a bond as an IOU given by a borrower or the issuer to a lender the investor. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
Five Steps to Understanding a $38 Trillion Bond Market
 
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In providing litigation services to clients, it's very important that our attorneys have a good understanding of the $38 trillion dollar bond market. In this video, New Jersey forensic accountant Robert A. Bonavito explains the bond market and how it works. Companies and governments issue bonds and people buy those bonds with a stated interest rate. For example, if the government issues you a bond with a 5% interest rate on an airport they are building, it may be worth a face value of $1,000. But what does the government get who issued the bond? They get trillions of dollars to build the airport, knowing that the airport is going to have to pay this 5% fee. However, if you want to sell this bond and interest rates in the markets aren't 5%, things get a little more complicated. You don't want to give someone a bond that has a 5% interest rate on a $1,000 bond if the market rate is only 4% or less. Therefore you would raise the price of your bond to $1,100. This will make the yield go down, and that will be the new effective rate. If you look at the bond market, people are willing to pay the yield for the bond. Depending on what you want to do and fluctuations within the market, you may have to ask for more or less. For more information, please visit our website: http://www.rabcpafirm.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_content=sETeT_YdX_4 Robert A. Bonavito, CPA 1812 Front St. Scotch Plains, NJ 07076 908-322-7719 http://www.rabcpafirm.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_content=sETeT_YdX_4
How bonds work
 
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Investing can sometimes seem like either like a gamble or very dull. At the "gambling" end of the spectrum are shares, with the possibility of swift ups in price and swift drops in price. At the other end is cash in the bank -- a predictable investment with few changes day-to-day or month-on-month. Investors looking for a middle ground and looking to diversify do have other options. They can consider bonds. Bonds are something of a mystery to many people -- perhaps because they are not often talked about. But bonds can play an important role in managing investments. They can be a half way house between the risk of shares and property and the safety of cash. How do bonds work? At the most basic level, a bond is a loan. Or, more technically, it is a large loan that has been split into packages and sold to investors. Bond holders typically make money by receiving regular payments of interest (known as coupons) during the life of the loan. When the loan ends, their original investment is returned. Bonds may have lives of just a year or two or for 10, 20 or even 30 years. You can buy individual bonds or opt for units in a bond fund run by an asset manager. Like shares, bonds or bond funds can usually be sold at any time and the value of your investment may rise or fall. But bond prices usually move less than shares. That is why they are considered safer than shares but they are more risky than a bank deposit. The original investment and the coupon payments are secure for bonds, while with shares, there is no guarantee of receiving dividend payments -- or your original investment. Looking a bit more closely, there are two main types of bonds -- corporate bonds and government bonds. Corporate bonds are loans made by companies. Government bonds are loans made by governments. Corporate bonds are more risky because the company issuing the bond may go bankrupt. In bankruptcy, though, bond holders are paid before shareholders. Governments rarely go bankrupt so government bonds are safer than corporate bonds. And the lower interest rate on government bonds reflects this. Getting more technical, different types of bonds are designed to work in different financial conditions. In particular, index-linked bonds pay coupons and the original investment in a way that compensates for inflation. The can be attractive to investors who want to ensure the value of their investment does not fall if prices rise. Bonds don't have to be part of your investment portfolio. Some people are happy to invest exclusively in shares and property but if you want to spread your investment risk, if you want to diversify, remember that there is always a half way house in bonds.
Views: 90513 ING eZonomics
The mechanics of a bond offering  Process description
 
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What is Investment Banking Investment banking is a specific division of banking related to the creation of capital for other companies, governments and other entities. Investment banks underwrite new debt and equity securities for all types of corporations, aid in the sale of securities, and help to facilitate mergers and acquisitions, reorganizations and broker trades for both institutions and private investors. Investment banks also provide guidance to issuers regarding the issue and placement of stock. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_H8SEcfTAXlt5mHfRTDdNoivaUagZC87
Views: 262 The Course
English To Khmer # 86- CSX urges companies to issue bonds
 
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Local companies were recently asked to get in contact with the Cambodia Securities Exchange (CSX) if they are interested in issuing bonds. “We would like to inform members, participants and the public that they can contact us directly for any application to issue bonds,” CSX’s announcement said. To get new videos, please subscribe our Channel below http://bit.ly/2t6GVjH Follow me: Facebook Page: www.Facebook.com/English2Khmer Google Plus: http://bit.ly/2ssrKzm LinkedIn: http://bit.ly/2sgAKsW Twitter: http://bit.ly/2smuwLw Instagram: http://bit.ly/2t6WJTR
Views: 25 Khmer Learning TV
Company Accounts||Issue of Shares [#1]Introductions||Issue of Shares at Par||Premium||Discount
 
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Introduction to Company accounts or Introduction to corporate accounts with an example problem. In this video we discussed about What is Authorised capital, Issued capital, unissued capital, Called up capital, uncalled up capital, Paid up capital, Subscribed capital, Calls in arrears, Reserve capital. Terms of Issues: Issue of shares at par, Premium and Discount To watch more tutorials pls visit: www.youtube.com/c/kauserwise * Financial Accounts * Corporate accounts * Cost and Management accounts * Operations Research Playlists: For Financial accounting - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLabr9RWfBcnojfVAucCUHGmcAay_1ov46 For Cost and Management accounting - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLabr9RWfBcnpgUjlVR-znIRMFVF0A_aaA For Corporate accounting - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLabr9RWfBcnorJc6lonRWP4b39sZgUEhx For Operations Research - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLabr9RWfBcnoLyXr4Y7MzmHSu3bDjLvhu
Views: 309198 Kauser Wise
Investment Banking Areas Explained: Capital Markets
 
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Capital markets are one of the most fascinating areas of investment banking. Companies need these services when they are about to go public or want to issue debt sold to the public. When a company wants to raise equity, we talk about ECM, standing for Equity Capital Markets, and when it wants to raise debt, we talk about DCM, standing for Debt Capital Markets. On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/365careers/ On the web: http://www.365careers.com/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/365careers Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/365careers
Views: 120769 365 Careers
What it means to buy a company's stock | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a company's stock. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/stocks-intro-tutorial/v/bonds-vs-stocks?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Many people own stocks, but, unfortunately, most of them don't really understand what they own. This tutorial will keep you from being one of those people (not keep you from owning stock, but keep you from being ignorant about your investments). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 562433 Khan Academy
Raising money for a startup | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Raising money from an angel investor. Pre-money and post-money valuation. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/getting-a-seed-round-from-a-vc?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/valuation-and-investing/v/ebitda?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: This is an old set of videos, but if you put up with Sal's messy handwriting (it has since improved) and spotty sound, there is a lot to be learned here. In particular, this tutorial walks through starting, financing and taking public a company (and even talks about what happens if it has trouble paying its debts). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 556902 Khan Academy
Stock Market : Why Does a Company Issue Stocks?
 
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A company issues stocks in order to raise money so that they can grow and work on new projects or products. Discover why people buy stocks to share in the risk of a company's dream with help from a licensed financial planner in this free video on the stock market and investing. Expert: William Rae Contact: www.hbwfl.com Bio: William Rae has been licensed in the insurance and financial fields for more than 30 years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Views: 1944 ehowfinance
What Is The Bonds Payable?
 
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Commonly used by government agencies and corporations to represent a issuing long term bonds represents an important source of financing for many large companies. Issuing bonds payable & long term notes bond investopedia. The corporation issuing the bond is borrowing money from an investor who becomes a lender and bondholder. You might think of a bond as an iou issued by corporation and purchased investor for cash. The issuer of bonds makes formal promises to pay interest usually every six months (semiannually) and the principal or maturity amount at a specified date many years in future are form long term debt. Googleusercontent search. Bonds payable are a form of long term debt. Company accountants list bonds payable as a long term liability 26 dec 2010 when company issues bonds, investors may pay more than the face value of stated interest rate on exceeds bond falls into securities category. Generally a long term liability account containing the face amount, par or maturity amount of bonds issued by company that are payable financial instruments representing company's commitment to pay back specified sum owner instrument in time unlike notes payable, which normally represent an owed one lender, large number at same different bond is promise series payments over and fixed. The principal or face amount on the bond's maturity date bonds payable. Bonds payable? What are bonds Accountingcoachaccountingcoachexamples accounting explainedaccounting for payable principlesofaccounting. Accountingcoach accountingcoach blog what are bonds payable url? Q webcache. What is bonds payable? Definition and meaning investor wordsbonds payable accounting in focus. Bonds payable are promissory notes issued by a business to obtain new borrowings. It's a contract between the bond issuer and bondholder. Rather than go to a bank or other lender, company will issue bonds and sell them 18 nov 2015. Interest to be paid each period is definition of bonds payable that are issued as payment for long term debt. This transaction is recorded as a credit on the balance sheet market price of bonds payable. Bonds are issued by corporations, hospitals, and governments. Why would bonds payable appear on the consolidated balance chapter 2. Valuing bonds payable dummies. Bonds payable balance sheet classification the amortization of premium on bonds accountingtools. Accounting for bonds payable requires present value definition of the amount due on a bond when it reaches maturity date. Bonds allow larger loans to be obtained using multiple investors after 10 or 20 years, the company must pay back for their investment with interest. Bonds payable video #1 basic bonds entries youtubedouble entry bookkeeping. Key concept] price of bonds present value principal interest payments. Issuing bonds payable & long term notes payable, advantages disadvantages of par value bond certificates a is debt investment in which an investor loans money to entity (typically corporate or governmental) borr
Views: 63 new sparky
Methods of Issue of Shares
 
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A basic understanding about the methods by which a company can issue its shares as per Companies Act , 2013 or the methods by which the shares can be obtained by a person !!
Views: 28154 unknown
Acquisitions with shares | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Mechanics of a share-based acquisition. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/mergers-acquisitions/v/price-behavior-after-announced-acquisition?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/dilution-tutorial/v/stock-dilution?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Companies often buy or merge with other companies using shares (which is sometimes less intuitive than when they use cash). This tutorial walks through the mechanics of how this happens and details what is likely to happen in the public markets because of the transaction (including opportunities for arbitrage). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 75176 Khan Academy
Financial Accounting: Bond Prices (Premiums) & Corporations (Paid-in Capital & the Balance Sheet)
 
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Introduction to Financial Accounting Bond Prices : Premiums (Chapter 11) Corporations: Paid-in Capital & the Balance Sheet (Chapter 12) April 22nd, 2013 by Professor Victoria Chiu The Professor begins this lecture by reviewing (and completing) the journal entries involved in the issuance of bonds at a premium. She also talks about the conceptual reasons as to why companies would issue bonds at a premium. Bonds are mainly issued at a premium when the company is doing very well and is expected to do better in the future, thus they deem the bonds they issue worth more than their standard face value. She also walks the class through a problem involving recording the journal entries of the issuance of bonds at a premium as well as the amortization of the premium and the recognition of interest earned during the time. Following this, the Professor moves on to discuss the journal entries involved in adjusting for bonds payable. This involves instances where the bonds are issued in the middle of the year rather than the beginning of the year (January). This obviously affects the accrual and payment of interest. After this, the Professor displays an illustration of a balance sheet that emphasizes how current and long term liabilities are recorded on it. Examples of current liabilities shown are accounts payable, employee income tax payable, FICA tax payable, employee benefits payable, sales tax payable, unearned service revenue, and more. Following this, the Professor goes over several multiple-choice exercises to conclude the chapter before moving on to chapter 12 - paid-in capital and the balance sheet. The Professor begins the chapter by going over the basics of stockholder's equity. Paid-in capital (contributed capital) is amount that is acquired from stockholders (essentially, externally generated). The main source of paid-in capital is the issuance of common stock. Retained earnings, on the other hand, is capital that is internally generated. It is the result of profitable operations. It is net income that the company decides to keep for use within the company. Following this, the Professor goes over key terms within the corporate organization: -----Authorization is the state's permission for a given corporation (within that state) to operate. -----Authorized stock is the maximum amount of shares that a corporation is allowed to issue. -----Capital stock is defined as the individual ownership of a corporation's capital. -----Stock certificates are papers that prove that a stockholder has ownership within the corporation (essentially, they prove that the stockholders are actually stockholders). -----Stock certificates normally show basic information about the company, the stockholder's name and the number of shares issued. -----Outstanding stock is stock that is currently being held by stockholders. The Professor also differentiates between the two classes of stock - Common Stock and Preferred Stock. Common stockholders have the right to vote in company related decisions (normally, the strength of their voting power is proportionate to the number of shares they hold). Common stockholders can also receive a dividend (although it is not guaranteed - if the company is not doing well it may not give any). The Professor reviews the rights of preferred stockholders and explains the concept of stock with par vs. stock without par (no-par) before closing the lecture. ------QUICK NAVIGATION------ Video Begins with Issuing Bonds Payable at Premium (Journal Entry and Ledger Focused) Bonds Payable at Premium (Balance Sheet Presentation): 7:10 Exercise S11-8: Journalizing Bond Transactions: 17:07 Exercise S11-8 Solution Review: 22:56 Adjusting Entries for Bonds Payable: 32:33 Liabilities on Balance Sheet: 42:08 Multiple Choice Exercises: 45:49 NEW TOPIC BEGINS HERE: CHAPTER 12: Corporations: Paid-in Capital & the Balance Sheet: 58:49 Stockholder's Equity Basics: 58:24 Classes of Stock: 1:07:07 Par & No-par Stock: 1:11:17 To receive additional updates regarding our library please subscribe to our mailing list using the following link: http://rbx.business.rutgers.edu/subscribe.html
Basics of Stocks and Bonds
 
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ZACH DE GREGORIO, CPA www.WolvesAndFinance.com An overview of Stocks and Bonds. Stocks and Bonds are a type of asset class. An asset class is a category of investments with similar characteristics. The video walks through an example of how stocks and bonds are used in practice. In the example a company wants to raise money. A company develops a business case to build a new factory for $500M. They can raise money in the financial markets by issuing stocks and bonds. Stocks are an ownership interest in the company. The video describes Market Capitalization. You calculate Market Capitalization using the current stock price to determine the current perceived value of the company. Bonds are debt issued by the company. Bonds can also be traded in the market and whoever holds the bond receives the interest payment. The main difference between stocks and bonds is that stocks are riskier than bonds. Bonds are set payment amounts. Stocks, on the other hand, are not a set payment. Dividend payments in stocks are based on whether a company makes profits. This allows you to participate in the upside or downside of the company. The other reason stocks are riskier than bonds is that in bankruptcy, bondholders get priority over stockholders. The reason why the differences between stocks and bonds are important is for managing investment portfolios. Your goal in portfolio management is to manage the risk of the portfolio, which you can achieve by managing the percentages of stocks versus bonds. One last point covered in the video discusses tax implications. For example, at the time of the shooting of this video there are different rates for short term capital gains versus long term capital gains for individuals. It is important to contact a tax professional to understand the implications of your investments. Neither Zach De Gregorio or Wolves and Finance Inc. shall be liable for any damages related to information in this video. It is recommended you contact a CPA in your area for business advice.
Views: 1240 WolvesAndFinance
Credit risk in bonds
 
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Credit risk in bonds I've tried to emphasize interest rate risk when you invest in bonds because many people don't understand this risk even though it's probably the biggest risk facing today's bond investor. But almost everyone understands credit risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuing company or government can't meet the promised interest or principal payments. US Treasuries face least credit risk In this case, US Treasury bonds and mortgage securities called Ginnie Maes offer the highest credit ratings. These securities are backed by the "full faith and credit" of the US government. Government agency securities After US Treasuries and Ginnie Maes come debt issued by quasi-governmental agencies like the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation also known as Freddie Mac. Although debt issued by these corporations does not carry the explicit backing of the US government, most bond traders believe the government will back up the companies if their bankruptcy is threatened. Blue chip corporations Next comes the debt of large, blue chip corporations like General Electric. This debt is normally called investment grade debt. Debt issued by large corporations is normally rated by independent companies like Moody's, and Standard & Poors. These companies do extensive research into the issuing company's ability to repay their bonds. Hierarchy of claims Before we jump further down into junk bonds, we should spend a little time talking about the hierarchy of claims on a company's assets and see what happens if a company files or is forced into bankruptcy. According to the US Constitution, bankruptcy proceedings are handled by federal law. US bankruptcy laws were rewritten in 1978 to change the traditional pecking order of those who can make claims against a bankrupt company. Lawyers and the IRS are highest Highest on the pecking order is the bankruptcy lawyers. Lawyers write the laws, so it shouldn't be too surprising that they want to get paid for their efforts as they try to dole out the company's assets. Next comes the IRS, then the firm's employees and their pension funds. After them come the company's secured creditors. These creditors have loaned the company money, but the loan is secured by a mortgage on a piece of real property like a building or heavy equipment. Most blue chip debt is unsecured Although secured debt is common for smaller companies, the majority of blue chip corporate debt is unsecured debentures. Here the lender only has the promise that the firm will honor its debt. This is similar to unsecured credit card debt that most consumers carry. However, there are several levels of unsecured debt. So-called senior debt holders are paid off before junior or subordinated debt holders. Unsecured creditors also include the suppliers who provided the company with merchandise. After the junior debt holders come the preferred stockholders. Finally, if there's any money left, the common stockholders receive compensation for their ownership in the company. Chapter 11 and 7 bankruptcy There are two forms of corporate bankruptcy, named for sections in the federal law which govern their policies. One is Chapter 11, and this type appears in the news most often. In this case, the company continues operation, but it receives a temporary reprieve from its creditors while it works out a debt repayment plan. The second is Chapter 7. In this more extreme case, the company is liquidated and assets are sold off to satisfy creditors. A company can be forced into bankruptcy by its creditors if the company fails to meet its obligations. The company also voluntarily can choose to file for bankruptcy. Once in bankruptcy, a federal court plays a major role in the handling of claims. Typical bankruptcy reorganization Although it's difficult to generalize about bankruptcy proceedings, if a company files for bankruptcy, and then later re-emerges as an operating company, the old creditors and shareholders have their claims shifted down one level in the claims hierarchy. For example, the old senior debt holders become junior creditors, the old junior debt holders become stockholders and the old stockholders lose everything or perhaps get some equity warrants. Ratio analysis for credit worthiness To avoid the unpleasantness of bankruptcy, bond investors and independent rating agencies analyze a company's financial condition. Typically, investors look at various ratios to see if the firm is a good risk. One of the most common ratios is the firm's current ratio. Current ratio Times interest earned ratio Debt to equity ratio Copyright 1997 by David Luhman
Views: 1052 MoneyHop.com
How To Sell Stocks In Your Company To Raise Money? https://3wayfunding.com/
 
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https://3wayfunding.com/business-credit-optin 1-888-883-3013 Selling to Large Private Investors Companies do not have to go public to attract investment dollars from institutions. While there are limits on the extent to which a company may solicit investors without filing with the SEC (and abiding by certain rules, regulations and laws), it is considerably easier, faster and cheaper to sell shares on a private basis. These sales not only offer the same advantage of raising capital, but the presence of large and well-respected investors can open doors to companies and bring access to future funding, customers and employees. Other ways to sell stock in your business to raise money Selling to Smaller Investors Selling to Employees Franchising Stock Swap http://BusinessCreditAmerica.com
Views: 4008 HOUSTON MCMILLER
Russia - Issue of international bond
 
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T/I: 11:29:00 Russia on Thursday (21/11) issued its first international bond since the 1917 October Revolution, raising a billion dollars on the global markets through a five-year Eurobond. The historic issue had been expected since the beginning of this year. But it was twice the size expected by financial experts. The huge size of Russia's external debt had prevented the bond issue until now, but the country has practically resolved its obligations towards both commercial and state creditors. SHOWS: MOSCOW, RUSSIA 21/11 00.00 WS central moscow 00.04 WS interior brunswick securities trading room 00.10 MS workers at terminals 00.15 CU trading board 00.19 SOT loren bough, brunswick securities stockbroker: "i think that will have long term beneficial effects in that it will allow more russian sovereign debt be issued onto the international markets, and also allows the possibility that there'll be future issuance from corporates, from corporate issuance in the bond market." 00.33 SOT boris fyodorov, former finance minister: "i consider this just the first step in attracting private capital, because it will be much more interesting to see russian banks, russian companies, issuing securities rather than the state - that would be really a market economy." 00.46 MS nightshot financial centre 00.50 WS nightshot financial centre 00.56 VISION ENDS You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/deb160721a5c46575bda57c37d39178c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 71 AP Archive
Accounting 2 - ACCT 122 - Program #214 - Issuing Bonds at a Discount
 
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Accounting 2 - ACCT 122 - Program #214 - Issuing Bonds at a Discount
Views: 14663 JCCCvideo
WHAT IS THE PROCEDURE TO ISSUE THE BONDS
 
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Mr. Jyoti Prakash Gadia (Managing Director Resurgent India Limited) sharing his views on "WHAT IS THE PROCEDURE TO ISSUE THE BONDS" at Zee Business.
What is Warrant?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Warrant” Corporations may issue warrants that allow you to buy a company's stock at a fixed price during a specific period of time, often 10 or 15 years, though sometimes there is no expiration date. Warrants are generally issued as an incentive to investors to accept bonds or preferred stocks that will be paying a lower rate of interest or dividends than would otherwise be paid. How attractive the warrants are — and so how effective they are as an incentive to purchase — generally depends on the growth potential of the issuing company. The brighter the outlook, the more attractive the warrant becomes. When a warrant is issued, the exercise price is above the current market price. For example, a warrant on a stock currently trading at $15 a share might guarantee you the right to buy the stock at $30 a share within the next 10 years. If the price goes above $30, you can exercise, or use, your warrant to purchase the stock, and either hold it in your portfolio or resell at a profit. If the price of the stock falls over the life of the warrant, however, the warrant becomes worthless. Warrants are listed with a "wt" following the stock symbol and traded independently of the underlying stock. For example, if you own warrants to purchase a stock at $30 a share that is currently trading for $40 a share, your warrants would theoretically be worth a minimum of $10 a share, or their intrinsic value. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
Issuing Bonds in Israel Subs
 
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foreign real estate companies raise unsecured debt by issuing bonds in the Israeli capital market
Views: 46 eyal meichor
What Is A Corporate Bond?
 
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Corporate bonds in india finance and banking mondaq. Corporate bond wikipedia. Interest is subject to 1 jun 2016 if the need for a deep corporate bond market was desirable, india's aspiration and plans take up large infrastructure projects across looking an investment vehicle that provides predictable interest payments manageable level of risk? Find out bonds are you 13 nov 2013. After government bonds, the corporate bond market is largest section of global universe. A new route to investing direct in 18 dec 2015 read about the pros and cons of corporate bonds. Corporate bonds are debt instruments created by companies for the purpose of raising capital. The backing for the bond is usually payment ability of company, which typically money to be earned from future operations. In some cases, the company's physical assets may be used as collateral for bonds a corporate bond is issued by corporation in order to raise financing variety of reasons such ongoing operations, m&a, or expand business. Corporate bonds a guide to investing corporate fidelity investments. A corporate bond is a debt security issued by corporation and sold to investors. What is a corporate bond? . Corporate bond definition & example corporate bonds definition, type and size of market the balance. With a vast array of maturities, yields and credit quality 2 corporate bonds etfs invest in debt issued by corporations with investment grade ratings. Know your debt funds what is corporate bond fund? Livemint. Corporate bond investopedia terms c corporatebond. Companies issue corporate bonds to raise money for a variety of purposes, such the sec's office investor education and advocacy is issuing this bulletin offer basic information about. Visit asic's moneysmart website for more information and a check list to help you decide if corporate bonds are debt obligations issued by corporations fund capital improvements, expansions, refinancing, or acquisitions. Corporate bond market time to look beyond bank borrowings for what is a corporate types, rates, and how buyunderstanding bonds top 73 etfs. Corporate bond wikipediacorporate wikipedia. What determines their the interest payments you receive from corporate bonds are taxable. About corporate bonds nse national stock exchange of india ltd what are bonds? Sec. Corporate bond fund debt funds icici prudential. Googleusercontent search. They are called fixed income securities because they pay a 17 dec 2016 corporate bonds type of loan to corporation. India finance and banking frankfurt, june 21 around 12 percent of corporate bonds held by the european central bank have been bought at negative yields over half all. Bonds included in these funds can feature aims to provide opportunity invest the steadily developing corporate bond segment india which is likely offer attractive risk reward prospects 18 mar 2013 bonds are issued by private or public sector companies order borrow from market. Unlike stocks, bonds do not give you an ownership inte
Views: 18 new sparky
The four different types of bonds
 
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What is Investment Banking Investment banking is a specific division of banking related to the creation of capital for other companies, governments and other entities. Investment banks underwrite new debt and equity securities for all types of corporations, aid in the sale of securities, and help to facilitate mergers and acquisitions, reorganizations and broker trades for both institutions and private investors. Investment banks also provide guidance to issuers regarding the issue and placement of stock. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_H8SEcfTAXlt5mHfRTDdNoivaUagZC87
Views: 177 The Course
High(?) Yield Bonds
 
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Dennis McCarthy - (213) 222-8260 - [email protected] - capitalmarketalerts.com - New high yield bonds are now being issued at interest rates that don't really qualify as high. Forbes magazine reports that the 30-day average high yield new issue bond yield fell to 6.11% at the end of January. If your company has debt outstanding in an amount of $100 million or more, your company should consider issuing high yield bonds at these historically low rates. Many companies continue to borrow at short-term floating rates because those rates are amazingly low. Most likely, short-term floating rates won't stay this low for 5 to 10 years, however. In contrast, today's high yield bond rates present an opportunity to lock in low rates for a long period. Also, short-term floating rate debt typically carries covenants that restrict a company. Again, in contrast, high yield bonds typically have very few covenants restricting the issuer. Please contact me to discuss raising high yield bonds or any capital market transaction. Forbes article link: http://www.forbes.com/sites/spleverage/2013/01/22/high-yield-bond-yields-hit-record-low-6-11/
Views: 142 Dennis McCarthy
fm-08(english) shares, equity, Preference shares, debenture, bond, rights issue of equity share
 
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Hello friends! I am Nishant and you are watching fm crystal clear. In the last three videos which was fm part 05, 06 and 07, we discussed about short term business financing options Now lets move on and understand the different long term business financing options. That means,what the options are, if someone wants to raise fund for business for a very long period. Some common long term financing options are:- 1. Ordinary shares or Equity 2. Rights issue of equity shares 3. Preference shares 4. Debenture or Bond 5. Warrants 6. Venture Capital financing 7. Secured Premium Notes AND THE LAST ONE IS 8. Asset based financing ( It also has three types) - Lease financing - Hire Purchase and - Project financing In this video we will understand the first four financing options and in the next video we will discuss the next four financing options. The first one is Ordinary shares or Equity Share means a portion of the whole. Any company, often sells its shares to raise fund for business. Big companies issue Initial Public Offerings or IPO and ,Further or follow on Public offerings that means FPO , to sell its shares. The companies which are not listed in stock exchange and issuing shares for the first time, do it through IPO and, on the other hand, the companies which are already listed in stock market issue shares through FPO and raise fund The second one is Rights issue of equity shares When any company gives rights to its existing shareholders to buy its new shares rather than approaching the common people, the process of issuing shares in this way is called Rights issue of equity shares. Third is Preference shares When any listed company sells its shares to the existing selected investors rather than sell it in open market to the common public, the process is called preferential issue of shares and these shares are called preference shares Preference shares are a little bit different from Ordinary shares. Let us see the difference between them Rights in profit Preference share owners have the first rights in company’s profits in comparison with the ordinary share holders. The ordinary shareholders get dividend only after payment of dividend to the preference shareholder. Next is Voting rights Generally Preference shareholders don’t have the voting rights but ordinary shareholders possess this right. Fixed dividend Company gives a fix amount of dividend to the preference shareholders, but the ordinary shareholders don’t get the fix dividend. Cumulative dividend Whatever dividend is unpaid to the preference shareholders, is carried forward. Preference shareholders get all their unpaid dividend before any dividend is paid to the ordinary shareholders. That means the preference shareholders get cumulative dividend. On the other hand, Ordinary shareholders dividend does not carry forward. Claim on assets When any company liquidates that means it is on the verge of closure, it sells all its assets and settles the claim of preference shareholders before the ordinary shareholders. These are some major differences between ordinary shares and preference shares Now let’s move on to the next point Fourth is bonds or debenture Through this instrument, organization gets loan from bond or debenture holders and pay back the loan amount with fix interest after some specific period of time. In this instrument, everything is decided beforehand like maturity period, interest rate etc. This is a long term debt instrument. When it is issued by government or public sector company , it is called bond and when it is issued by a private sector company, it is called debenture. In the next video, which is fm part 09, we will discuss the remaining financing options. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Solved queries in this video:- 1. What is Ordinary shares or Equity? 2. What is Rights issue of equity shares? 3. What is Preference shares? 4. What is Debenture or Bond? 5. What is the difference between debenture and bond? 6. What is the difference between ordinary shares and Preference shares? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Reach out to me at [email protected] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- #financialmanagement #finance #financial market #financialmanagementclass12 #financialmarketclass12 #businessstudiesclass12
IMF To Issue Bonds For 1st Time - Bloomberg
 
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I.M.F. expects to approve issuing $150 billion of bonds. This bond is a way to beef up the cash position as it helps countries. (Bloomberg News)
Views: 52 Bloomberg
Startup Funding Explained: Everything You Need to Know
 
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The Rest Of Us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheRestOfUs The Rest Of Us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/TROUchannel The Rest Of Us T-Shirts and More: http://teespring.com/TheRestOfUsClothing Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcjmVj5fM5k Credits: Music by The FatRat. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCa_UMppcMsHIzb5LDx1u9zQ If you're a YouTuber, definitely check The FatRat. The channel offers a wide variety of free-to-use music for your videos.
Views: 1446235 The Rest Of Us
What is CONVERTIBLE BOND? What does CONVERTIBLE BOND mean? CONVERTIBLE BOND meaning
 
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What is CONVERTIBLE BOND? What does CONVERTIBLE BOND mean? CONVERTIBLE BOND meaning - CONVERTIBLE BOND definition - CONVERTIBLE BOND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In finance, a convertible bond or convertible note or convertible debt (or a convertible debenture if it has a maturity of greater than 10 years) is a type of bond that the holder can convert into a specified number of shares of common stock in the issuing company or cash of equal value. It is a hybrid security with debt- and equity-like features. It originated in the mid-19th century, and was used by early speculators such as Jacob Little and Daniel Drew to counter market cornering. Convertible bonds are most often issued by companies with a low credit rating and high growth potential. To compensate for having additional value through the option to convert the bond to stock, a convertible bond typically has a coupon rate lower than that of similar, non-convertible debt. The investor receives the potential upside of conversion into equity while protecting downside with cash flow from the coupon payments and the return of principal upon maturity. These properties lead naturally to the idea of convertible arbitrage, where a long position in the convertible bond is balanced by a short position in the underlying equity. From the issuer's perspective, the key benefit of raising money by selling convertible bonds is a reduced cash interest payment. The advantage for companies of issuing convertible bonds is that, if the bonds are converted to stocks, companies' debt vanishes. However, in exchange for the benefit of reduced interest payments, the value of shareholder's equity is reduced due to the stock dilution expected when bondholders convert their bonds into new shares.
Views: 709 The Audiopedia
What is the share of a company? How does any company issue a "Share"?
 
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The video lecture explains the meaning of shares in detail. Along with that, it also explains the types of shares and their features. The video ends with discussing the types of issue of shares made by the company.
Views: 1722 Key Differences
Tata plans bond issue to fix JLR payments
 
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The Jaguar is extracting its pound of flesh from Tata Motors. Now the company is raising $877 million in bonds to pay off a part of its $2 billion bridge loan.
Views: 554 NDTV Profit
Green bond introduced in NSE
 
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Nairobi Securities Exchange and Capital Markets Authority have today introduced issuing of listed and unlisted green bonds as part of the strategy of diversifying products in the Kenyan Capital markets. Citizen TV is Kenya's leading television station commanding an audience reach of over 60% and in its over 12 years of existence as a pioneer brand for the Royal Media Services (RMS), it has set footprints across the country leaving no region uncovered. This is your ideal channel for the latest and breaking news, top stories, politics, business, sports, lifestyle and entertainment from Kenya and around the world. Follow us: http://citizentv.co.ke https://twitter.com/citizentvkenya https://www.facebook.com/Citizentvkenya https://plus.google.com/+CitizenTVKenya https://instagram.com/citizentvkenya
Views: 315 Kenya CitizenTV
What is FOREIGN CURRENCY CONVERTIBLE BOND? What does FOREIGN CURRENCY CONVERTIBLE BOND mean?
 
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What is FOREIGN CURRENCY CONVERTIBLE BOND? What does FOREIGN CURRENCY CONVERTIBLE BOND mean? FOREIGN CURRENCY CONVERTIBLE BOND meaning - FOREIGN CURRENCY CONVERTIBLE BOND definition - FOREIGN CURRENCY CONVERTIBLE BOND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Foreign currency convertible bonds (FCCBs) are a special category of bonds. FCCBs are issued in currencies different from the issuing company's domestic currency. Corporates issue FCCBs to raise money in foreign currencies. These bonds retain all features of a convertible bond, making them very attractive to both the investors and the issuers. These bonds assume great importance for multinational corporations and in the current business scenario of globalisation, where companies are constantly dealing in foreign currencies. FCCBs are quasi-debt instruments and tradable on the stock exchange. Investors are hedge-fund arbitrators or foreign nationals. FCCBs appear on the liabilities side of the issuing company's balance sheet. Under IFRS provisions, a company must mark-to-market the amount of its outstanding bonds. The relevant provisions for FCCB accounting are International Accounting Standards: IAS 39, IAS 32 and IFRS 7. FCCB are issued by a company which can be redeemed either at maturity or at a price assured by the issuer. In case the company fails to reach the assured price, bond issuer is to get it redeemed. The price and the yield on the bond moves on the opposite direction. The higher the yield, lower is the price. Foreign currency convertible bonds are equity linked debt securities that are to be converted into equity or depository receipts after a specified period. thus a holder of FCCB has the option of either converting it into equity share at a predetermined price or exchange rate, or retaining the bonds.
Views: 5901 The Audiopedia