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Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 334541 Khan Academy
Calculating the Yield of a Zero Coupon Bond
 
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This video demonstrates how to calculate the yield-to-maturity of a zero-coupon bond. It also provides a formula that can be used to calculate the YTM of any zero-coupon bond. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 29145 Edspira
ep11: Yield curves - par curves, spot curves, bootstrapping...simple explanation
 
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In this video I introduce the concept of yield curves - plots of yield to maturity for various times to maturity for instruments of a similar quality (and often same issuer) I show how we can bootstrap a zero curve (spot curve) from a series of coupon paying instruments as long as we have one instrument on the yield curve that has only one cashflow remaining - this begins the bootstrapping process. I explain how the spot curve can be used to discount the individual cashflows at the correct time/discount factor to arrive at a more accurate fair price for the bond, and then the YTM can be calculated from that price.
Views: 7460 Matt Thomas
FRM: Comparison of spot curve, forward curve and bond yield
 
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A simple comparison using a 2.5 year $100 par 6% semiannual coupon bond. Spot rate: the yield for each cash flow that treats the cash flow as a zero-coupon bond. A coupon-paying bond is a set of zero-coupon bonds. Forward rate: the implied forward rates that make an investor indifferent to rolling over versus investing at spot. Yield to maturity (YTM, an IRR): the single rate that can be used to discount all of the bond's cash flows, in order to price the bond correctly. So the YTM is a flat horizontal line. For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 46424 Bionic Turtle
9. Yield Curve Arbitrage
 
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Financial Theory (ECON 251) Where can you find the market rates of interest (or equivalently the zero coupon bond prices) for every maturity? This lecture shows how to infer them from the prices of Treasury bonds of every maturity, first using the method of replication, and again using the principle of duality. Treasury bond prices, or at least Treasury bond yields, are published every day in major newspapers. From the zero coupon bond prices one can immediately infer the forward interest rates. Under certain conditions these forward rates can tell us a lot about how traders think the prices of Treasury bonds will evolve in the future. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Defining Yield 09:07 - Chapter 2. Assessing Market Interest Rate from Treasury Bonds 35:46 - Chapter 3. Zero Coupon Bonds and the Principle of Duality 50:31 - Chapter 4. Forward Interest Rate 01:10:05 - Chapter 5. Calculating Prices in the Future and Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.
Views: 48751 YaleCourses
Yield curve from coupon bonds (Fixed income 05)
 
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Pre-requisites: Yield curve (Fixed income 03)
Views: 948 A&A Academy
Bonds and Bond Yields
 
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Bonds and Bond Yields. A video covering Bonds and Bond Yields Instagram @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 23135 EconplusDal
Understanding the yield curve
 
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You read about it a lot in the business pages, and it sounds super complicated. But the yield curve is dead easy to read. Especially if you've every played chutes and ladders (snakes and ladders in the UK)
Views: 48001 Marketplace APM
Explaining Bond Prices and Bond Yields
 
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​In this revision video we work through some numerical examples of the inverse relationship between the market price of fixed-interest government bonds and the yields on those bonds. ​Government bonds are fixed interest securities. This means that a bond pays a fixed annual interest – this is known as the coupon The coupon (paid in £s, $s, Euros etc.) is fixed but the yield on a bond will vary The yield is effectively the interest rate on a bond. The yield will vary inversely with the market price of a bond 1.When bond prices are rising, the yield will fall 2.When bond prices are falling, the yield will rise - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 29177 tutor2u
Trading the Treasury Yield Curve
 
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Learn how to use spreads to trade the yield curve, a common strategy and cash and futures U.S. treasury markets. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=cmegroup Learn more: https://institute.cmegroup.com/ CME Group: http://www.cmegroup.com/ Follow us: Twitter: http://twitter.com/CMEGroup Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CMEGroup CME Group is the world's leading and most diverse derivatives marketplace. The company is comprised of four Designated Contract Markets (DCMs). Further information on each exchange's rules and product listings can be found by clicking on the links to CME, CBOT, NYMEX and COMEX.
Views: 723 CME Group
Why Bond Prices and Yields are Inversely Related
 
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Help us make better videos: http://www.informedtrades.com/donate Trade stocks and bonds with Scottrade, the broker Simit uses: http://bit.ly/scottrade-IT (see our review: http://bit.ly/scottrade-IT2) KEY POINTS 1. Bond prices and bond yields move in opposite directions. When bond prices go up, that means yields are going down; when bond prices go down, this means yields are going up. Mathematically, this is because yield is equal to: annual coupon payments/price paid for bond A decrease in price is thus a decrease in the denominator of the equation, which in turn results in a larger number. 2. Conceptually, the reason for why a decrease in bond price results in an increase bond yields can be understood through an example. a. Suppose a corporation issues a bond to a bondholder for $100, and with a promise of $5 in coupon payments per year. This bond thus has a yield of 5%. ($5/$100 = 5%) b. Suppose the same corporation then issues additional bonds, also for $100 but this time promising $6 in coupon payments for year -- and thus yielding 6%. No rational investor would choose the old bond; instead, they would all purchase the new bond, because it yielded more and was at the same price. As a result, if a holder of the old bonds needed to sell them, he/she would need to do so at a lower price. For instance, if holder of the old bonds was willing to sell it at $83.33, than any prospective buyer would get a bond that earned $5 in coupon payments on an $83.33 payment -- effectively an annual yield of 6% (5/83.33). The yield to maturity could be even higher, since the bond would give the bondholder $100 upon reaching maturity. 3. The longer the duration of the bonds, the more sensitivity there is to interest rate moves. For instance, if interest rates rise in year 3 of a 30 year bond (meaning there are 27 years left until maturity) the price of the bond would fall more than if interest rates rise in year 3 of a 5 year bond. This is because an interest in interest rates reduces the relative appeal of existing coupon payments, and the more coupon payments that are remaining, the more interest rate fluctuations will impact the price of the bond. 4. Lastly, a small note on jargon: when investors or commentators say, "bonds are up," (or down) they are referring to bond prices. "Bonds are up" thus means bond prices are up and yields are down; conversely, "bonds are down" means bond prices are down and yields are up.
Views: 54384 InformedTrades
Bonds | Confused between the rates: Spot, Forward, Coupon, Current Yield, IRR, YTM, BEY
 
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CFA | FRM | SFM | Excel Live Classes | Videos Available Globally For Details: www.aswinibajaj.com WhatsApp: +91 9831149876 or https://api.whatsapp.com/send?phone=919830497377&text=Want%20to%20know%20more%20about%20classes & we shall get back to you. E-mail: [email protected] Hope you had a great learning experience! Do Like and Subscribe! And check our other videos on Finance (CFA, FRM, SFM), Resume making, Career options, etc. Click to access playlist. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyt8... Thank you.
Views: 7137 ASWINI BAJAJ
Generating a Yield Curve with the Nelson-Siegel-Svensson Method, Excel Library, Video 00020
 
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In this Excel Library video, we take a limited amount of bond yield information, and then extrapolate and interpolate from this a good-fitting yield curve which covers all the 'potential' rates in-between. We do this using the Nelson-Siegel-Svensson method, via the Excel data tool, Solver, and minimise residual error squares to create a believable yield curve, despite a lack of complete information. The main block of Nelson-Siegel-Svensson Excel formula code used in this video can be copied from here: http://mithrilmoney.com/excel-library-generating-a-yield-curve-with-the-nelson-siegel-svensson-method/ For financial education from London to Singapore and beyond, please contact MithrilMoney via the following website: http://mithrilmoney.com This MithrilMoney lecture was delivered by Andy Duncan, CQF. Please read our disclaimer: http://mithrilmoney.com/disclaimer/
Views: 45473 MithrilMoney
Coupon bond carry
 
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The carry of a financial instrument is the P&L generated by the instrument when the underlying risk drivers follow the most likely path. In the case of bonds, the natural risk driver is the yield curve and there are two versions of "most likely" path: 1) The spot yield curve stays unchanged as time goes by 2) The spot yield curve evolves into the forward curve at each time in the future As a result, two notions of carry ensue. In this video we consider the carry from 1) in a 15-year bond with yearly coupons. In the bottom plot we show the steady path of the spot yield curve. As time goes by, the time to maturity of the bond shortens, and the yield of the last coupon follows the red dot down the curve. In the top plot we plot the carry, which, like the P&L, has two components: i) The cash (or "realized") carry/P&L, due to the coupons (light gray, called "coupon") ii) The mark-to-market (or "unrealized") P&L, due to the changes in the bond value/price (dark gray, called "price") Notice how over time the dominant component is the cash/coupon carry. Also notice how, despite the mark-to-market/price component can be negative at times, the total carry is always positive. This and other MATLAB-powered educational videos at the ARPM Bootcamp www.arpm.co.
define and compare the spot curve, yield curve on coupon bonds, par curve, and forward curve;
 
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define and compare the spot curve, yield curve on coupon bonds, par curve, and forward curve;
Views: 1 Ted Stephenson
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 464161 Khan Academy
How to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity
 
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This video will show you how to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity in a financial calculator. If you need to find the Present value by hand please watch this video :) http://youtu.be/5uAICRPUzsM There are more videos for EXCEL as well Like and subscribe :) Please visit us at http://www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning
Views: 263522 I Hate Math Group, Inc
FRM: Bootstrapping the Treasury spot rate curve
 
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The theoretical spot rate curve is different than the par yield curve. Here is how to bootstrap the spot rate. For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 82683 Bionic Turtle
Investopedia Video: Bond Yields - Current Yield and YTM
 
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The current yield and yield to maturity (YTM) are two popular bond yield measures. The current yield tells investors what they will earn from buying a bond and holding it for one year. The yield to maturity (YTM) is the bond's anticipated return if held until it matures.
Views: 82297 Investopedia
Bootstrapping
 
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Calculation of the theoretical Treasury spot rate curve using bootstrapping and the value of a bond using spot rates.
Views: 23206 EduPristine
Par yield
 
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The yield (aka, yield to maturity, YTM) is the single rate that correctly prices the bond; it impounds the spot rate curve. For each coupon bond, there is a different implied yield. The PAR YIELD is the yield (YTM) for a bond that happens to price at par, and therefore is equal to this bond's coupon. So, the par yield (as a special case or particular YTM) is the coupon rate on a bond priced at par.
Views: 17121 Bionic Turtle
Investopedia Video: Zero-Coupon Bond
 
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A debt security that doesn't pay interest (a coupon) but is traded at a deep discount, rendering profit at maturity when the bond is redeemed for its full face value. For more Investopedia videos, check out; http://www.investopedia.com/video/
Views: 45980 Investopedia
Zero Coupon Bonds and The Yield Curve
 
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MBA:8180 Managerial Finance Zero Coupon Bonds and The Yield Curve Video
Views: 7 Thomas Rietz
What is a Yield Curve?
 
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If you've been following what the Federal Reserve is doing with the interest rate, you have probably heard them talk about the yield curve. Marketplace Senior Editor Paddy Hirsch explains what the curve is and what happens if it gets flattened. For more stories: marketplace.org/whiteboard
Views: 57297 Marketplace APM
Calculating the Yield of a Zero Coupon Bond using Forward Rates
 
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This video shows how to calculate the yield-to-maturity of a zero-coupon bond using forward rates. A comprehensive example is provided to demonstrate how a formula can be used to compute the yield of a zero-coupon bond when you know the forward rates. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 6478 Edspira
Yield Curve Analysis - Chapter 1
 
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This module discusses properties of the various yield curves used in fixed income analysis, including the construction of the zero-coupon and the forward yield curves from the ordinary curve for bills and bonds as well as the theories behind the different shapes that these curves can take.
The Inverted Yield Curve, Lecture 016, Securities Investment 101, Video00018
 
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In this lecture we describe the inverted yield curve and how it differs from the normal yield curve. Before we get to that, we explain the strategy of 'riding the yield curve' and then why the inverted yield curve is such a dangerous thing when riding the yield curve. We explain why the inverted yield curve usually occurs, and why this makes it a good leading economic indicator for predicting near-term recessions. Along the way, we also introduce Zero-Coupon bonds, which are bonds with a single principal maturity payment without any intervening coupon-interest payments. Previous lecture: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1Fq_1pg7xE Next lecture: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BW4J2HAd4VI For financial education from London to Singapore and beyond, please contact MithrilMoney via the following website: http://mithrilmoney.com/ This MithrilMoney lecture was delivered by Andy Duncan, CQF. Please read our disclaimer: http://mithrilmoney.com/disclaimer/
Views: 21922 MithrilMoney
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
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This narrated PPT describes how a zero coupon bond works, along with an example of how to calculate the yield to maturity. We contrast the yield to maturity with the bond equivalent yield.
Views: 21173 Elizabeth Schmitt
yield curve calculation
 
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simple calculation in Excel of a yield curve starting with the forward curve
Views: 6095 Joe Troccolo
Calculating the Forward Rate
 
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This video shows how to calculate the Forward Rate using yields from zero-coupon bonds. A comprehensive example is provided along with a formula to show how the Forward Rate is computed based on zero-coupon yields. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 64196 Edspira
8. Value a Bond and Calculate Yield to Maturity (YTM)
 
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Download Preston's 1 page checklist for finding great stock picks: http://buffettsbooks.com/checklist Preston Pysh is the #1 selling Amazon author of two books on Warren Buffett. The books can be found at the following location: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0982967624/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0982967624&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=EOHYVY7DPUCW3WD4 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1939370159/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1939370159&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=XRE5CA2QJ3I2OWSW In this lesson, we began to understand the important terms that truly value a bond. Since most investors will never hold a bond throughout the entire term, understanding how to value the asset becomes very important. As we get into the second course of this website, a thorough understanding of these terms is needed. So, be sure to learn it now and not jump ahead. We learned that there are two ways to look at the value of a bond, simple interest and compound interest. As an intelligent investor, you'll really want to focus on understanding compound interest. The term that was really important to understand in this lesson was yield to maturity. This term was really important because it accounted for almost every variable we could consider when determining the true value (or intrinsic value) of the bond. Yield to Maturity estimates the total amount of money you will earn over the entire life of the bond, but it actually accounts for all coupons, interest-on-interest, and gains or losses you'll sustain from the difference between the price you pay and the par value.
Views: 334795 Preston Pysh
FRM Part I- Concept of Bootstrapping- Fixed Income
 
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We offer the most comprehensive and easy to understand video lectures for CFA and FRM Programs. To know more about our video lecture series, visit us at www.fintreeindia.com Video lecture recorded during a live classroom session of FRM Part- I in FinTree at Pune center. This Video covers bootstrapping spot rates from bond prices.
Views: 15823 FinTree
The Differences Between Coupon, Yield and Expected Return
 
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Many investors believe the terms coupon, yield and expected return are interchangeable when it comes to bonds and other fixed income investments. Buckingham Fixed Income Advisor Jared Kizer discusses the important differences among these terms.
Yield Curve Analysis - Chapter 5 - Quiz
 
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This module discusses properties of the various yield curves used in fixed income analysis, including the construction of the zero-coupon and the forward yield curves from the ordinary curve for bills and bonds as well as the theories behind the different shapes that these curves can take.
US Treasury Forward Rates & Zero Coupon Yields, 1962-2016
 
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Kamakura Risk Manager was used to create maximum smoothness forward rates and zero coupon yields from U.S. Department of the Treasury data on a daily basis from January 2, 1962 to December 30, 2016. More at [email protected]
Views: 1192 KamakuraCorporation
Bonds & Yields in Hindi - Part 1 (बॉन्ड्स और  यील्ड)
 
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This video introduces the concept of Bonds. What are bonds and why are they issued. What is a bond, meaning and information of bonds in Hindi. बॉन्ड्स क्या होते है, बॉन्ड्स और बॉन्ड मार्किट की जानकारी, बॉन्ड्स का अर्थ, बॉन्ड्स ट्रेडिंग और बॉन्ड यील्ड. बॉन्ड या बॉन्ड्स (Bonds) एक प्रकार का ऋण होता है. इसे एक प्रकार का उधार पत्र भी कह सकते है. इसे आमतौर पर किसी देश की सरकार के द्वारा जारी किया जाता है.
Views: 19315 Rajiv Dharmadhikari
Bond Futures: How To Trade the Yield Curve Bond Futures | Bond Futures Trading Strategies tutorial
 
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Let me show the Correct Way to Trade Bond Futures Learn how to Trade Bond Futures. DONT MISS YOUR FREE WEEK https://goo.gl/RXhLnY .This is Bond Futures Trading Strategies tutorial. What is Bond Futures? Although the stock market is the first place in which many people think to invest, the U.S. Treasury bond markets arguably have the greatest impact on the economy and are watched the world over. Unfortunately, just because they are influential, doesn't make them any easier to understand, and they can be downright bewildering to the uninitiated. At the most basic level, a bond is a loan. Just as people obtain a loan from the bank, governments and companies borrow money from citizens in the form of bonds. A bond really is nothing more than a loan issued by you, the investor, to the government or company, the issuer. For the privilege of using your money, the bond issuer pays something extra in the form of interest payments that are made at a predetermined rate and schedule. The interest rate often is referred to as the coupon, and the date on which the issuer must repay the amount borrowed, or face value, is called the maturity date. One wrinkle in the equation, though, is that not all debt is created equal with some issuers being more likely to default on their obligation. As such, credit rating agencies evaluate companies and governments to give them a grade on how likely they are to repay the debt (see "Good, better, best"). Benji Baily and Delmar King, fixed income investment managers at Everence Financial, say ratings generally can be classified as investment grade or junk. "Anything that's considered to be an investment grade, you would have a fairly high probability that you're going to get your money back at maturity," King says. "Of course, the lower you go down the credit spectrum, the more risk there is of default and the possibility that you could have losses. Therefore, the lower the security grade you have, the more yield compensation you should have for taking that default risk." So, if you purchased a 30-year U.S. Treasury bond (currently AA+ from S&P and AAA from Moody's and Fitch) for $100,000 with a coupon rate of 6%, then you could expect to receive $6,000 a year for the duration of the bond and then receive the face value of $100,000 back. At least, that's how a bond would work if you held it to maturity. Rather than hold a bond to maturity, they also can be traded. But, as a bond is traded, interest rates can change, so the overall value of the bond can change. "If you bought a bond that has a 10% coupon and the rest of the market is fine with owning a 1% coupon, then someone is going to love to have that 10% coupon until maturity," Baily says. "Conversely, if you have a 1% bond and everyone else is expecting that the market in general will be at 10%, then you're going to need to pay someone a lot of money to take that 1% bond instead of buying a new 10% bond." Because coupon rates generally are fixed, to adjust for future expectations the price of the bond or note has to move up or down. If yields, the interest or dividends received on a security, go up, the price will fall to accommodate that higher yield; if yields go down, then price has to go up. GRAB YOUR FREE WEEK HERE https://goo.gl/RXhLnY 5 Secret Tips Options Trading: How To Trade Stock Options: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2v-LrBoFWA 5 Secret Tips to Trade Stock Options During Earnings Season - options for beginners https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awbh33LxYXk How to trade stock options Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awbh33LxYXk&list=PLR_XM0ZsTUySgd3JmlvNv0xosYVz5iAcr SUBSCRIBE FOR STOCK OPTION EDUCATION AND TRADE IDEAS! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCa5hPmX8-q03fxDYLi9XM7w SUBSCRIBE TO OUR EMAIL LIST http://activedaytrader.com Email me anytime: [email protected] analysis options for beginners technical analysis options strategies Tending search on youtube: #stockOptions #howtotradestockoptions #tradingStrategies #tradingOptions #BondFutures #BondFuturesStrategies
Views: 3974 Jonathan Rose
What is the zero coupon yield curve
 
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What is the zero coupon yield curve - Find out more explanation for : 'What is the zero coupon yield curve' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Thai Government Bond Forward Rates and Zero Coupon Bond Yields
 
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This video graphs the movements in maximum smoothness forward rates and zero coupon bond yields for the Thai Government Bond yield curve, daily from September 15, 1999 to December 30, 2016. Analysis by Kamakura Corporation from data from the Thai Bond Market Association. We recommend the video that uses "Thai On the Run" maturities only. The full set of yields from the Thai Bond Market Association contains some smoothing errors.
Bonds & Yields - part 2 Hindi, (बॉन्ड्स और यील्ड) meaning of yield, यील्ड का अर्थ
 
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This video explains the concept of yield i.e. what is yield, calculation of yield and correlation between the prices of bonds and yields. This video is very important for learning the concept of bonds and is very useful for beginners and experts who want to learn more about trading in stock markets. This video also explains the concept of yield to maturity. यह विडियो यील्ड का अर्थ क्या होता है और यील्ड तथा बॉन्ड्स के भावों के बीच का सबंध सिखाता है.
Views: 10554 Rajiv Dharmadhikari
Bootstrapping using Treasury spot rates
 
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How to estimate treasury spot rates (term of structure interest rates) based on Treasury yields.
Views: 2682 Qobil Yunusov
Bond Pricing on the Term Structure of Interest Rates with Expected Inflation Rate Changes
 
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Consider the following spot interest rates for maturities of one, two, three, and four years. Year | Rate 1 | 4% 2 | 5% 3 | 6% 4 | 7% What is the price of a four year, 4 percent coupon bond with a face value of $100? Assume the bond pays an annual coupon. What are our expectations of the yield for a one year bond that starts in one, two, and three years, i.e., what are the forward rates? Suppose the inflation expectations are a constant 2 percent, what are the expected real interest rates for each one year period in the future? Suppose that immediately after purchasing the bond that market expectations of the inflation rate decrease to a constant one percent. What are our new nominal forward rates? Assume expectations of real interest rates have not changed. In one year, what do we expect the new term structure of interest rates to be? In one year, what do we expect the price of the bond to be based on the new term structure of interest rates? What do we expect the holding period return to be if you sell it immediately after receiving the first year’s coupon? Note: There is a typo in calculating the holding period return. The correct formula is (92.22 - 90.17 + 4)/90.17 = 6.7% Note: A pdf of the solution is available from here: https://goo.gl/MeMDkv
Singapore Government Bond Forward Rates and Zero Yields, 1998 to 2016
 
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Using Kamakura Risk Manager, forward rates and zero coupon bond yields were generated to be consistent with yield curves published by the Monetary Authority of Singapore. The maximum smoothness forward rate technique of Adams and van Deventer was applied.
Views: 110 KamakuraCorporation
Calculate Yield - Zero Coupon Bond
 
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Calculate Yield - Zero Coupon Bond
Views: 1665 Ed Kaplan
FRM: TI BA II+ to compute bond yield (YTM)
 
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Given four inputs (price, term/maturity, coupon rate, and face/par value), we can use the calculator's I/Y to find the bond's yield (yield to maturity). For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 103492 Bionic Turtle
Yield To Maturity - YTM - Bond Example
 
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Example: Suppose you have a risk-free bond that has a face value of $100, a two year maturity, pays a 3 percent coupon with semiannual coupons. The bond is currently trading at $97. What are the stream of cash flows associated with the bond? What is the yield to maturity.
Coupon Bonds
 
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This narrated PPT describes how a coupon bond works, along with an example of how to calculate the yield to maturity. We contrast the yield to maturity with the bond equivalent yield.
Views: 1466 Elizabeth Schmitt
4 Usual Confusions in Bond Valuation: Tutorial for Bond Value in Valuing Bonds (super easy)
 
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OMG wow! I'm SHOCKED how easy! Clicked here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE-vj43wHOQ No wonder others goin crazy sharing this??? What amount is best to be willing to pay for a bond? A bond's value is driven by impending cash flows you are likely to generate by possessing the bond. Where do the prospective cash flows come from? They come from 1) the coupon payments which symbolize cash earnings for the owner of the bond, and 2) the remuneration of principal ("face value" of the bond).Utilizing the Bond Valuation Formula and presuming a 5% level of interest from a bank, a bond that has a $1,000 face value and 4% coupon rate which might grant you $4 annually for 7 years plus enable you to recoup the $1,000 face value after 7 years should in truth maintain a fair value of $941... which happens to be obviously less than the $1,000 face value. Thus even if the face value is $1,000, you must be prepared to pay a maximum of only $941 to obtain this bond.(The formula is a bit complicated and concerns an abundance of aspects, such as the yield or yield to maturity, remaining time until maturity, not to mention different variables. You ordinarily don't need to actually do calculations by yourself if you're not in business school. There are loads of accessible calculators via the internet.)What exactly does the $941 earlier mentioned suggest? If you should pay more than $941 for this bond, you would be better off depositing your dollars in the bank instead. Put differently, in case you compensate beyond $941, your rate of return for maintaining this bond could possibly be under the bank interest rate of 5%. Consequently... it would be preferable to deposit in the bank.So when a bond is obtained or sold, is it acquired or sold at the face value or at the fair value?For the most part, if it happens to be the first time a bond is being issued and sold by the issuing firm in the primary bond market, it is carried out with the face value. However, in the secondary market, in the event the bond is purchased or sold by unique people, it is exchanged at market value, which is often differ from both the face value and fair value. The market value is basically what true persons are prepared to pay or deal for the bond, whether or not this is much less or greater than the face value and/or fair value. Normally though, the market value is nearer to the fair value than to the face value. Take into account however, that in the secondary market, a large component which impacts bond price is risk as symbolized by its credit rating, and this factor is not covered in the formula used to find out how to value a bond which has been referred to above. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE-vj43wHOQ http://mbabullshit.com/blog/bond-valuation-in-35-minutes/
Views: 76920 MBAbullshitDotCom