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Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 542272 Khan Academy
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
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When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 527955 Khan Academy
Bonds and Bond Yields
 
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Bonds and Bond Yields. A video covering Bonds and Bond Yields Instagram @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 28241 EconplusDal
What is CORPORATE BOND? What does CORPORATE BOND mean? CORPORATE BOND meaning & explanation
 
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What is CORPORATE BOND? What does CORPORATE BOND mean? CORPORATE BOND meaning - CORPORATE BOND definition - CORPORATE BOND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A corporate bond is a bond issued by a corporation in order to raise financing for a variety of reasons such as to ongoing operations, M&A, or to expand business. The term is usually applied to longer-term debt instruments, with maturity of at least one year. Corporate debt instruments with maturity shorter than one year are referred to as commercial paper. The term "corporate bond" is not strictly defined. Sometimes, the term is used to include all bonds except those issued by governments in their own currencies. In this case governments issuing in other currencies (such as the country of Mexico issuing in US dollars) will be included. The term sometimes also encompasses bonds issued by supranational organizations (such as European Bank for Reconstruction and Development). Strictly speaking, however, it only applies to those issued by corporations. The bonds of local authorities (municipal bonds) are not included. Corporate bonds trade in decentralized, dealer-based, over-the-counter markets. In over-the-counter trading dealers act as intermediaries between buyers and sellers. Corporate bonds are sometimes listed on exchanges (these are called "listed" bonds) and ECNs. However, vast majority of trading volume happens over-the-counter. By far the largest market for corporate bonds is in corporate bonds denominated in US Dollars. US Dollar corporate bond market is the oldest, largest, and most developed. As the term corporate bond is not well defined, the size of the market varies according to who is doing the counting, but it is in the $5 to $6 trillion range. The second largest market is in Euro denominated corporate bonds. Other markets tend to be small by comparison and are usually not well developed, with low trading volumes. Many corporations from other countries issue in either US Dollars or Euros. Foreign corporates issuing bonds in the US Dollar market are called Yankees and their bonds are Yankee bonds. Corporate bonds are divided into two main categories High Grade (also called Investment Grade) and High Yield (also called Non-Investment Grade, Speculative Grade, or Junk Bonds) according to their credit rating. Bonds rated AAA, AA, A, and BBB are High Grade, while bonds rated BB and below are High Yield. This is a significant distinction as High Grade and High Yield bonds are traded by different trading desks and held by different investors. For example, many pension funds and insurance companies are prohibited from holding more than a token amount of High Yield bonds (by internal rules or government regulation). The distinction between High Grade and High Yield is also common to most corporate bond markets. The coupon (i.e. interest payment) is usually taxable for the investor. It is tax deductible for the corporation paying it. For US Dollar corporates, the coupon is almost always semi annual, while Euro denominated corporates pay coupon quarterly. The coupon can be zero. In this case the bond, a zero-coupon bond, is sold at a discount (i.e. a $100 face value bond sold initially for $80). The investor benefits by paying $80, but collecting $100 at maturity. The $20 gain (ignoring time value of money) is in lieu of the regular coupon. However, this is rare for corporate bonds. Some corporate bonds have an embedded call option that allows the issuer to redeem the debt before its maturity date. These are called callable bonds. A less common feature is an embedded put option that allows investors to put the bond back to the issuer before its maturity date. These are called putable bonds. Both of these features are common to the High Yield market. High Grade bonds rarely have embedded options. A straight bond that is neither callable nor putable is called a bullet bond.
Views: 1788 The Audiopedia
FRM Part I : Corporate Bonds Part I(of 3)
 
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FinTree website link: http://www.fintreeindia.com FB Page link :http://www.facebook.com/Fin... This series of video covers following key areas: • A bond indenture and explain the role of the corporate trustee in a bond indenture • A bond's maturity date and how it impacts bond retirements • The main types of interest payment classifications • Zero-Coupon bonds and the relationship between original issue discount and reinvestment risk • Among the following security types relevant for corporate bonds: mortgage bonds, collateral trust bonds, equipment trust certificates, subordinated and convertible debenture bonds, and guaranteed bonds • The mechanisms by which corporate bonds can be retired before maturity • Credit default risk and credit spread risk • Event risk and explain what may cause it in corporate bonds We love what we do, and we make awesome video lectures for CFA and FRM exams. Our Video Lectures are comprehensive, easy to understand and most importantly, fun to study with! This Video lecture was recorded by our popular trainer for CFA, Mr. Utkarsh Jain, during one of his live FRM Classes in Pune (India).
Views: 5320 FinTree
3 Minutes! Bond Valuation Explained and How to Value a Bond
 
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OMG wow! Clicked here http://mbabullshit.com I'm shocked how easy, bond valuation video.. What is a Bond? Basically, a bond is a certificate which proves that a company borrowed money from you and now owes you money. Owning a bond is a way to earn interest payments instead of putting your money in a bank. Therefore, if a bond can give you high interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, a bond value should be high. On the other hand, if a bond will give you small coupon payments compared to bank interest, the bond value should be low. A bond can be bought either from the original company which issues the bond, or from people who already bought the bond from the corporation, but who want to sell the bond before it expires because they don’t want to wait too long before they get back their original investment So to find the theoretical value of a bond, we need to think about the bond’s interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, the bond’s face value, and the length of time before maturity when you get back the full face value of the bond. Sears Bond photo credit: Tom Spree via Wikipedia Creative Commons
Views: 90342 MBAbullshitDotCom
How to Price/Value Bonds - Formula, Annual, Semi-Annual, Market Value, Accrued Interest
 
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http://www.subjectmoney.com http://www.subjectmoney.com/definitiondisplay.php?word=Bond%20Pricing In this video we show you how to calculate the value or price of a bond. We teach you the present value formula and then use examples to discount the coupon payments and principle payment to their present value. We also show you how to solve the price of a semi-annual bond. In this case you would multiply the periods by two and divide the YTM and coupon payments by 2. We also show you how to solve the accrued interest of a bond to find out what it would sell for at a date that is not on the exact coupon payment date. https://www.youtube.com/user/Subjectmoney https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zCqoED8MVk http://www.roofstampa.com hjttp://roofstampa.com http:/www.subjectmoney.com http://www.excelfornoobs.com
Views: 86839 Subjectmoney
Debt vs. Equity Analysis: How to Advise Companies on Financing
 
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In this tutorial, you'll learn how to analyze Debt vs. Equity financing options for a company, evaluate the credit stats and ratios in different operational cases, and make a recommendation based on both qualitative and quantitative factors. http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Table of Contents: 0:50 The Short, Simple Answer 3:54 The Longer Answer – Central Japan Railway Example 12:31 Recap and Summary If you have an upcoming case study where you have to analyze a company's financial statements and recommend Debt or Equity, how should you do it? SHORT ANSWER: All else being equal, companies want the cheapest possible financing. Since Debt is almost always cheaper than Equity, Debt is almost always the answer. Debt is cheaper than Equity because interest paid on Debt is tax-deductible, and lenders' expected returns are lower than those of equity investors (shareholders). The risk and potential returns of Debt are both lower. But there are also constraints and limitations on Debt – the company might not be able to exceed a certain Debt / EBITDA, or it might have to keep its EBITDA / Interest above a certain level. So, you have to test these constraints first and see how much Debt a company can raise, or if it has to use Equity or a mix of Debt and Equity. The Step-by-Step Process Step 1: Create different operational scenarios for the company – these can be simple, such as lower revenue growth and margins in the Downside case. Step 2: "Stress test" the company and see if it can meet the required credit stats, ratios, and other requirements in the Downside cases. Step 3: If not, try alternative Debt structures (e.g., no principal repayments but higher interest rates) and see if they work. Step 4: If not, consider using Equity for some or all of the company's financing needs. Real-Life Example – Central Japan Railway The company needs to raise ¥1.6 trillion ($16 billion USD) of capital to finance a new railroad line. Option #1: Additional Equity funding (would represent 43% of its current Market Cap). Option #2: Term Loans with 10-year maturities, 5% amortization, ~4% interest, 50% cash flow sweep, and maintenance covenants. Option #3: Subordinated Notes with 10-year maturities, no amortization, ~8% interest rates, no early repayments, and only a Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) covenant. We start by evaluating the Term Loans since they're the cheapest form of financing. Even in the Base Case, it would be almost impossible for the company to comply with the minimum DSCR covenant, and it looks far worse in the Downside cases Next, we try the Subordinated Notes instead – the lack of principal repayment will make it easier for the company to comply with the DSCR. The DSCR numbers are better, but there are still issues in the Downside and Extreme Downside cases. So, we decide to try some amount of Equity as well. We start with 25% or 50% Equity, which we can simulate by setting the EBITDA multiple for Debt to 1.5x or 1.0x instead. The DSCR compliance is much better in these scenarios, but we still run into problems in Year 4. Overall, though, 50% Subordinated Notes / 50% Equity is better if we strongly believe in the Extreme Downside case; 75% / 25% is better if the normal Downside case is more plausible. Qualitative factors also support our conclusions. For example, the company has extremely high EBITDA margins, low revenue growth, and stable cash flows due to its near-monopoly in the center of Japan, so it's an ideal candidate for Debt. Also, there's limited downside risk in the next 5-10 years; population decline in Japan is more of a concern over the next several decades. RESOURCES: https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Debt-vs-Equity-Analysis-Slides.pdf
Bond Issuance Examples
 
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Roger Philipp, CPA, CGMA, presents a basic bond issue with a face value of $1 million, term of 5 years, and stated or coupon rate of 8% in the video 11.01 - Bond Issuance Examples. He also shows the journal entries for issuance and interest payments at market rates or effective rates of 8%, then 10%, and then 6%. If the bond is issued to yield 8%, then the bond is issued at par and interest expense will equal the interest payment. If the effective interest rate is 10% then the bond is issued at a discount. Now interest expense will no longer equal the cash coupon interest paid. Roger explains how to set up the journal entry, keeping things simple for now with straight-line amortization of the bond discount. Roger continues the problem by showing in the journal entry how the issuer’s interest expense will equal the market rate of 10%. Finally, Roger walks through the journal entries for this 8% face rate bond issued at a premium with a yield of 6%. As an advanced bonus, Roger has us consider the effects of the bond interest payments on the statement of cash flows. Connect with us: Website: https://www.rogercpareview.com Blog: https://www.rogercpareview.com/blog Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RogerCPAReview Twitter: https://twitter.com/rogercpareview LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/roger-cpa-review Are you accounting faculty looking for FREE CPA Exam resources in the classroom? Visit our Professor Resource Center: https://www.rogercpareview.com/professor-resource-center/ Video Transcript Sneak Peek: Now, next page it says issuance of bonds example and we're going to go through this example. Face value of the bonds, million dollars. Term, five year versus what? Term versus serial bond which matures in installments. Stated interest rate 8%. That's how much cash I'm going to get. I'm going to get 8% of a million dollars or $80,000 in cash but what am I earning? That's a different question. Then it says effective or market or yield is eight in example A, ten in example B, six in example C. Notice that we're going to be doing three examples. One is going to be eight, eight which is issued at par, issued at face. We don't have to worry about the discounted premium then we'll go to a discount example, then we'll go to a premium example and then life will be beautiful for you, things will make sense.
Views: 27247 Roger CPA Review
Fixed Income Investment – Asset Backed Investment Bond – Bi annual Interest payment
 
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This fixed income Investment Bond is Asset Backed with the bond holders have security over mining assets valued at AU$286m. The Security is governed by and enforceable under English Law and assets are pledged to the trustee. http://investglobalmanagement.com/fixed-income-12-pa-5-years
Views: 506 Invest Global
Types of Bonds
 
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This video discusses the various types of bonds issued by firms and other organizations. It provides examples and explains the meaning of various bond characteristics, such as call features, convertibility, securitization, etc. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 73425 Edspira
Bond Valuation | Finance | Chegg Tutors
 
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Bond valuation is used to determine the fair price of a bond. A bond is a debt instrument used by corporations and governments to borrow capital. Normally, the bond issuer agrees to make periodic interest payments (coupons) on the funds received, as well as repay the principal on a specific date (maturity or par value). The value of a bond is calculated using discounted cash flow analysis. That is, a bond's value is equal to the present value of its future coupons, plus the present value of the principal repayment. There are a number of other factors usually considered in evaluating a bond, including the issuer's credit rating and the risk that interest rates will go up (decreasing the value of the bond). --------- Finance tutoring on Chegg Tutors Learn about Finance terms like Bond Valuation on Chegg Tutors. Work with live, online Finance tutors like Nathan G. who can help you at any moment, whether at 2pm or 2am. Liked the video tutorial? Schedule lessons on-demand or schedule weekly tutoring in advance with tutors like Nathan G. Visit: https://www.chegg.com/tutors/Finance-online-tutoring/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=video&utm_content=managed&utm_campaign=videotutorials ---------- About Nathan G., Finance tutor on Chegg Tutors: Texas State, Class of 2010 Finance/Accounting major Subjects tutored: Accounting TEACHING EXPERIENCE: Educated from Texas State University, I received my BBA Accounting in 2010. During college, I would often study with classmates. I noticed how much I enjoyed helping them with Accounting. I then knew I had a skill underutilized. My passion for tutoring fuels my desire to see you succeed. With over 7 years of instructional experience, I will provide the tools to help you master Accounting. Check out my YouTube Channel to learn more about EXTRACURRICULAR INTERESTS I am a man of many tastes. I really enjoy technology, racquetball, basketball, real estate investing practices, web development, and comedy! I love diversifying my interests so I never get bored lol. Hope to hear from you soon! We'll setup a plan to help you succeed in Accounting. Want to book a private lesson with Nathan G.? Message Nathan G. at https://www.chegg.com/tutors/online-tutors/Nathan-G-862370/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=video&utm_content=managed&utm_campaign=videotutorials ---------- Like what you see? Subscribe to Chegg's Youtube Channel: http://bit.ly/1PwMn3k ---------- Visit Chegg.com for purchasing or renting textbooks, getting homework help, finding an online tutor, applying for scholarships and internships, discovering colleges, and more! Learn more at https://www.chegg.com/ FB: https://www.facebcook.com/chegg Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/chegg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chegg
Views: 9117 Chegg
How to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity
 
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This video will show you how to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity in a financial calculator. If you need to find the Present value by hand please watch this video :) http://youtu.be/5uAICRPUzsM There are more videos for EXCEL as well Like and subscribe :) Please visit us at http://www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning
Views: 298497 I Hate Math Group, Inc
Explaining Bond Prices and Bond Yields
 
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​In this revision video we work through some numerical examples of the inverse relationship between the market price of fixed-interest government bonds and the yields on those bonds. ​Government bonds are fixed interest securities. This means that a bond pays a fixed annual interest – this is known as the coupon The coupon (paid in £s, $s, Euros etc.) is fixed but the yield on a bond will vary The yield is effectively the interest rate on a bond. The yield will vary inversely with the market price of a bond 1.When bond prices are rising, the yield will fall 2.When bond prices are falling, the yield will rise - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 50342 tutor2u
A quick guide to bonds
 
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Bonds – retail bonds or corporate bonds – are a way for companies to borrow money from investors in return for regular interest payments. Find out more about bonds at https://thebusinessfinanceguide.co.uk/solutions/bonds/ Video Summary: A bond is essentially an IOU that a business provides to an investor. A simple way to think of a bond is that you have a commitment to an investor to pay what’s called a coupon for example 5%, and you will pay that over the duration of the bond. So if you received say a £10,000 bond at a 5% coupon, you would have a commitment to pay £500 per year for 10 years, and the full amount of £10,000 at the end of 10 years. So this can be quite attractive to some businesses because you’re paying the interest as you go along, but you are only repaying the capital much later – in this example 10 years later. So this gives the business quite a long time to build up the reserves to repay the capital. A brand can be very useful if you are doing a bond issue. Members of the public are more likely to provide finance if they are familiar with the brand, though it’s not essential. I would say you would need in general to be looking to raise at last £500,000, but there have been recent cases of businesses raising a very sizeable amount through a bond issue. For example, in recent years, Hotel Chocolat raised £4m on the bond market. In summary, you would need to be not very small business, but one that would be able to support borrowings of this size. It is certainly an attractive option for some. For more information: Website: https://thebusinessfinanceguide.co.uk/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheBusinessFinanceGuide/
3 Steps to Easy Bond Investing [Market-Proof Your Portfolio]
 
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Stop missing out on your best opportunity for cash flow and safe returns. Learn the secret to investing in bonds and get started now with Step-by-Step Bond Investing https://amzn.to/2MqKE5d Bond investments are way underrated by investors with less than 2% of investors holding any fixed-income at all in their portfolio. That’s despite the fact that bonds provide rock-solid cash flow and safe returns compared to stocks. In fact, bonds have actually beaten the return on stocks during the last decade. Now I love investing in stocks just as much as the next person and I’m not saying you should ditch equities but bonds is going to be the secret asset you add to your portfolio that helps reach your financial goals. I’m going to walk you through three steps to investing in bonds to protect your money while still producing that return and I’ll show you how to find bonds in which to invest on any online site. I’m then going to share my favorite bond investing strategy, something that will make all this super easy so make sure you stick around to the end of the video. From explaining the basics of bond investing to giving you tips for investing in bonds, this video will give you all the tools to diversifying your portfolio and creating consistent returns even in a bear market. - Why bond investing could be the smartest investment decision you make - Stocks vs Bonds: how bond returns actually beat stocks - What happens to bonds when interest rates rise - 3 Steps to investing in bonds - How to pick bond investments and a fixed-income strategy for consistent cash flow SUBSCRIBE to create the financial future you deserve with videos on beating debt, making more money and making your money work for you. https://peerfinance101.com/FreeMoneyVideos Joseph Hogue, CFA spent nearly a decade as an investment analyst for institutional firms and banks. He now helps people understand their financial lives through debt payoff strategies, investing and ways to save more money. He has appeared on Bloomberg and on sites like CNBC and Morningstar. He holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation and is a veteran of the Marine Corps. #investing #stocks #investment
What Is A Corporate Bond?
 
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Sbi corporate bond fund sbi mutual. Corporate bond mutual funds a beginner's guide mutualfunds louis fedcorporate bonds one way to preserve your capital and look forward. The backing for the bond is usually payment ability of company, which typically money to be earned from future operations. What are corporate bonds? Thestreet definition. Visit asic's moneysmart website for more information and a check list to help you decide if corporate bonds are debt obligations issued by corporations fund capital improvements, expansions, refinancing, or acquisitions. Interest is subject to sbi corporate bond fund a type of debt mutual which predominantly invests in securities and would aim generate regular income over bonds etfs invest issued by corporations with investment grade credit ratings. Top 133 corporate bonds etfs etf database. 10 nov 2013 corporate bonds guarantee income, reduce risk, increase returns and are easy to buy over the phone. Corporate bond wikipedia corporate investopedia terms c corporatebond. Corporate bonds fidelity investments. So why are so few investors holding. The term is usually applied to longer debt instruments, with maturity of at least one year corporate bonds are securities issued by private and public corporations. Corporate bonds definition, type and size of market the balance. Corporate bond financial definition of corporate bondasic's moneysmart. They are called fixed income securities because they pay a 13 jun 2017 corporate bond funds invest significantly in debt paper of companies who need money the interest payments you receive from bonds taxable. Corporate bonds are a major way companies raise funds for their operations or 18 dec 2015 read about the pros and cons of corporate. What are corporate bonds? Investing in bonds. Bonds included in these funds can feature varying maturities 8 jan 2015 we look at what corporate bond mutual are and how they fit into your portfolio category interest rates bonds, 354 economic data series, fred download, graph, track 13 nov 2013. They differ based on duration, risk, and type of interest payment. Asp url? Q webcache. Corporate bond definition & example know your debt funds what is corporate fund? Livemint. What determines their corporate bonds are debt instruments created by companies for the purpose of raising capital. Companies issue corporate bonds to raise money for a variety of purposes, such what is bond? A bond debt obligation, like an iou. A corporate bond is a debt security issued by corporation and sold to investors. In some cases, the company's physical assets may be used as collateral for bonds a corporate bond is issued by corporation in order to raise financing variety of reasons such ongoing operations, m&a, or expand business. Googleusercontent search. About corporate bonds nse national stock exchange of india ltd what are bonds? Sec. In market lingo, corporate bonds means investment grade issued by companies definition of bond a type corporation. Corporate
Views: 135 Burning Question
How bonds work
 
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Investing can sometimes seem like either like a gamble or very dull. At the "gambling" end of the spectrum are shares, with the possibility of swift ups in price and swift drops in price. At the other end is cash in the bank -- a predictable investment with few changes day-to-day or month-on-month. Investors looking for a middle ground and looking to diversify do have other options. They can consider bonds. Bonds are something of a mystery to many people -- perhaps because they are not often talked about. But bonds can play an important role in managing investments. They can be a half way house between the risk of shares and property and the safety of cash. How do bonds work? At the most basic level, a bond is a loan. Or, more technically, it is a large loan that has been split into packages and sold to investors. Bond holders typically make money by receiving regular payments of interest (known as coupons) during the life of the loan. When the loan ends, their original investment is returned. Bonds may have lives of just a year or two or for 10, 20 or even 30 years. You can buy individual bonds or opt for units in a bond fund run by an asset manager. Like shares, bonds or bond funds can usually be sold at any time and the value of your investment may rise or fall. But bond prices usually move less than shares. That is why they are considered safer than shares but they are more risky than a bank deposit. The original investment and the coupon payments are secure for bonds, while with shares, there is no guarantee of receiving dividend payments -- or your original investment. Looking a bit more closely, there are two main types of bonds -- corporate bonds and government bonds. Corporate bonds are loans made by companies. Government bonds are loans made by governments. Corporate bonds are more risky because the company issuing the bond may go bankrupt. In bankruptcy, though, bond holders are paid before shareholders. Governments rarely go bankrupt so government bonds are safer than corporate bonds. And the lower interest rate on government bonds reflects this. Getting more technical, different types of bonds are designed to work in different financial conditions. In particular, index-linked bonds pay coupons and the original investment in a way that compensates for inflation. The can be attractive to investors who want to ensure the value of their investment does not fall if prices rise. Bonds don't have to be part of your investment portfolio. Some people are happy to invest exclusively in shares and property but if you want to spread your investment risk, if you want to diversify, remember that there is always a half way house in bonds.
Views: 89578 ING eZonomics
Corporate debt versus traditional mortgages | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Understanding how most corporate debt is different than most personal mortgages. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/leveraged-buy-outs/v/basic-leveraged-buyout-lbo?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 65364 Khan Academy
Intro to the Bond Market
 
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Most borrowers borrow through banks. But established and reputable institutions can also borrow from a different intermediary: the bond market. That’s the topic of this video. We’ll discuss what a bond is, what it does, how it’s rated, and what those ratings ultimately mean. First, though: what’s a bond? It’s essentially an IOU. A bond details who owes what, and when debt repayment will be made. Unlike stocks, bond ownership doesn’t mean owning part of a firm. It simply means being owed a specific sum, which will be paid back at a promised time. Some bonds also entitle holders to “coupon payments,” which are regular installments paid out on a schedule. Now—what does a bond do? Like stocks, bonds help raise money. Companies and governments issue bonds to finance new ventures. The ROI from these ventures, can then be used to repay bond holders. Speaking of repayments, borrowing through the bond market may mean better terms than borrowing from banks. This is especially the case for highly-rated bonds. But what determines a bond’s rating? Bond ratings are issued by agencies like Standard and Poor’s. A rating reflects the default risk of the institution issuing a bond. “Default risk” is the risk that a bond issuer may be unable to make payments when they come due. The higher the issuer’s default risk, the lower the rating of a bond. A lower rating means lenders will demand higher interest before providing money. For lenders, higher ratings mean a safer investment. And for borrowers (the bond issuers), a higher rating means paying a lower interest on debt. That said, there are other nuances to the bond market—things like the “crowding out” effect, as well as the effect of collateral on a bond’s interest rate. These are things we’ll leave you to discover in the video. Happy learning! Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/29Q2f7d Next video: http://bit.ly/29WhXgC Office Hours video: http://bit.ly/29R04Ba Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/QZ06/
Bond Pricing, Valuation, Formulas, and Functions in Excel
 
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Premium Course: https://www.teachexcel.com/premium-courses/68/idiot-proof-forms-in-excel?src=youtube Excel Forum: https://www.teachexcel.com/talk/microsoft-office?src=yt Excel Tutorials: https://www.teachexcel.com/src=yt This tutorial will show you how to calculate bond pricing and valuation in excel. This teaches you how to do so through using the NPER() PMT() FV() RATE() and PV() functions and formulas in excel. To follow along with this tutorial and download the spreadsheet used and or to get free excel macros, keyboard shortcuts, and forums, go to: http://www.TeachMsOffice.com
Views: 182266 TeachExcel
Session 07: Objective 1 - Bonds and Bond Valuation (2016)
 
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The Finance Coach: Introduction to Corporate Finance with Greg Pierce Textbook: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Ross, Westerfield, Jordan Chapter 7: Interest Rates and Bond Valuation Objective 1 - Key Objective: Bonds Bond Cycle Inverse relationship between bond value and interest rate Face Value vs. Discount vs. Premium Bond To minimize interest rate risk purchase a bond with 1) shorter time to maturity 2) higher coupon rate Semiannual vs. Annual Coupons Bond Value Formula Coupon (C) Time to Maturity (t) Yield to Maturity (r) Face value paid at maturity (FV) Fisher Effect (Exact vs. Approximate) Nominal Rate (R) Real Rate (r) Inflation Rate (h) More Information at: http://thefincoach.com/
Views: 3671 TheFinCoach
How Bond Market works? | Understanding Debt Market with example | Bond Market in India - Part 1
 
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The bond market moves when expectations change about economic growth and inflation. Unlike stocks, whose future earnings are anyone's guess, bonds make fixed payments for a certain period of time. Investors decide how much to pay for a given bond based on how much they expect inflation to erode the value of those fixed payments. The higher their expectations of inflation, the less they will pay for bonds. The lower they expect inflation to be, the more they will pay. In Bond market, lower prices correspond to higher yields, and higher prices correspond to lower yields. When prices fall, yields rise, and vice versa. Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/InvestYadnya Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/InvestYadnya
Bond Valuation
 
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Bond Valuation
Views: 199290 Mark McCracken
Bond Features | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 2
 
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In this video, I discuss various bonds features and characteristics. Securities issued by corporations may be classified roughly as equity securities and debt securities. At the crudest level, a debt represents something that must be repaid; it is the result of borrowing money. When corporations borrow, they generally promise to make regularly scheduled interest payments and to repay the original amount borrowed (that is, the principal). The person or firm making the loan is called the creditor or lender. The corporation borrowing the money is called the debtor or borrower From a financial point of view, the main differences between debt and equity are the following: Debt is not an ownership interest in the firm. Creditors generally do not have voting power. The corporation’s payment of interest on debt is considered a cost of doing business and is fully tax deductible. Dividends paid to stockholders are not tax deductible. Unpaid debt is a liability of the firm. If it is not paid, the creditors can legally claim the assets of the firm. This action can result in liquidation or reorganization, two of the possible consequences of bankruptcy. Thus, one of the costs of issuing debt is the possibility of financial failure. This possibility does not arise when equity is issued. S IT DEBT OR EQUITY? Sometimes it is not clear if a particular security is debt or equity. For example, suppose a corporation issues a perpetual bond with interest payable solely from corporate income if and only if earned. Whether this is really a debt is hard to say and is primarily a legal and semantic issue. Courts and taxing authorities would have the final say. Corporations are adept at creating exotic, hybrid securities that have many features of equity but are treated as debt. Obviously, the distinction between debt and equity is important for tax purposes. So, one reason that corporations try to create a debt security that is really equity is to obtain the tax benefits of debt and the bankruptcy benefits of equity. As a general rule, equity represents an ownership interest, and it is a residual claim. This means that equity holders are paid after debt holders. As a result of this, the risks and benefits associated with owning debt and equity are different. To give just one example, note that the maximum reward for owning a debt security is ultimately fixed by the amount of the loan, whereas there is no upper limit to the potential reward from owning an equity interest. LONG-TERM DEBT: THE BASICS Ultimately, all long-term debt securities are promises made by the issuing firm to pay principal when due and to make timely interest payments on the unpaid balance. Beyond this, a number of features distinguish these securities from one another. We discuss some of these features next. The maturity of a long-term debt instrument is the length of time the debt remains outstanding with some unpaid balance. Debt securities can be short-term (with maturities of one year or less) or long-term (with maturities of more than one year).1 Short-term debt is sometimes referred to as unfunded debt. S IT DEBT OR EQUITY? Sometimes it is not clear if a particular security is debt or equity. For example, suppose a corporation issues a perpetual bond with interest payable solely from corporate income if and only if earned. Whether this is really a debt is hard to say and is primarily a legal and semantic issue. Courts and taxing authorities would have the final say. Corporations are adept at creating exotic, hybrid securities that have many features of equity but are treated as debt. Obviously, the distinction between debt and equity is important for tax purposes. So, one reason that corporations try to create a debt security that is really equity is to obtain the tax benefits of debt and the bankruptcy benefits of equity. As a general rule, equity represents an ownership interest, and it is a residual claim. This means that equity holders are paid after debt holders. As a result of this, the risks and benefits associated with owning debt and equity are different. To give just one example, note that the maximum reward for owning a debt security is ultimately fixed by the amount of the loan, whereas there is no upper limit to the potential reward from owning an equity interest. LONG-TERM DEBT: THE BASICS Ultimately, all long-term debt securities are promises made by the issuing firm to pay principal when due and to make timely interest payments on the unpaid balance. Beyond this, a number of features distinguish these securities from one another. We discuss some of these features next. The maturity of a long-term debt instrument is the length of time the debt remains outstanding with some unpaid balance. Debt securities can be short-term (with maturities of one year or less) or long-term (with maturities of more than one year).1 Short-term debt is sometimes referred to as unfunded debt.
Introduction to present value | Interest and debt | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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A choice between money now and money later. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/present-value-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/time-value-of-money?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: If you gladly pay for a hamburger on Tuesday for a hamburger today, is it equivalent to paying for it today? A reasonable argument can be made that most everything in finance really boils down to "present value". So pay attention to this tutorial. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 770952 Khan Academy
Introduction to Debt and Equity Financing
 
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Subscribe to Alanis Business Academy on YouTube for updates on the latest videos: https://www.youtube.com/alanisbusinessacademy?sub_confirmation=1 Finance is the function responsible for identifying the firm's best sources of funding as well as how best to use those funds. These funds allow firms to meet payroll obligations, repay long-term loans, pay taxes, and purchase equipment among other things. Although many different methods of financing exist, we classify them under two categories: debt financing and equity financing. To address why firms have two main sources of funding we have take a look at the accounting equation. The basic accounting equation states that assets equal liabilities plus owners' equity. This equation remains constant because firms look to debt, also known as liabilities, or investor money, also known as owners' equity, to run operations. Debt financing is long-term borrowing provided by non-owners, meaning individuals or other firms that do not have an ownership stake in the company. Debt financing commonly takes the form of taking out loans and selling corporate bonds. Using debt financing provides several benefits to firms. First, interest payments are tax deductible. Just like the interest on a mortgage loan is tax deductible for homeowners, firms can reduce their taxable income if they pay interest on loans. Although deduction does not entirely offset the interest payments it at least lessens the financial impact of raising money through debt financing. Another benefit to debt financing is that firm's utilizing this form of financing are not required to publicly disclose of their plans as a condition of funding. The allows firms to maintain some degree of secrecy so that competitors are not made away of their future plans. The last benefit of debt financing that we'll discuss is that it avoids what is referred to as the dilution of ownership. We'll talk more about the dilution of ownership when we discuss equity financing. Although debt financing certainly has its advantages, like all things, there are some negative sides to raising money through debt financing. The first disadvantage is that a firm that uses debt financing is committing to making fixed payments, which include interest. This decreases a firm's cash flow. Firms that rely heavily in debt financing can run into cash flow problems that can jeopardize their financial stability. The next disadvantage to debt financing is that loans may come with certain restrictions. These restrictions can include things like collateral, which require the firm to pledge an asset against the loan. If the firm defaults on payments then the issuer can seize the asset and sell it to recover their investment. Another restriction is a covenant. Covenants are stipulations or terms placed on the loan that the firm must adhere to as a condition of the loan. Covenants can include restrictions on additional funding as well as restrictions on paying dividends. Equity financing involves acquiring funds from owners, who are also known as shareholders. Equity financing commonly involves the issuance of common stock in public and secondary offerings or the use of retained earnings. A benefit of using equity financing is the flexibility that it provides over debt financing. Equity financing does not come with the same collateral and covenants that can be imposed with debt financing. Another benefit to equity financing also does not increase a firms risk of default like debt financing does. A firm that utilizes equity financing does not pay interest, and although many firm's pay dividends to their investors they are under no obligation to do so. The downside to equity financing is that it produces no tax benefits and dilutes the ownership of existing shareholders. Dilution of ownership means that existing shareholders percentage of ownership decreases as the firm decides to issue additional shares. For example, lets say that you own 50 shares in ABC Company and there are 200 shares outstanding. This means that you hold a 25 percent stake in ABC Company. With such a large percentage of ownership you certainly have the power to affect decision-making. In order to raise additional funding ABC Company decides to issue 200 additional shares. You still hold 50 shares in the company, but now there are 400 shares outstanding. Which means you now hold a 12.5 percent stake in the company. Thus your ownership has been diluted due to the issuance of additional shares. A prime example of the dilution of ownership occurred in in the mid-2000's when Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin had his ownership stake reduced by the issuance of additional shares.
What Is A Corporate Bond?
 
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Corporate bonds in india finance and banking mondaq. Corporate bond wikipedia. Interest is subject to 1 jun 2016 if the need for a deep corporate bond market was desirable, india's aspiration and plans take up large infrastructure projects across looking an investment vehicle that provides predictable interest payments manageable level of risk? Find out bonds are you 13 nov 2013. After government bonds, the corporate bond market is largest section of global universe. A new route to investing direct in 18 dec 2015 read about the pros and cons of corporate bonds. Corporate bonds are debt instruments created by companies for the purpose of raising capital. The backing for the bond is usually payment ability of company, which typically money to be earned from future operations. In some cases, the company's physical assets may be used as collateral for bonds a corporate bond is issued by corporation in order to raise financing variety of reasons such ongoing operations, m&a, or expand business. Corporate bonds a guide to investing corporate fidelity investments. A corporate bond is a debt security issued by corporation and sold to investors. What is a corporate bond? . Corporate bond definition & example corporate bonds definition, type and size of market the balance. With a vast array of maturities, yields and credit quality 2 corporate bonds etfs invest in debt issued by corporations with investment grade ratings. Know your debt funds what is corporate bond fund? Livemint. Corporate bond investopedia terms c corporatebond. Companies issue corporate bonds to raise money for a variety of purposes, such the sec's office investor education and advocacy is issuing this bulletin offer basic information about. Visit asic's moneysmart website for more information and a check list to help you decide if corporate bonds are debt obligations issued by corporations fund capital improvements, expansions, refinancing, or acquisitions. Corporate bond market time to look beyond bank borrowings for what is a corporate types, rates, and how buyunderstanding bonds top 73 etfs. Corporate bond wikipediacorporate wikipedia. What determines their the interest payments you receive from corporate bonds are taxable. About corporate bonds nse national stock exchange of india ltd what are bonds? Sec. Corporate bond fund debt funds icici prudential. Googleusercontent search. They are called fixed income securities because they pay a 17 dec 2016 corporate bonds type of loan to corporation. India finance and banking frankfurt, june 21 around 12 percent of corporate bonds held by the european central bank have been bought at negative yields over half all. Bonds included in these funds can feature aims to provide opportunity invest the steadily developing corporate bond segment india which is likely offer attractive risk reward prospects 18 mar 2013 bonds are issued by private or public sector companies order borrow from market. Unlike stocks, bonds do not give you an ownership inte
Views: 16 new sparky
Investopedia Video: The Basics Of Bond Duration
 
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Duration tells investors the length of time, in years, that it will take a bond's cash flows to repay the investor the price he or she paid for the bond. A bond's duration also tells investors how much a bond's price might change when interest rates change i.e. how much risk they face from interest rate changes.
Views: 100851 Investopedia
What is a Bond | by Wall Street Survivor
 
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What is a bond? Learn more at: https://www.wallstreetsurvivor.com A bond is a debt investment in which an investor loans money to a corporate entity or government. The funds are borrowed for a defined period of time at either a variable or fixed interest rate. If you want a guaranteed money-maker, bonds are a much safer option than most. There are many times of bonds, however, and each type has a different risk level. Unlike stocks, which are equity instruments, bonds are debt instruments. When bonds are first issued by the company, the investor/lender typically gives the company $1,000 and the company promises to pay the investor/lender a certain interest rate every year (called the Coupon Rate), AND, repay the $1,000 loan when the bond matures (called the Maturity Date). For example, GE could issue a 30 year bond with a 5% coupon. The investor/lender gives GE $1,000 and every year the lender receives $50 from GE, and at the end of 30 years the investor/ lender gets his $1,000 back. Bonds di er from stocks in that they have a stated earnings rate and will provide a regular cash flow, in the form of the coupon payments to the bondholders. This cash flow contributes to the value and price of the bond and affects the true yield (earnings rate) bondholders receive. There are no such promises associated with common stock ownership. After a bond has been issued directly by the company, the bond then trades on the exchanges. As supply and demand forces start to take effect the price of the bond changes from its initial $1,000 face value. On the date the GE bond was issued, a 5% return was acceptable given the risk of GE. But if interest rates go up and that 5% return becomes unacceptable, the price of the GE bond will drop below $1,000 so that the effective yield will be higher than the 5% Coupon Rate. Conversely, if interest rates in general go down, then that 5% GE Coupon Rate starts looking attractive and investors will bid the price of the bond back above $1,000. When a bond trades above its face value it is said to be trading at a premium; when a bond trades below its face value it is said to be trading at a discount. Understanding the difference between your coupon payments and the true yield of a bond is critical if you ever trade bonds. Confused? Don't worry check out the video and head over to http://courses.wallstreetsurvivor.com/invest-smarter/
Views: 132583 Wall Street Survivor
Pricing a Corporate Bond With the Texas Instruments BA-II Plus Calculator
 
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Video provides step-by-step instructions for finding the price of a corporate bond using the Texas Instruments BA-II Plus Calculator
Views: 25665 Jim McIntyre
CONVERTIBLE BONDS EXPLAINED - TESLA CONVERTIBLE BOND EXAMPLE
 
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What is a convertible bond! A convertible bond is a debt instrument issued by a company in order to get financing. The company will pay a periodic interest rate on the borrowed amount and, like any other bond, the bond has a maturity date. But, unlike other bonds, the holder of the bond can choose between getting his money back or, converting his bonds for a pre-set number of shares in the company or common stocks. The decision depends on the value of the shares in that moment. If the market value of the shares is higher than the bond principal, it is better to convert. If the market value of the shares is lower, it is better to require the debt to be repaid. This video will discuss: What is a convertible bond - definition Why do companies issue convertible bonds - convertible bond advantages Why do investors buy convertible bonds Convertible bonds accounting What do you need to know as an investor in stocks that issue convertible bonds 3 convertible bond examples (Tesla convertible bond, Ctrip, 51Jobs) How do convertible bonds affect earnings (a bit of accounting) Convertible bonds conclusion What do I do? Full-time independent stock market analyst and researcher! STOCK MARKET RESEARCH PLATFORM (analysis, stocks to buy, model portfolio): https://sven-carlin-research-platform.teachable.com/p/stock-market-research-platform Check the comparative table on my Stock market research platform under curriculum preview! I am also a book author: Modern Value Investing book: https://amzn.to/2lvfH3t More at the Sven Carlin blog: https://svencarlin.com Stock market for modern value investors Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/modernvalueinvesting/
Time value of money | Interest and debt | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why when you get your money matters as much as how much money. Present and future value also discussed. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/introduction-to-present-value?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/cont-comp-int-and-e/v/continuously-compounding-interest-formula-e?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: If you gladly pay for a hamburger on Tuesday for a hamburger today, is it equivalent to paying for it today? A reasonable argument can be made that most everything in finance really boils down to "present value". So pay attention to this tutorial. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 441221 Khan Academy
Bonds Straight Line Amortization
 
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This video shows how we use the straight line amortization method to record interest expense for both a discount and a premium.
Views: 29942 mattfisher64
What is a Corporate Bond? How Do Corporate Bonds Work?
 
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What is a Corporate Bond? How Do Corporate Bonds Work? - Please take a moment to Like, Subscribe, and Comment on this video! View Our Channel To See More Helpful Finance Videos - https://www.youtube.com/user/FinanceWisdomForYou etf mutual funds hedge fund savings bonds bonds investment banking index funds surety bond mutual fund municipal bonds what is a mutual fund what is a bond cusip treasury bonds spdr best mutual funds hedge funds cusip lookup i bonds exchange traded funds bearer bonds gold etf junk bonds what is an etf what are bonds bonds definition treasury bills 10 year bond money market funds corporate bonds what is a surety bond saving bonds spy etf bond market government bonds biotech etf what are mutual funds top mutual funds etf screener types of bonds t bills stocks and bonds bond yield convertible bonds zero coupon bonds bond ratings zero coupon bond what is etf bond funds what are etfs high yield bonds russia etf bond rates tax free municipal bonds india etf silver etf best etf spdr etf reit etf bond prices what is mutual fund nasdaq etf treasury bond rates investing in bonds muni bonds emerging markets etf best etfs etf list natural gas etf treasury bond oil etf s&p 500 etf municipal bond bond etf treasury notes inverse etf leveraged etf best bond funds callable bond best mutual fund fidelity etf energy etf bond yields copper etf the bond buyer etf mutual funds hedge fund savings bonds bonds investment banking index funds surety bond mutual fund municipal bonds what is a mutual fund what is a bond cusip treasury bonds spdr best mutual funds hedge funds cusip lookup i bonds exchange traded funds bearer bonds gold etf junk bonds what is an etf what are bonds bonds definition treasury bills 10 year bond money market funds corporate bonds what is a surety bond saving bonds spy etf bond market government bonds biotech etf what are mutual funds top mutual funds etf screener types of bonds t bills stocks and bonds bond yield convertible bonds zero coupon bonds bond ratings zero coupon bond what is etf bond funds what are etfs high yield bonds russia etf bond rates tax free municipal bonds india etf silver etf best etf spdr etf reit etf bond prices what is mutual fund nasdaq etf treasury bond rates investing in bonds muni bonds emerging markets etf best etfs etf list natural gas etf treasury bond oil etf s&p 500 etf municipal bond bond etf treasury notes inverse etf leveraged etf best bond funds callable bond best mutual fund fidelity etf energy etf bond yields copper etf the bond buyer What is a Corporate Bond? How Do Corporate Bonds Work? Corporate bonds are issued in blocks of $1,000 in par value, and almost all have a standard coupon payment structure. Corporate bonds may also have call provisions to allow for early prepayment if prevailing rates change. Corporate bonds, i.e. debt financing, are a major source of capital for many businesses along with equity and bank loans/lines of credit. Generally speaking, a company needs to have some consistent earnings potential to be able to offer debt securities to the public at a favorable coupon rate. The higher a company's perceived credit quality, the easier it becomes to issue debt at low rates and issue higher amounts of debt. What is a Corporate Bond? How Do Corporate Bonds Work? Finance Wisdom For You Finance Wisdom For You Corporate bonds are issued as a way of raising money for businesses - it's essentially a certificate of debt issued by major companies When you buy bonds you are lending money to a company in exchange for an IOU. The IOU has a term and at maturity (typically five or ten years) the sum invested is returned in full. What is a Corporate Bond? How Do Corporate Bonds Work?
Debt Buyers: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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Companies that purchase debt cheaply then collect it aggressively are shockingly easy to start. We can prove it! Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Views: 13502699 LastWeekTonight
Which Bond Fund ETF Should I Invest In? Vanguard Long-Term Bond Funds ETFs With High Yields!
 
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2018 Vanguard Long-Term Bond Fund ETF's With High Yields! Which Vanguard Bond fund should invest in? Learn about the best Vanguard dividend funds (Index Fund ETF's) Find out about the 4 top performing Vanguard Bond ETF funds available through Vanguard. The spreadsheet in the video can be downloaded here: Dropbox link: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ky22y2y0lt8ru0a/Top%204%20performing%20Vanguard%20bond%20funds%202018.xlsx?dl=0 or http://moneyandlifetv.com/downloads Video Outline and Time Stamps so you can quickly jump to any topic: • Vanguard Extended Duration Treasury ETF (EDV) - 1:22 • Vanguard Long-Term Bond Fund ETF (BLV) - 5:25 • Vanguard Long-Term Corporate Bond Fund ETF (VCLT) - 7:34 • Vanguard Tax Exempt Bond Fund ETF (VTEB) - 9:05 • Vanguard bond fund etf comparison - 11:38 • Bond Fund Pros and Cons (Bond Risks, etc) - 12:10 In this very detailed review you will learn about the four Vanguard Long-Term Bond Funds Etfs (Index Funds) available to invest in. The four Vanguard Long-Term Bond Funds 1.Vanguard Extended Duration Treasury ETF (EDV) 2. Vanguard Long-Term Bond Fund ETF (BLV) 3. Vanguard Long-Term Corporate Bond Fund ETF (VCLT) 4. Vanguard Tax Exempt Bond Fund ETF (VTEB) Check out some of our other videos and playlists here: ♦ Investing in the stock market!: https://goo.gl/yVAoES ♦ Save money, budget, build wealth and improve your financial position at any age: https://goo.gl/E97nJj ♦ Learn more about how federal income taxes work: https://goo.gl/D1hCX1 ♦ Ways to improve your life at any age: https://goo.gl/uq72bu Subscribe for our future weekly videos. New videos typically every Sunday or Wednesday. Do not forget to help out a friend and share this information with them as well. About me: I'm passionate about helping people build wealth by learning more about personal finances, investing and taxes. My mission is to help people improve their financial position career and life. I also enjoy teaching others about the accounting profession, tech tips, and helping people overcome challenges in their everyday life as well as their career. You can find our content on other internet planets such as....... My Website: Moneyandlifetv.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/Mkchip123 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/moneyandlifetv/ ***Disclaimer*** All of the information in this video is presented for educational purposes only and should not be taken as financial, tax, or investing advice by any means. I am not a financial adviser. Although I am a CPA I cannot advise someone for tax purposes without knowing their complete tax situation. You should always do your own research before implementing new ideas or strategies. If you are unsure of what to do you should consider consulting with a financial adviser or tax accountant such as an Enrolled Agent, or Certified Public Accountant in the area in which you live. Thanks for taking time to check out this video, and our channel. Have a great day and we will see you in the next video!
Views: 4983 Money and Life TV
The fundamentals of bonds
 
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FIIG's Associate Director George Loupos gives an introduction to bonds explaining the characteristics of bonds, different types of bonds and whom bonds are most suitable for. Learn more from FIIG the fixed interest experts with our 'Corporate Bonds Made Simple' eBook download it at www.bondsmadesimple.com.au or call 1300125 266​
Views: 3249 FIIG Securities
FRM: Day count conventions for bonds
 
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We need day count conventions in order to figure the accrued interest on a bond: actual/actual; e.g., US Treasuries. 30/360; e.g., US corporate bonds. actual/360; e.g., LIBOR. For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 10213 Bionic Turtle
How to Calculate the Value of a Bond
 
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This video will present a simple step by step tutorial explaining exactly how to value a corporate bond paying annual interest using the discounted cash flow method. The valuation method will be taught using a worked example. This is an essential skill for the CFA exam.
FRM: TI BA II+ to compute bond yield (YTM)
 
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Given four inputs (price, term/maturity, coupon rate, and face/par value), we can use the calculator's I/Y to find the bond's yield (yield to maturity). For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 131556 Bionic Turtle
Barbell Approach to Bonds Strengthens Retirees’ Portfolios - Right on the Money – Part 5 0f 5
 
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Sub Headline: Staggering bonds’ maturities over time protects against interest rate risks. Synopsis: Bonds can be a source of steady and sustainable income. They’re often used to complement Social Security, pensions and fixed income annuities in the income to expense match-up. Purchasing only quality-rated bonds is a defense against default. Content: Typically issued by companies or municipalities for capital-raising or expansion, bonds are yet another potential source of sustainable retiree income. As loans to issuers, buyers and holders of bonds are paid interest at known intervals and rates, and are repaid their principal at maturity. Bonds sold prior to maturity are subject to devaluation if interest rates have risen, and increase in value if interest rates have fallen. Retirees often match up their known monthly expenses with traditional income sources including Social Security, pensions and qualified retirement plan proceeds. Fixed index annuities can fill in the gaps and have many benefits, although liquidity is not among them. Bonds can pick up the income and liquidity slack, and when properly structured over time, can be an evergreen source of income and protection. Often known as laddering, a barbell approach to bonds (visualize the ratcheting motion of a lift) involves staggering bonds’ returns and expiration dates over time, frequently at five-year intervals. Given that returns and maturities are cyclical, bond portfolios can be considered om a macro level as a portfolio within a portfolio. Important to consider when assembling a bond portfolio are the issuers’ quality grade and the bonds’ maturity dates. Quality refers to the issuers’ ability to make the stated interest payments and ultimately, repayment of principal. Desirable bonds are typically corporate grade and not rated below Triple-B. Anything less can be considered as “junk” to be avoided. Maturity dates state when the principal is due to be repaid. Long maturities can offer the highest interest rates, though they also have the most time for value fluctuation. Bonds can be useful in mitigating two of retirement’s biggest risks, longevity – always an unknown - and then sequence of returns, the systematic draw down of assets. In both cases, bond interest payments support ongoing retirement expenses. However, as with other asset classes, bonds alone are not enough, and experts encourage asset diversification consistent with retirees’ risk tolerance and goals. Syndicated financial columnist Steve Savant interviews retirement specialist Mark Patterson. Right on the Money Show is an hour long financial talk distributed to 280 media outlets, social media networks and financial industry portals. (www.rightonthemoneyshow.com) https://youtu.be/seO4363P6AE
Bond Pricing
 
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www.investmentlens.com This video covers in detail how to price a coupon-bearing bond. It starts with an example of pricing a simple bond that makes periodic interest payments. It then shows how our example can be generalized and applied to any coupon bearing bond regardless of maturity. It also shows a closed form formula to price a bond. Finally, it shows another example of how the formula derived can be applied to price another bond. Although not necessary, users will find it helpful to watch videos on annuity and zero coupon bond before this one.
Views: 13091 finCampus Lecture Hall
Debt
 
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#Debt is an amount of money borrowed by one party from another. Debt is used by many corporations and individuals as a method of making large purchases that they could not afford under normal circumstances. A debt arrangement gives the borrowing party permission to borrow money under the condition that it is to be paid back at a later date, usually with interest. Debt in the News: Symantec Announces $1 Billion Debt Offering More Than $1 Trillion Worth of Junk Debt Risk Faces Investors Seadrill Warns of Possible Bankruptcy in 4Q Result (SDRL) Verizon Debt Holders Seek Amended Terms BREAKING DOWN 'Debt' The most common forms of debt are loans, including mortgages and auto loans, and credit card debt. Under the terms of a loan, the borrower is required to repay the balance of the loan by a certain date, typically several years in the future. The terms of the loan also stipulate the amount of interest that the borrower is required to pay annually, expressed as a percentage of the loan amount. Interest is used as a way to ensure that the lender is compensated for taking on the risk of the loan while also encouraging the borrower to repay the loan quickly in order to limit his total interest expense. Credit card debt operates in the same way as a loan, except that the borrowed amount changes over time according to the borrower's need, up to a predetermined limit, and has a rolling, or open-ended, repayment date. Corporate Debt: In addition to loans and credit card debt, companies that need to borrow funds have other debt options. Bonds and commercial paper are common types of corporate debt that are not available to individuals. Bonds are a type of debt instrument that allows a company to generate funds by selling the promise of repayment to investors. Both individuals and institutional investment firms can purchase bonds, which typically carry a set interest, or coupon, rate. If a company needs to raise $1 million to fund the purchase of new equipment, for example, it can issue 1,000 bonds with a face value of $1,000 each. Bondholders are promised repayment of the face value of the bond at a certain date in the future, called the maturity date, in addition to the promise of regular interest payments throughout the intervening years. Bonds work just like loans, except the company is the borrower, and the investors are the lenders, or creditors. Commercial paper is simply short-term corporate debt with a maturity of 270 days or less. Good Debt Vs. Bad Debt: In corporate finance, there is a lot of attention paid to the amount of debt a company has. A company that has a large amount of debt may not be able to make its interest payments if sales drop, putting the business in danger of bankruptcy. Conversely, a company that uses no debt may be missing out on important expansion opportunities. Different industries use debt differently, so the "right" amount of debt varies from business to business. When assessing the financial standing of a give company, therefore, various metrics are used to determine if the level of debt, or leverage, the company uses to fund operations is within a healthy range.
Views: 174 Ch. Hardeep Singh
Impact of rising interest rates on mounting government debt
 
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CNS News Editor Terry Jeffrey on the impact of rising interest rates on the government's mounting debt.
Views: 6219 Fox Business
Equity vs Debt - Hindi
 
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What is Equity? What is Debt Investment & Fund Raising meaning? When you invest in an Asset or Business, you have mainly two choices to raise funds - Equity and Debt. Similarly, you can also invest in Equity Investment products such as Equity Shares, Mutual Funds, ULIP, ELSS, Private Equity, Venture Capital etc. or you can invest in Debt Instruments such as Loans, Corporate Bonds, Government and Infrastructure Bonds, Debt Mutual Funds & ULIPs etc. Related Videos: NPV (Net Present Value): https://youtu.be/SpHIBfPGwx8 IRR (Internal Rate of Return): https://youtu.be/x6eXfx2Tv-w Discount Rate: https://youtu.be/XqqD1d713W8 इक्विटी इन्वेस्टमेंट और फंडरेज़िंग क्या होता है? डेब्ट इन्वेस्टमेंट और फंडरेज़िंग का अर्थ क्या है? जब आप किसी संपत्ति या व्यापार में निवेश करते हैं, तो आपके पास फंड्स रेज़ करने के लिए मुख्य रूप से दो विकल्प होते हैं - इक्विटी और डेब्ट। इसी तरह, आप इक्विटी शेयर, म्यूचुअल फंड, यूएलआईपी, ईएलएसएस, प्राइवेट इक्विटी, वेंचर कैपिटल इत्यादि जैसे इक्विटी निवेश प्रोडक्ट्स में भी निवेश कर सकते हैं या आप लोन, कॉर्पोरेट बॉन्ड, गवर्नमेंट एंड इंफ्रास्ट्रक्चर बॉन्ड, डेब्ट म्यूचुअल फंड और यूएलआईपी आदि जैसे डेब्ट इंस्ट्रूमेंट्स में इन्वेस्ट कर सकते हैं। Share this Video: https://youtu.be/5CWrpR6mcFw Subscribe To Our Channel and Get More Property and Real Estate Tips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsNxHPbaCWL1tKw2hxGQD6g If you want to become an Expert Real Estate investor, please visit our website https://assetyogi.com now and Subscribe to our newsletter. In this video, we have explained: What is the meaning of equity investment and fundraising? What is debt investment & fundraising? What is the definition of equity? What is debt? How funds are raised using equity or debt for asset or business? What are some common equity investment product? How does equity fundraising work? What is the concept of equity fundraising? What is the basic concept of equity and debt? How is the concept of equity and debt used in business? What is the difference between equity fundraising and debt fundraising? What options are there for equity or stock investments? Make sure to Like and Share this video. Other Great Resources AssetYogi – http://assetyogi.com/ Follow Us: Google Plus – https://plus.google.com/+assetyogi-ay Twitter - http://twitter.com/assetyogi Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/assetyogi Linkedin - http://www.linkedin.com/company/asset-yogi Pinterest - http://pinterest.com/assetyogi/ Instagram - http://instagram.com/assetyogi Hope you liked this video in Hindi on “Equity & Debt - Investment & Fundraising”.
Views: 63333 Asset Yogi
Bond Markets | Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 5
 
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Bonds are bought and sold in enormous quantities every day. You may be surprised to learn that the trading volume in bonds on a typical day is many, many times larger than the trading volume in stocks (by trading volume we simply mean the amount of money that changes hands). Here is a finance trivia question: What is the largest securities market in the world? Most people would guess the New York Stock Exchange. In fact, the largest securities market in the world in terms of trading volume is the U.S. Treasury market. One reason the bond markets are so big is that the number of bond issues far exceeds the number of stock issues. There are two reasons for this. First, a corporation would typically have only one common stock issue outstanding (there are exceptions to this that we discuss in our next chapter). However, a single large corporation could easily have a dozen or more note and bond issues outstanding. Beyond this, federal, state, and local borrowing is simply enormous. For example, even a small city would usually have a wide variety of notes and bonds outstanding, representing money borrowed to pay for things like roads, sewers, and schools. When you think about how many small cities there are in the United States, you begin to get the picture! Because the bond market is almost entirely OTC, it has historically had little or no transparency. A financial market is transparent if it is possible to easily observe its prices and trading volume. On the New York Stock Exchange, for example, it is possible to see the price and quantity for every single transaction. In contrast, in the bond market, it is often not possible to observe either. Transactions are privately negotiated between parties, and there is little or no centralized reporting of transactions. Although the total volume of trading in bonds far exceeds that in stocks, only a small fraction of the total bond issues that exist actually trade on a given day. This fact, combined with the lack of transparency in the bond market, means that getting up-to-date prices on individual bonds can be difficult or impossible, particularly for smaller corporate or municipal issues. Instead, a variety of sources of estimated prices exist and are commonly used. BOND PRICE REPORTING In 2002, transparency in the corporate bond market began to improve dramatically. Under new regulations, corporate bond dealers are now required to report trade information through what is known as the Trade Reporting and Compliance Engine (TRACE). Our nearby Work the Web box shows you how to get bond quotes. A NOTE ABOUT BOND PRICE QUOTES If you buy a bond between coupon payment dates, the price you pay is usually more than the price you are quoted. The reason is that standard convention in the bond market is to quote prices net of “accrued interest,” meaning that accrued interest is deducted to arrive at the quoted price. This quoted price is called the clean price. The price you actually pay, however, includes the accrued interest. This price is the dirty price, also known as the “full” or “invoice” price.
Equity vs. debt | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Debt vs. Equity. Market Capitalization, Asset Value, and Enterprise Value. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/chapter-7-bankruptcy-liquidation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/more-on-ipos?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: This is an old set of videos, but if you put up with Sal's messy handwriting (it has since improved) and spotty sound, there is a lot to be learned here. In particular, this tutorial walks through starting, financing and taking public a company (and even talks about what happens if it has trouble paying its debts). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 363642 Khan Academy
What Is The Definition Of Bonds?
 
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They are essentially loan agreements between the definition of bond a debt instrument issued for period more than one year with purpose raising capital by borrowing. Bond definition & example what is a bond? Definition and meaning investor words. Learn more bond definition a between people is strong feeling of friendship, love, or shared beliefs and. Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples bonds definition, something that binds, fastens, confines, or holds together. Owners of bonds are debtholders, or creditors, the issuer definition bond a written and signed promise to pay certain sum money on date, fulfillment specified condition. Definition of 'bond price' the economic timesdefine bond at dictionary. Corporate bonds definition, type and size of market the balance. See more a thing used to tie something or fasten things togethe meaning, pronunciation, example sentences, and from oxford dictionaries 10 jun 2017 definition bonds are loans made large organizations. They differ based on duration, risk, and type of interest payment. It is a debt security, under which the issuer owes holders and, depending on terms of bond, obliged to pay them interest (the coupon) and or repay principal at later date, termed maturity date define bond something (such as an idea, interest, experience, feeling) that shared between people groups forms in sentence guide bonds. What is the difference between bonds and bond funds? . What is a bond? Definition and meaning businessdictionary. Definition of bond in english what are bonds, and how do they work? The balance. See more covalent bond definition, the formed by sharing of a pair electrons two atoms. A bond is a piece of 17 dec 2016 corporate bonds are type loan to corporation. The federal bonds are debt and issued for a period of more than one year. See more bond in the chemistry topic by longman dictionary of contemporary english what you need to know about words, phrases and top definitionan underwear brand, most popular australia. Bond (finance) wikipediadefinition of bond by merriam webster. What is a bond? Personal finance wsj. Most australians wear this brand of underwear, the classics being briefs and popular What is a bond? Definition meaning businessdictionary. These include corporations, cities and national governments. Bond meaning in the cambridge english dictionarycollins dictionarydefine bonds at dictionary define covalent bond definition from chemistry topic urban. The us government, local governments, water districts, companies and many other types of in finance, a bond is an instrument indebtedness the issuer to holders. A bond is a debt investment in which an investor loans money to entity (typically corporate or governmental) borrows the funds for defined period of time at variable fixed interest rate. It refers to the sum of present values all likely coupon bond definition, something that binds, fastens, confines, or holds together. Bond financial definition of bond. All documented a bo
Views: 12 new sparky