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Generalizing a 1:250 000 National Topographic Map at Natural Resources Canada
 
21:32
Watch how National Resources Canada uses FME to integrate their geographic and cartographic data and then generalize it to meet their needs.
Views: 361 FME Channel
Industrial Regions of North America (USA, Canada)
 
03:22
Major industrial belts of USA and Canada produces manufacturing, mechanical, electrical, aircraft, food, beverages and heavy industry products. These places are rich in natural resources that supports their huge economy. Places in USA are - Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New York , Baltimore. New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburg, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago , Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Mississippi, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, Washington, Or¬egon, California, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Places in Canada are:- Quebec, Ontario, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Manitoba, Winnipeg, and Edmonton, Alberta, Vancouver and British Columbia. --- Please give me your feedback & other suggestions https://drive.google.com/open?id=18COyCaggEQFEr1JuaA6tJ4X-mpppwY8rFuEKlCWbWkU Get the map here:- http://aksgb.blogspot.in/2016/09/industrial-regions-of-north-america.html Click here if you want to subscribe to the channel:- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRealSengupta You can also view playlists of other NCERT Geography videos:- Class 6 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAZP9UNB2Vo&list=PL1vNLZF5gfwcc9Kw-n1D8wwBtT5wIKXwH Class 7 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Whz0leipCoI&list=PL1vNLZF5gfwcGsXgJnz9dTp5XE5L3d1d2 Class 8 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIrwdEexG2M&list=PL1vNLZF5gfwc7iHqozmofc_leWu00HLo5 Class 9 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuDbizd_W6k&list=PL1vNLZF5gfweFN0ps77y2jdFp7hTxl2sK Class 10 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTT_dXVbJ40&list=PL1vNLZF5gfweoo1UZYY3hF2e0UxXuf7lD Class 11 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NntksyX70uk&list=PL1vNLZF5gfwdhB7PRkMZ0sWfhV07AT6Z_ Class 12 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9wWJCHJM6M&list=PL1vNLZF5gfweoiGYv6d5uc6CjVY1VDAWJ
Views: 20074 Amit Sengupta
The World Without Canada (Natural Resources) Season 1, Episode 2
 
44:11
Natural Resources Canada's glorious natural resources stabilize, feed and fuel the World. Remove Canada from globe and the repercussions are catastrophic.
Views: 11081 Canada Strong
Resources: Welcome to the Neighborhood - Crash Course Kids #2.1
 
03:15
Welcome to the Neighborhood! Humans need a lot of things to survive (I'm sure you've noticed). We need food, water, and shelter and it takes a lot of resources to get all of those things. What are resources? In this episode of Crash Course Kids, Sabrina talks about what resources are and how we use them. And you might be surprised where all of it starts. This first series is based on 5th grade science. We're super excited and hope you enjoy Crash Course Kids! ///Standards Used in This Video/// 5-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Crash Course Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/crashcourse Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/CrashCourseKids Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Credits... Executive Producers: John & Hank Green Producer: Nicholas Jenkins Cinematographer & Director: Michael Aranda Editor: Nicholas Jenkins Script Supervisor: Mickie Halpern Writer: Ben Kessler Consultant: Shelby Alinsky Script Editor: Blake de Pastino Thought Cafe Team: Stephanie Bailis Cody Brown Suzanna Brusikiewicz Jonathan Corbiere Nick Counter Kelsey Heinrichs Jack Kenedy Corey MacDonald Tyler Sammy Nikkie Stinchcombe James Tuer Adam Winnik
Views: 214956 Crash Course Kids
North America- Natural Resources
 
13:50
This animation describes the continent of North America in terms of its natural resources. This is a product of Mexus Education Pvt. Ltd., an education innovations company based in Mumbai, India. http://www.mexuseducation.com, http://www.ikenstore.in
Views: 31812 Iken Edu
Israel's Geographic Challenge
 
02:21
Stratfor explains Israel's primary geographic challenge rooted in its dearth of natural resources and lack of strategic depth. About Stratfor: Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. For individual and enterprise subscriptions to Stratfor Worldview, our online publication, visit us at: https://worldview.stratfor.com/ And make sure to connect with Stratfor on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/stratfor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stratfor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/stra... YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stratfor Learn more about Stratfor here: https://www.Stratfor.com Get the latest company news here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons Or review and purchase our longform reports on geopolitics here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons And listen to the Stratfor podcast for free here: iTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/s... Stitcher - http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/strat... Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/stratfortalks Libsyn - http://stratfor.libsyn.com/ To subscribe to Stratfor Worldview, click here: https://worldview.stratfor.com/subscribe Join Stratfor Worldview to cut through the noise and make sense of an increasingly complicated world. Membership to Stratfor Worldview includes: Unrestricted access to Stratfor Worldview's latest insights, podcasts, videos, and more. Members-only community forums. My Collections - your personal library of Stratfor insights saved for later reading. Discounts to our long-form reports on the Stratfor Store.
Views: 446795 Stratfor
Norway's Geographic Challenge
 
02:16
Stratfor discusses how Norway needs to secure interests in the north, which is important for its natural reserves and potential trade routes. About Stratfor: Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. For individual and enterprise subscriptions to Stratfor Worldview, our online publication, visit us at: https://worldview.stratfor.com/ And make sure to connect with Stratfor on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/stratfor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stratfor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/stratfor YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stratfor Learn more about Stratfor here: https://www.Stratfor.com Get the latest company news here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons Or review and purchase our longform reports on geopolitics here: https://store.stratfor.com And listen to the Stratfor podcast for free here: iTunes - http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Podcast_iTunes Stitcher - http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/stratfor-talks Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/stratfortalks Libsyn - http://stratfor.libsyn.com/ Download the All New Mobile App for Stratfor. You can also access Stratfor Worldview Content in the App when you are offline. Free Download for iOS (from Apple App Store): http://bit.ly/Statfor_Mobile_App_for_Apple_Devices Free Download for Android (from Google Play Store): http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Mobile_App_for_Android_Devices To subscribe to Stratfor Worldview, click here: https://worldview.stratfor.com/subscribe Join Stratfor Worldview to cut through the noise and make sense of an increasingly complicated world. Membership to Stratfor Worldview includes: Unrestricted access to Stratfor Worldview's latest insights, podcasts, videos, and more. Members-only community forums. My Collections - your personal library of Stratfor insights saved for later reading. Discounts to our long-form reports on the Stratfor Store.
Views: 169200 Stratfor
Argentina's Geographic Challenge
 
02:00
Stratfor explains how Argentina's geographic position and natural resources have made it relatively safe from outside powers but have created internal political challenges. About Stratfor: Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. For individual and enterprise subscriptions to Stratfor Worldview, our online publication, visit us at: https://worldview.stratfor.com/ And make sure to connect with Stratfor on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/stratfor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stratfor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/stratfor YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stratfor Learn more about Stratfor here: https://www.Stratfor.com Get the latest company news here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons Or review and purchase our longform reports on geopolitics here: https://store.stratfor.com And listen to the Stratfor podcast for free here: iTunes - http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Podcast_iTunes Stitcher - http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/stratfor-talks Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/stratfortalks Libsyn - http://stratfor.libsyn.com/ Download the All New Mobile App for Stratfor. You can also access Stratfor Worldview Content in the App when you are offline. Free Download for iOS (from Apple App Store): http://bit.ly/Statfor_Mobile_App_for_Apple_Devices Free Download for Android (from Google Play Store): http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Mobile_App_for_Android_Devices To subscribe to Stratfor Worldview, click here: https://worldview.stratfor.com/subscribe Join Stratfor Worldview to cut through the noise and make sense of an increasingly complicated world. Membership to Stratfor Worldview includes: Unrestricted access to Stratfor Worldview's latest insights, podcasts, videos, and more. Members-only community forums. My Collections - your personal library of Stratfor insights saved for later reading. Discounts to our long-form reports on the Stratfor Store.
Views: 92355 Stratfor
ViaRailTrip1
 
43:20
Maps © Department of Natural Resources Canada. All rights reserved. Three warnings before you enjoy!: 1. This video is intended for the serious rail nerd, as it's quite lengthy, and contains positional maps. 2. The footage is from my old Compact-VHS camcorder, that I have since dropped by accident and don't use anymore. I wish ViaRail did a better job at cleaning their dome car windows, as you can tell, it affects the viewing. 3. My iMovie program that I use to create these clips ended up corrupting the project file on my last attempt at putting in a map picture-in-picture, which above else was the wrong map to use. Alas, I can now only publish the project and nothing more, it will have to do...hope you like it.
Views: 27 QuesnelVideo
Canada Topo Maps Pro - APK Review
 
01:04
Review : http://apkreview.co/com-atlogis-camaps Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXVMaZLuJ31EPoc9ESw6inA?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APK-Review-543725709120671/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/APK_Review Google+: https://plus.google.com//110233720157716783778 Easy to use outdoor/offline navigation app with the best topographic maps of Canada.This app gives you similar mapping options as you might know from Garmin or Magellan GPS handhelds.Main features for outdoor-navigation:• Bulk-download of map tiles for OFFLINE USAGE (not for Google and Bing maps)• Create and edit Waypoints• GoTo-Waypoint-Navigation• Create and edit Routes• Route-Navigation (Point-to-Point Navigation)• Track Recording (with speed, elevation and accuracy profile)• Tripmaster with fields for odometer, average speed, bearing, elevation, etc. • GPX-Import / Export, KML-Export• Search (placenames, POIs, streets)• Customizable datafields in Map View and Tripmaster (e.g. Speed, Distance, Compass, ...)• Share Waypoints, Tracks or Routes (via eMail, Facebook, ..)• and many more ...Available map layers:• Topomaps Canada (CanMatrix, seamless coverage at scales 1:50.000 and 1:250.000)• Toporama Maps Canada (CanVec, NTDB, Atlas of Canada)• Google Maps (Satellite images, Road- and Terrain-Map)• Bing Maps (Satellite images, Road-Map)• Open Street Maps (OSM Mapnik and Cloudemade Cyclemap)• Hillshading overlay layer for OSM, Google, Bing or Toporama mapsToporama Maps Canada: These are the most recent topographic maps of Canada. Can be enhanced with hillshading overlay.Topomaps Canada: These maps contain many small pathes and 4WD tracks that are missing in Toporama, Google, Bing and OSM maps. This layer is essential for real outdoor and offroad trips in Canada. Seamless mosaic of more than 13.000 collar clipped 1:50.000 maps.Use this navigation app for outdoor activities like hiking, biking, camping, climbing, riding, skiing, canoeing or offroad 4WD tours.Preload FREE map data for areas without cell service.Canadian topographic maps are enhanced with Atlogis® hillshading and placenames.Credits for topographic map data: "© Department of Natural Resources Canada. All rights reserved."Please send comments and feature requests to [email protected]
Views: 543 APK Review
International Natural Resources Italy Canada America
 
08:06
This is a Project for School, in our Marketing Class. It shows the top 5 natural resources for Italy Canada and America.
Views: 259 laurendampier
Saudi Arabia's Geographic Challenge
 
02:04
Stratfor explains how Saudi Arabia's difficulty in maintaining its territory and the need to export its natural resources will continue to be a challenge. About Stratfor: Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. For individual and enterprise subscriptions to Stratfor Worldview, our online publication, visit us at: https://worldview.stratfor.com/ And make sure to connect with Stratfor on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/stratfor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stratfor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/stratfor YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stratfor Learn more about Stratfor here: https://www.Stratfor.com Get the latest company news here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons Or review and purchase our longform reports on geopolitics here: https://store.stratfor.com And listen to the Stratfor podcast for free here: iTunes - http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Podcast_iTunes Stitcher - http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/stratfor-talks Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/stratfortalks Libsyn - http://stratfor.libsyn.com/ Download the All New Mobile App for Stratfor. You can also access Stratfor Worldview Content in the App when you are offline. Free Download for iOS (from Apple App Store): http://bit.ly/Statfor_Mobile_App_for_Apple_Devices Free Download for Android (from Google Play Store): http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Mobile_App_for_Android_Devices To subscribe to Stratfor Worldview, click here: https://worldview.stratfor.com/subscribe Join Stratfor Worldview to cut through the noise and make sense of an increasingly complicated world. Membership to Stratfor Worldview includes: Unrestricted access to Stratfor Worldview's latest insights, podcasts, videos, and more. Members-only community forums. My Collections - your personal library of Stratfor insights saved for later reading. Discounts to our long-form reports on the Stratfor Store.
Views: 200892 Stratfor
CANADA FACTS IN HINDI || कनाडा की क्‍माल बाते || CANADA FACTS AND INFO || COOL. FACTS ABOUT CANADA
 
10:18
HELLO GUYS HOW R U ALL , IN THIS VIDEO IN THIS VIDEO. TALK ABOUT CANADA. Canada (French: [kanadɑ]) is a country located in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres (3.85 million square miles), making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Canada's southern border with the United States is the world's longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Consequently, its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, many near the southern border. Canada's climate varies widely across its vast area, ranging from arctic weather in the north, to hot summers in the southern regions, with four distinct seasons. Various indigenous peoples have inhabited what is now Canada for thousands of years prior to European colonization. Beginning in the16th century, British and French expeditions explored, and later settled, along the Atlantic coast. As a consequence of various armed conflicts France ceded nearly all of its colonies in North America in 1763. In 1867, with the union of three British North American colonies through Confederation, Canada was formed as a federal dominion of four provinces. This began an accretion of provinces and territories and a process of increasing autonomy from the United Kingdom. This widening autonomy was highlighted by the Statute of Westminster of 1931 and culminated in the Canada Act of 1982, which severed the vestiges of legal dependence on the British parliament, except for the power to amend its constitution. Canada is a federal parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy, with Queen Elizabeth II being the head of state. The country is a realm within the Commonwealth of Nations, a member of the Francophonie and officially bilingual at the federal level. It ranks among the highest in international measurements of government transparency, civil liberties, quality of life, economic freedom, and education. It is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many other countries. Canada's long and complex relationship with the United States has had a significant impact on its economy and culture. Canada is a developed country and has the fifteenth-highest nominal per capita income globally as well as the tenth-highest ranking in the Human Development Index. Its advanced economy is the tenth-largest in the world, relying chiefly upon its abundant natural resources and well-developed international trade networks. Canada is part of several major international and intergovernmental institutions or groupings including the United Nations, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the G7 (formerly G8), the Group of Ten, the G20, the North American Free Trade Agreement and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum. While a variety of theories have been postulated for the etymological origins of Canada, the name is now accepted as coming from the St. Lawrence Iroquoian word kanata, meaning "village" or "settlement".[12] In 1535, indigenous inhabitants of the present-day Quebec City region used the word to direct French explorer Jacques Cartier to the village of Stadacona.[13] Cartier later used the word Canada to refer not only to that particular village but to the entire area subject to Donnacona (the chief at Stadacona);[13] by 1545, European books and maps had begun referring to this small region along the Saint Lawrence River as Canada.[13] From the 16th to the early 18th century "Canada" referred to the part of New France that lay along the Saint Lawrence River.[14] In 1791, the area became two British colonies called Upper Canada and Lower Canada collectively named the Canadas; until their union as the British Province of Canada in 1841. CAPITAL : OTTAWA POPULATION : 37,067,011 OFFICIAL LANGUAGES : ENGLISH , FRENCH DONT FORGET HIT : L-I-K-E S-H-A-R-E S-U-B-S-C-R-I-B-E AFFILIATE LINKS : MY SET UP : MY PHONE : http://amzn.to/2n85SZR MY COMPUTER : http://amzn.to/2Gcqg4I FOR YOUTUBERS : BEST MIC FOR YOUTUBERS : http://amzn.to/2E3psyb BEST CAMERA FOR YOUTUBERS : http://amzn.to/2n7AF8K BEST LAPTOP FOR YOUTUBERS : http://amzn.to/2n3F78E SOCIAL LINKS : FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/GuriKhindaOfficial INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/guri_khindaofficial CONTACT FOR SPONSORSHIP : [email protected] BACKGROUND MUSIC : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAOAz8XqgiQ
Views: 4574 Rare Fact
Topographic Maps
 
01:00
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 363 STEM Activities
The Amazing Map: Meteghan! - The Amazing Treasure Map
 
01:18
This is a preview for the fourth video in The Amazing Map: Meteghan! series, available from MovieMakers.ca this video highlights the Natural Resources of Meteghan, Nova Scotia. For more info visit: http://www.moviemakers.ca/
Views: 3667 MovieMakers Canada
Topographic Maps
 
01:02
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 208 STEM Activities
The Canadian Shield
 
05:12
Social Studies 10 Project Canadian Landform Regions Links to Maps: http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=40563208fb094246850cd75a6e625ffa http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=b58c134ff9794ffca851c138897824fe http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=7f89cc093fa049b98e961cbaf936d07d http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=e55547aad4514dff840cf74e38f80714 http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=14a0a9e3d3ce470b978d873e549e3ceb
Views: 17166 Paul Wang
Renewable Energy Mapping For Canada - Earth Hour
 
01:02
Fund our project at http://ehour.me/gorenewable to create a detailed map of renewable resources across the country—wind, solar, hydro, geothermal and biomass—and set Canada on the path to 100% renewable energy. By supporting this project, you're not only making this map possible. You're laying the foundation for large-scale change, creating an example for other countries to follow and generating benefits for decades to come. You're also sending a clear message to our country's leaders that the time has come to chart a new, greener energy path for Canada. The more crowdfunding we get, the more convincing that message becomes.
Views: 1756 WWF-Canada
Topographic Maps
 
00:54
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 144 STEM Activities
The National Map: Historical Topo resources
 
04:05
Introduction to the Historical Topo collection from the USGS National Map.
Views: 199 Rachael Black
Topographic Maps
 
01:16
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 378 STEM Activities
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Atlas - Orientation 2/6/2013
 
01:08:37
This video is the full version of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Atlas orientation recorded on February 6, 2013. This includes the introduction that was not available from the GOTO Webinar. To access the Natural Resources Atlas, please visit the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Maps and Mapping page at: http://anr.state.vt.us/site/html/maps.htm
Views: 2337 VTANR GIS
Geo-Spatial Survey of Natural Resources
 
08:23
GEO SPATIAL TECHNOLOGY IS A POWERFUL TOOL TO TRANSFORM MANAGEMENT OF FORESTS,ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT WITH SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT"----"Geo Spatial Information Technology" thrives upon convergence and amalgamation of Geographical Topo-Sheets, Digital Satellite Imageries, Global Positioning System & Geographical Information Services. This GeoSpatial Intelligence not only facilitates accessing, analysing large chunk of digital spatial data, mixing of tremendous amount of attributes but also empowers interpretation of satellite imageries, monitoring of forest wealth in a routine, utilizing sustained yield on periodic basis, administering India's 40% natural capital which help and assist trigger integrated natural resource development in the sector of Forest, Ecology and Environment as seen never before. Monitoring Forest, Ecology and Wild Life Resources is essential in present day global scenario as economic development of any country depends on sustainable management of its renewable natural resources. This sector tangibly and intangibly contributes significantly in growth in term of GDP providing food, fibre, forest produce, medicines apart from supplying timber, fuel wood and multitude of genetic resources which could not be measured and quantified to such a greater precision as ever before. Sustainable management of ecology, environment, flora and fauna helps in conservation of bio diversity, maintenance of soil fertility and control of floods, droughts, landslide and climatic disasters-thus maintaining equilibrium in ecosystem and environment. National Forest Policy encompasses sustained yield and regulation of ever growing demand of forest resources ensuring conservation of natural forest wealth and its protection. Geo Spatial Technology assists us in analysis, assessment and management of natural resources through application of combination of remote sensing, GPS, GIS tools and techniques, in addition to skilful interpretation of exhaustive satellite earth imageries comprehensively. The GeoSpatial Cyber-Ecosystem work flow allows comprehensively a forester for inventory mapping, forest composition assessment and to raise early warning for degradation together with monitoring of surrounding water resources, wild fires and illegal encroachments as well as regulating felling activities to prevent uncontrolled deforestation. It will not only help in formation of "Standard Protocols" but will also assist in growth and development of natural resources ensuring greater rate of returns, higher productivty in a transparent and responsivesystem of g-Governance ..A K Singh
Views: 1269 A K Singh
The Amazing Map: Bouctouche! - The Amazing Treasure Map
 
01:08
This is a preview for the forth video in The Amazing Map: Bouctouche! series, available from MovieMakers.ca this video highlights the Natural Resources of Bouctouche New Brunswick. For more info visit: http://www.moviemakers.ca/
Views: 480 MovieMakers Canada
The Canadian NTS System for OSM
 
03:54
Explaining a bit about NTS and the quadrant numbering system and how to find your tile. The map to find your tile: http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/maps/topo/map/ The ftp site to download tiles: ftp://ftp2.cits.rncan.gc.ca/osm/pub/ To look up the location of a tile number: http://www.steggink.org/geo/
Views: 488 Adam Dunn
Why Natural Resources Canada has partnered with UNBC
 
01:02
Dr. Phil Burton discusses why Natural Resources Canada has partnered with UNBC for better research
Topographic Maps
 
01:02
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 167 STEM Activities
Topographic Maps Grid Distance and Elevation  pt1 2 (1966) US Army Training Film
 
14:14
This training video shows Topographic maps and grids. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topographic_map In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11]
Views: 58 Old Movies Reborn
Erosional Features
 
00:37
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 142 STEM Activities
Erosional Features
 
01:04
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 173 STEM Activities
Erosional Features
 
01:41
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 131 STEM Activities
Nova Scotia, Canada - Natural Resources, University R&D, Incentives
 
02:00
http://www.novascotiabusiness.com Businesses can do more from Nova Scotia. Accessibility to natural resources, such as wind, tidal and solar, enables the province to engage in significant research and development activities as well as large scale projects.
3rd Class Natural Resources
 
01:28
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Views: 723 math tricks tips
Plate Tectonics
 
00:56
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 196 STEM Activities
Plate Tectonics
 
01:20
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 152 STEM Activities
(CNQ) Canadian Natural Resources
 
06:26
(CNQ) Canadian Natural Resources
Views: 30 Bill Gunderson
Erosional Features
 
01:03
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 131 STEM Activities
Topographic Maps
 
00:57
Topographic Maps - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 352 STEM Activities
Plate Tectonics
 
00:51
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 159 STEM Activities
Plate Tectonics
 
01:23
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 120 STEM Activities
Science Video for Kids: Natural Resources of the Earth
 
05:17
Natural resources are found all over Earth like sunlight, air, water, rocks, soil, plants and animals. There are two types of natural resources - renewable and nonrenewable resources. Let's learn more about natural resources by playing this video. #ChildEducation #ScienceVideos #Kids #Science #Education Looking for more educational content? After watching the video, put your kids' knowledge to the test with our Natural Resources quiz: http://ow.ly/10hqkD
Views: 445119 Turtlediary
Erosional Features
 
00:51
Topographic Maps - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 131 STEM Activities
Plate Tectonics
 
01:09
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 128 STEM Activities
U.S. - Canada Arctic Expedition Surveying the Extended Continental Shelf
 
08:33
Visit: http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/268 for more information. American and Canadian scientists head north on a collaborative expedition to map the Arctic seafloor and gather data to help define the outer limits of the continental shelf. Each coastal nation may exercise sovereign rights over the natural resources of their continental shelf.
Views: 2794 USGS
Plate Tectonics
 
01:02
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 126 STEM Activities
Plate Tectonics
 
01:08
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 139 STEM Activities
It's time to draw borders on the Arctic Ocean
 
12:50
Why Russia wants to own the North Pole. Follow Johnny to stay up to date: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnnyharrisvox Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( https://youtu.be/4WvKeYuwifc) 2. The Arctic & Russia (https://youtu.be/Wx_2SVm9Jgo) 3. Japan & North Korea (https://youtu.be/qBfyIQbxXPs) 4. Mexico & Guatemala (https://youtu.be/1xbt0ACMbiA) 5. Nepal & The Himalaya (https://youtu.be/ECch2g1_6PQ) 6. Spain & Morocco (https://youtu.be/LY_Yiu2U2Ts) The ice in the Arctic is disappearing. Melting Arctic ice means new economic opportunities: trade routes in the Arctic ocean, and access to natural resources. Because of this, the Arctic nations are now moving to expand their border claims. Russia has shown that it’s the most ambitious, using a potent combination of soft power and military buildup to advance its agenda. They’ve said the Arctic is rightfully theirs. Check out more arctic maps from IBRU, Durham University, UK: http://www.durham.ac.uk/ibru/resources/arctic / Vox Borders is a new international documentary series presented by Emmy-nominated videojournalist Johnny Harris. For this series, Johnny is producing six 10-15 minute documentaries about different borders stories from around the world.
Views: 1704253 Vox

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