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Generalizing a 1:250 000 National Topographic Map at Natural Resources Canada
 
21:32
Watch how National Resources Canada uses FME to integrate their geographic and cartographic data and then generalize it to meet their needs.
Views: 360 FME Channel
Industrial Regions of North America (USA, Canada)
 
03:22
Major industrial belts of USA and Canada produces manufacturing, mechanical, electrical, aircraft, food, beverages and heavy industry products. These places are rich in natural resources that supports their huge economy. Places in USA are - Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New York , Baltimore. New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburg, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago , Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Mississippi, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, Washington, Or¬egon, California, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Places in Canada are:- Quebec, Ontario, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Manitoba, Winnipeg, and Edmonton, Alberta, Vancouver and British Columbia. --- Please give me your feedback & other suggestions https://drive.google.com/open?id=18COyCaggEQFEr1JuaA6tJ4X-mpppwY8rFuEKlCWbWkU Get the map here:- http://aksgb.blogspot.in/2016/09/industrial-regions-of-north-america.html Click here if you want to subscribe to the channel:- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRealSengupta You can also view playlists of other NCERT Geography videos:- Class 6 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAZP9UNB2Vo&list=PL1vNLZF5gfwcc9Kw-n1D8wwBtT5wIKXwH Class 7 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Whz0leipCoI&list=PL1vNLZF5gfwcGsXgJnz9dTp5XE5L3d1d2 Class 8 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIrwdEexG2M&list=PL1vNLZF5gfwc7iHqozmofc_leWu00HLo5 Class 9 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuDbizd_W6k&list=PL1vNLZF5gfweFN0ps77y2jdFp7hTxl2sK Class 10 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTT_dXVbJ40&list=PL1vNLZF5gfweoo1UZYY3hF2e0UxXuf7lD Class 11 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NntksyX70uk&list=PL1vNLZF5gfwdhB7PRkMZ0sWfhV07AT6Z_ Class 12 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9wWJCHJM6M&list=PL1vNLZF5gfweoiGYv6d5uc6CjVY1VDAWJ
Views: 18321 Amit Sengupta
The World Without Canada (Natural Resources) Season 1, Episode 2
 
44:11
Natural Resources Canada's glorious natural resources stabilize, feed and fuel the World. Remove Canada from globe and the repercussions are catastrophic.
Views: 9354 Canada Strong
Israel's Geographic Challenge
 
02:21
Stratfor explains Israel's primary geographic challenge rooted in its dearth of natural resources and lack of strategic depth. About Stratfor: Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. For individual and enterprise subscriptions to Stratfor Worldview, our online publication, visit us at: https://worldview.stratfor.com/ And make sure to connect with Stratfor on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/stratfor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stratfor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/stra... YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stratfor Learn more about Stratfor here: https://www.Stratfor.com Get the latest company news here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons Or review and purchase our longform reports on geopolitics here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons And listen to the Stratfor podcast for free here: iTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/s... Stitcher - http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/strat... Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/stratfortalks Libsyn - http://stratfor.libsyn.com/ To subscribe to Stratfor Worldview, click here: https://worldview.stratfor.com/subscribe Join Stratfor Worldview to cut through the noise and make sense of an increasingly complicated world. Membership to Stratfor Worldview includes: Unrestricted access to Stratfor Worldview's latest insights, podcasts, videos, and more. Members-only community forums. My Collections - your personal library of Stratfor insights saved for later reading. Discounts to our long-form reports on the Stratfor Store.
Views: 402787 Stratfor
Mozambique's Geographic Challenge
 
02:21
Stratfor explains how the failure to align Mozambique's borders with ethnic boundaries, coupled with recent discoveries of natural resources, will test the country's unity. About Stratfor: Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. For individual and enterprise subscriptions to Stratfor Worldview, our online publication, visit us at: https://worldview.stratfor.com/ And make sure to connect with Stratfor on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/stratfor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stratfor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/stratfor YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stratfor Learn more about Stratfor here: https://www.Stratfor.com Get the latest company news here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons Or review and purchase our longform reports on geopolitics here: https://store.stratfor.com And listen to the Stratfor podcast for free here: iTunes - http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Podcast_iTunes Stitcher - http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/stratfor-talks Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/stratfortalks Libsyn - http://stratfor.libsyn.com/ Download the All New Mobile App for Stratfor. You can also access Stratfor Worldview Content in the App when you are offline. Free Download for iOS (from Apple App Store): http://bit.ly/Statfor_Mobile_App_for_Apple_Devices Free Download for Android (from Google Play Store): http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Mobile_App_for_Android_Devices To subscribe to Stratfor Worldview, click here: https://worldview.stratfor.com/subscribe Join Stratfor Worldview to cut through the noise and make sense of an increasingly complicated world. Membership to Stratfor Worldview includes: Unrestricted access to Stratfor Worldview's latest insights, podcasts, videos, and more. Members-only community forums. My Collections - your personal library of Stratfor insights saved for later reading. Discounts to our long-form reports on the Stratfor Store.
Views: 71187 Stratfor
What’s so great about the Great Lakes? - Cheri Dobbs and Jennifer Gabrys
 
04:47
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-s-so-great-about-the-great-lakes-cheri-dobbs-and-jennifer-gabrys The North American Great Lakes — Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie, and Superior — are so big that they border 8 states and contain 23 quadrillion liters of water. They span forest, grassland, and wetland habitats, supporting a region that’s home to 3,500 species. But how did such a vast and unique geological feature come to be? Cheri Dobbs and Jennifer Gabrys takes us all the way back to the Ice Age to find out. Lesson by Cheri Dobbs and Jennifer Gabrys, animation by TED-Ed.
Views: 602368 TED-Ed
Science Video for Kids: Natural Resources of the Earth
 
05:17
Natural resources are found all over Earth like sunlight, air, water, rocks, soil, plants and animals. There are two types of natural resources - renewable and nonrenewable resources. Let's learn more about natural resources by playing this video. #ChildEducation #ScienceVideos #Kids #Science #Education Looking for more educational content? After watching the video, put your kids' knowledge to the test with our Natural Resources quiz: http://ow.ly/10hqkD
Views: 403440 Turtlediary
What Are The Natural Resources Of Canada?
 
00:38
Canada's natural resource wealth at a glance resources canada wikipedia en. Dec 2013 the resources fall into three categories energy, mineral and timber. Canatural resources the canadian encyclopedia. Mineral resources include gold silver, nickel copper, copper zinc, lead iron, molybdenum, uranium, potash and diamonds 27 apr 2017 natural canada seeks to enhance the responsible development use of canada's competitiveness products 7 feb 2018 geography other earth sciences. It is a treasury of material things to be turned into useful commodities by our skill and energy. Energy resources include natural gas, crude oil, bitumen (oil sands) and coal. Googleusercontent search. This engagement is now closed as the opportunity to participate was from july 7 th until october 31 st. Thank you for your participation. Canada's natural resource wealth at a glancenatural resources canada. The contributions of the energy, mining and forest sectors to canada's economy continue be significant. The department of mines, created in 1907, was reorganized as the mines and resources 1936 learn about working at natural canada. For more information, please have a look at our final report on online engagement clean technologyCanada's natural resource wealth glancenatural resources canada. Please contact us to request a format other than those available auditor general of canada bargaining bilingualism bill c 377 4 525 border security child care citizenship and immigration contracting out cutbacks disability insurance issues discrimination duty accommodate electoral reform employment equity the ministry protects ontario's biodiversity while promoting economic opportunities in resource sector supporting outdoor recreation. The department of natural resources (french ministre des ressources naturelles), operating under the fip applied title canada (nrcan), is ministry government responsible for resources, energy, minerals and metals, forests, earth sciences, mapping remote sensing 6 canadian metals plan. Minister nathalie des rosiers natural resources canada (nrcan) for the reporting period endingcanada remains well positioned to face global economic challenges, due in part strength of its resource sectors. Join linkedin today for free. See who you know at natural resources canada, leverage your professional network, and get hired 22 feb 2018 canada (nrcan), our approach is to provide quick answers the individuals dealing with pay issues, clear continuous messages employees, contribute meaningfully government wide solutions support nrcan 's senior management by following 16 jan 2017 nserc students fellows postdoctoral visiting fellowships in canadian laboratories program archived content. Envirostats canada's natural resource wealth at a glance. Geography, earth sciences help us understand canada's land, natural resources and environmentagriculture agri food canada canadian inspection agency northern economic development nuclear safety 21 sep 2015 saskatchewan. The company
Saudi Arabia's Geographic Challenge
 
02:04
Stratfor explains how Saudi Arabia's difficulty in maintaining its territory and the need to export its natural resources will continue to be a challenge. About Stratfor: Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. For individual and enterprise subscriptions to Stratfor Worldview, our online publication, visit us at: https://worldview.stratfor.com/ And make sure to connect with Stratfor on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/stratfor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stratfor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/stratfor YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stratfor Learn more about Stratfor here: https://www.Stratfor.com Get the latest company news here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons Or review and purchase our longform reports on geopolitics here: https://store.stratfor.com And listen to the Stratfor podcast for free here: iTunes - http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Podcast_iTunes Stitcher - http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/stratfor-talks Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/stratfortalks Libsyn - http://stratfor.libsyn.com/ Download the All New Mobile App for Stratfor. You can also access Stratfor Worldview Content in the App when you are offline. Free Download for iOS (from Apple App Store): http://bit.ly/Statfor_Mobile_App_for_Apple_Devices Free Download for Android (from Google Play Store): http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Mobile_App_for_Android_Devices To subscribe to Stratfor Worldview, click here: https://worldview.stratfor.com/subscribe Join Stratfor Worldview to cut through the noise and make sense of an increasingly complicated world. Membership to Stratfor Worldview includes: Unrestricted access to Stratfor Worldview's latest insights, podcasts, videos, and more. Members-only community forums. My Collections - your personal library of Stratfor insights saved for later reading. Discounts to our long-form reports on the Stratfor Store.
Views: 195633 Stratfor
Argentina's Geographic Challenge
 
02:00
Stratfor explains how Argentina's geographic position and natural resources have made it relatively safe from outside powers but have created internal political challenges. About Stratfor: Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. For individual and enterprise subscriptions to Stratfor Worldview, our online publication, visit us at: https://worldview.stratfor.com/ And make sure to connect with Stratfor on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/stratfor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stratfor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/stratfor YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stratfor Learn more about Stratfor here: https://www.Stratfor.com Get the latest company news here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons Or review and purchase our longform reports on geopolitics here: https://store.stratfor.com And listen to the Stratfor podcast for free here: iTunes - http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Podcast_iTunes Stitcher - http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/stratfor-talks Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/stratfortalks Libsyn - http://stratfor.libsyn.com/ Download the All New Mobile App for Stratfor. You can also access Stratfor Worldview Content in the App when you are offline. Free Download for iOS (from Apple App Store): http://bit.ly/Statfor_Mobile_App_for_Apple_Devices Free Download for Android (from Google Play Store): http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Mobile_App_for_Android_Devices To subscribe to Stratfor Worldview, click here: https://worldview.stratfor.com/subscribe Join Stratfor Worldview to cut through the noise and make sense of an increasingly complicated world. Membership to Stratfor Worldview includes: Unrestricted access to Stratfor Worldview's latest insights, podcasts, videos, and more. Members-only community forums. My Collections - your personal library of Stratfor insights saved for later reading. Discounts to our long-form reports on the Stratfor Store.
Views: 89775 Stratfor
North America Through Maps - Physical Geography Preparation - UPSC CSE IAS 2018 2019
 
23:01
You can find the entire course here: https://goo.gl/y9A7Tq You can find all my courses here: https://goo.gl/q56Z6z North America Through Maps - Physical Geography Preparation - UPSC CSE IAS 2018 2019 In this course, Arundeep Karnati discusses the physical geography of North America through the help of maps for UPSC CSE. He will be describing the mountain ranges, lakes and rivers of North America with the help of maps. Download the Unacademy Learning App from the Google Play Store here:- https://goo.gl/02OhYI Download the Unacademy Educator app from the Google Play Store here: https://goo.gl/H4LGHE Do Subscribe and be a part of the community for more such lessons here: https://goo.gl/gycFVs
Views: 29648 Unacademy
The Canadian Shield
 
05:12
Social Studies 10 Project Canadian Landform Regions Links to Maps: http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=40563208fb094246850cd75a6e625ffa http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=b58c134ff9794ffca851c138897824fe http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=7f89cc093fa049b98e961cbaf936d07d http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=e55547aad4514dff840cf74e38f80714 http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=14a0a9e3d3ce470b978d873e549e3ceb
Views: 16047 Paul Wang
It's time to draw borders on the Arctic Ocean
 
12:50
Why Russia wants to own the North Pole. Follow Johnny to stay up to date: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnnyharrisvox Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( https://youtu.be/4WvKeYuwifc) 2. The Arctic & Russia (https://youtu.be/Wx_2SVm9Jgo) 3. Japan & North Korea (https://youtu.be/qBfyIQbxXPs) 4. Mexico & Guatemala (https://youtu.be/1xbt0ACMbiA) 5. Nepal & The Himalaya (https://youtu.be/ECch2g1_6PQ) 6. Spain & Morocco (https://youtu.be/LY_Yiu2U2Ts) The ice in the Arctic is disappearing. Melting Arctic ice means new economic opportunities: trade routes in the Arctic ocean, and access to natural resources. Because of this, the Arctic nations are now moving to expand their border claims. Russia has shown that it’s the most ambitious, using a potent combination of soft power and military buildup to advance its agenda. They’ve said the Arctic is rightfully theirs. Check out more arctic maps from IBRU, Durham University, UK: http://www.durham.ac.uk/ibru/resources/arctic / Vox Borders is a new international documentary series presented by Emmy-nominated videojournalist Johnny Harris. For this series, Johnny is producing six 10-15 minute documentaries about different borders stories from around the world.
Views: 1539814 Vox
Resources: Welcome to the Neighborhood - Crash Course Kids #2.1
 
03:15
Welcome to the Neighborhood! Humans need a lot of things to survive (I'm sure you've noticed). We need food, water, and shelter and it takes a lot of resources to get all of those things. What are resources? In this episode of Crash Course Kids, Sabrina talks about what resources are and how we use them. And you might be surprised where all of it starts. This first series is based on 5th grade science. We're super excited and hope you enjoy Crash Course Kids! ///Standards Used in This Video/// 5-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Crash Course Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/crashcourse Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/CrashCourseKids Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Credits... Executive Producers: John & Hank Green Producer: Nicholas Jenkins Cinematographer & Director: Michael Aranda Editor: Nicholas Jenkins Script Supervisor: Mickie Halpern Writer: Ben Kessler Consultant: Shelby Alinsky Script Editor: Blake de Pastino Thought Cafe Team: Stephanie Bailis Cody Brown Suzanna Brusikiewicz Jonathan Corbiere Nick Counter Kelsey Heinrichs Jack Kenedy Corey MacDonald Tyler Sammy Nikkie Stinchcombe James Tuer Adam Winnik
Views: 194818 Crash Course Kids
NRCan Knowledge Management Vision Video
 
04:01
North Star - NRCan Knowledge Management Vision
Views: 13561 jellybeancontest
Topographic Maps
 
01:02
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 201 STEM Activities
Topographic Maps
 
01:16
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 361 STEM Activities
Topographic Maps
 
01:00
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 344 STEM Activities
Topographic Maps
 
01:02
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 157 STEM Activities
Canada Topo Maps Pro - APK Review
 
01:04
Review : http://apkreview.co/com-atlogis-camaps Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXVMaZLuJ31EPoc9ESw6inA?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APK-Review-543725709120671/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/APK_Review Google+: https://plus.google.com//110233720157716783778 Easy to use outdoor/offline navigation app with the best topographic maps of Canada.This app gives you similar mapping options as you might know from Garmin or Magellan GPS handhelds.Main features for outdoor-navigation:• Bulk-download of map tiles for OFFLINE USAGE (not for Google and Bing maps)• Create and edit Waypoints• GoTo-Waypoint-Navigation• Create and edit Routes• Route-Navigation (Point-to-Point Navigation)• Track Recording (with speed, elevation and accuracy profile)• Tripmaster with fields for odometer, average speed, bearing, elevation, etc. • GPX-Import / Export, KML-Export• Search (placenames, POIs, streets)• Customizable datafields in Map View and Tripmaster (e.g. Speed, Distance, Compass, ...)• Share Waypoints, Tracks or Routes (via eMail, Facebook, ..)• and many more ...Available map layers:• Topomaps Canada (CanMatrix, seamless coverage at scales 1:50.000 and 1:250.000)• Toporama Maps Canada (CanVec, NTDB, Atlas of Canada)• Google Maps (Satellite images, Road- and Terrain-Map)• Bing Maps (Satellite images, Road-Map)• Open Street Maps (OSM Mapnik and Cloudemade Cyclemap)• Hillshading overlay layer for OSM, Google, Bing or Toporama mapsToporama Maps Canada: These are the most recent topographic maps of Canada. Can be enhanced with hillshading overlay.Topomaps Canada: These maps contain many small pathes and 4WD tracks that are missing in Toporama, Google, Bing and OSM maps. This layer is essential for real outdoor and offroad trips in Canada. Seamless mosaic of more than 13.000 collar clipped 1:50.000 maps.Use this navigation app for outdoor activities like hiking, biking, camping, climbing, riding, skiing, canoeing or offroad 4WD tours.Preload FREE map data for areas without cell service.Canadian topographic maps are enhanced with Atlogis® hillshading and placenames.Credits for topographic map data: "© Department of Natural Resources Canada. All rights reserved."Please send comments and feature requests to [email protected]
Views: 500 APK Review
Topographic Maps
 
00:54
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 143 STEM Activities
Topographic Maps
 
00:57
Topographic Maps - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 326 STEM Activities
3rd Class Natural Resources
 
01:28
land natural resources natural resource economics natural resources company www dnr 3 types of natural resources natural resources wikipedia two natural resources missouri natural resources what are some natural resources what is the natural resources natural resources meaning natural resources in usa michigan natural resources natural resources images protecting natural resources natural resources notes ohio's natural resources natural resources include conservation of natural resources introduction natural resources in the united states global warming environment secretary of environment and natural resources what is land resources natural resources games natural resources oil natural resources and their uses dnr intranet what does natural resources mean different types of natural resources house natural resources natural resources fund vermont natural resources kinds of natural resources house natural resources committee pictures of natural resources natural re natural resource policy speech on natural resources for class 11 what is the meaning of natural resources natural resources sf american natural resources mnr fishing department of conservation and natural resources natural resources video resources of nature natural resources usa what are land resources exhaustible natural resources natural resources their uses america natural resources natural resources committee natural resources in the us names of natural resources natural resources types concept of natural resources natural research ministry natural resources what do you mean by natural resources natural resources com what is the definition of natural resources classification natural resources america's natural resources natural resources and its types house committee on natural resources natural resource manager ministry of natural resources maps department natural resources what is meant by natural resources natural resources forum resource websites national resources definition natural resources importance native resources nature r natural resources industry natural resources classification scarce natural resources dnr office natural resources law ministry of natural resources contact what is national resources division of natural resources natural resources research what are earth's resources primary natural resources the definition of natural resources definition for natural resources natural resources police department of resources natural resources define natural characteristics department of natural resources and environment us department of natural resources natura usa natural resource scarcity earth resources definition is air a natural resource natural resources agency what are national resources what's a natural resource dnr logo committee on natural resources is metal a natural resource department of national resources house resources committee what is the dnr natural resources sector what are natural dnr phone number natural resource extraction 5 pictures of natural resources resource department natural resources stocks the dnr mnr phone number natural resources climate change global warming dnr resources natural climate change facts global warming facts renewable energy sources global warming effects environmental conservation global warming causes environmental protection nature reserve environment protection act nrcs natural resources definition conservation of natural resources land resources national resources natural source conserving natural resources examples of natural resources natural resource management about global warming global warming information natural resources examples global climate change global warming solutions global warming articles current environmental issues renewable energy resources global warming issues stop global warming how to conserve natural resources global warming problems global warming climate change global warming statistics global warming debate define global warming natural resources for kids renewable natural resources what is natural resources types of natural resources what are the natural resources natural hr natural resources canada depletion of natural resources list of natural resources what are natural resources definition of natural resources ministry of natural resources define natural resources dnr website what is a natural resource d &r dept of natural resources mdnr department of conservation nature source state of nature classification of natural resources economic resources canada natural resources natural resources essay
Views: 489 math tricks tips
Plate Tectonics
 
01:20
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 152 STEM Activities
International Natural Resources Italy Canada America
 
08:06
This is a Project for School, in our Marketing Class. It shows the top 5 natural resources for Italy Canada and America.
Views: 257 laurendampier
Plate Tectonics
 
00:56
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 192 STEM Activities
Plate Tectonics
 
01:09
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 128 STEM Activities
Plate Tectonics
 
01:02
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 126 STEM Activities
NRCan Animation of Fort McMurray Fire
 
00:30
Downloaded from: https://twitter.com/csa_asc/status/736186076788862976 Animation was produced by NRCan and published by Canadian Airspace Agency
Views: 11 Ruslan Rydvanskiy
Plate Tectonics
 
01:15
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 142 STEM Activities
Topographic Maps Grid Distance and Elevation  pt1 2 (1966) US Army Training Film
 
14:14
This training video shows Topographic maps and grids. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topographic_map In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11]
Views: 49 Old Movies Reborn
Plate Tectonics
 
00:51
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 155 STEM Activities
Plate Tectonics
 
01:08
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 139 STEM Activities
Understanding the First Nations Principles of OCAP™: Our Road Map to Information Governance
 
06:22
First Nation peoples have always understood the need to protect our natural resources, and increasingly one of our most important resources today is information. Information is about more than numbers and surveys: it's also about identity, heritage, and the right to self-determination. That's why the First Nations Information Governance Center (FNIGC) was created nearly 20 years ago. FNIGC's mission is to uphold the First Nations principles of OCAP™ a set of guidelines that ensure First Nations people are the stewards of their own information -- and that they have the power to own, protect and control how their information is used. This six-minute video explains FNIGC's mission, provides an overview of its work and explores the importance of OCAP™ for First Nations people and communities. To view a two-minute version of this video visit "Understanding the First Nations Principles of OCAP™: Our Road Map to Information Governance (Short)": http://youtu.be/SNpZw3DI4S4 To learn more about OCAP™ visit: http://fnigc.ca/ocap.html For more information about FNIGC (and our two First Nations survey initiatives the RHS and the REEES) visit: http://fnigc.ca/ To ask us a question or request a publication call us toll-free at 1-866-997-6248 or email us at [email protected] Video produced by Basetwo Media: http://videoforbusiness.ca/ Narration provided by Carmen Jones (Chiefs of Ontario): http://www.amazon.com/Can-You-See-Carmen-Jones/dp/B00J0JLF1K https://itunes.apple.com/gw/album/can-you-see-it/id839961062 Portions of "Honouring Our Women" (Feat. Robert Gladue) used with permission by Jason Chamakese: http://music.cbc.ca/#/artists/Jason-Chamakese https://soundcloud.com/jason-chamakese
Views: 4965 FNIGC
Nova Scotia, Canada - Natural Resources, University R&D, Incentives
 
02:00
http://www.novascotiabusiness.com Businesses can do more from Nova Scotia. Accessibility to natural resources, such as wind, tidal and solar, enables the province to engage in significant research and development activities as well as large scale projects.
Plate Tectonics
 
01:23
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 120 STEM Activities
Erosional Features
 
00:37
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 139 STEM Activities
ViaRailTrip1
 
43:20
Maps © Department of Natural Resources Canada. All rights reserved. Three warnings before you enjoy!: 1. This video is intended for the serious rail nerd, as it's quite lengthy, and contains positional maps. 2. The footage is from my old Compact-VHS camcorder, that I have since dropped by accident and don't use anymore. I wish ViaRail did a better job at cleaning their dome car windows, as you can tell, it affects the viewing. 3. My iMovie program that I use to create these clips ended up corrupting the project file on my last attempt at putting in a map picture-in-picture, which above else was the wrong map to use. Alas, I can now only publish the project and nothing more, it will have to do...hope you like it.
Views: 27 QuesnelVideo
Erosional Features
 
01:41
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 131 STEM Activities
Erosional Features
 
01:04
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 169 STEM Activities
Erosional Features
 
01:03
Topographic map - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 129 STEM Activities
Erosional Features
 
00:51
Topographic Maps - Plate Tectonics A topographic map with contour lines Part of the same map in a perspective shaded relief view illustrating how the contour lines follow the terrain Section of topographical map of Nablus area (West Bank) with contour lines at 100-meter intervals. Heights are colour-coded In modern mapping, a topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a line connecting places of equal elevation. Natural Resources Canada provides this description of topographic maps:[1] These maps depict in detail ground relief (landforms and terrain), drainage (lakes and rivers), forest cover, administrative areas, populated areas, transportation routes and facilities (including roads and railways), and other man-made features. Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions,[2][3] "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations,[4] and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics.[5] However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief (contours) is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly (and erroneously, in the technical sense) called "topographic".[3] The study or discipline of topography is a much broader field of study, which takes into account all natural and man-made features of terrain. History[edit] See also: Topography § Etymology, Cadastre § History, and Cartography § History Topographic maps are based on topographical surveys. Performed at large scales, these surveys are called topographical in the old sense of topography, showing a variety of elevations and landforms.[6] This is in contrast to older cadastral surveys, which primarily show property and governmental boundaries. The first multi-sheet topographic map series of an entire country, the Carte géométrique de la France, was completed in 1789.[7] The Great Trigonometric Survey of India, started by the East India Company in 1802, then taken over by the British Raj after 1857 was notable as a successful effort on a larger scale and for accurately determining heights of Himalayan peaks from viewpoints over one hundred miles distant.[8] Global indexing system first developed for International Map of the World Topographic surveys were prepared by the military to assist in planning for battle and for defensive emplacements (thus the name and history of the United Kingdom's Ordnance Survey). As such, elevation information was of vital importance.[9] As they evolved, topographic map series became a national resource in modern nations in planning infrastructure and resource exploitation. In the United States, the national map-making function which had been shared by both the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of the Interior migrated to the newly created United States Geological Survey in 1879, where it has remained since.[10][11] 1913 saw the beginning of the International Map of the World initiative, which set out to map all of Earth's significant land areas at a scale of 1:1 million, on about one thousand sheets, each covering four degrees latitude by six or more degrees longitude. Excluding borders, each sheet was 44 cm high and (depending on latitude) up to 66 cm wide. Although the project eventually foundered, it left an indexing system that remains in use. By the 1980s, centralized printing of standardized topographic maps began to be superseded by databases of coordinates that could be used on computers by moderately skilled end users to view or print maps with arbitrary contents, coverage and scale. For example, the Federal government of the United States' TIGER initiative compiled interlinked databases of federal, state and local political borders and census enumeration areas, and of roadways, railroads, and water features with support for locating street addresses within street segments. TIGER was developed in the 1980s and used in the 1990 and subsequent decennial censuses. Digital elevation models (DEM) were also compiled, initially from topographic maps and stereographic interpretation of aerial photographs and then from satellite photography and radar data. Since all these were government projects funded with taxes and not classified for national security reasons, the datasets were in the public domain and freely usable without fees or licensing.
Views: 131 STEM Activities
Seabed Mapping Initiatives at NRCan - Dr. Vladimir Kostylev 1 of 2
 
12:58
A one day learning session for federal and provincial scientists and managers on Remote Sensing Technologies and Applications for Mapping and Monitoring the Coast was held on 5 November 2015 in Amherst, Nova Scotia. For more information and PDF presentation files go to: http://coinatlantic.ca/index.php/remote-sensing . For the entire meeting playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjQuGRK0PvbJHkVg1YzeD7hqgHZ6ZIAuw .
Views: 16 COINAtlantic
What Is The Lowest Elevation In Canada?
 
00:47
Source cia world factbook this page was last updated on july 9, 2017 the highest point in province is mount fairweather at an elevation of 15,325 feet above sea level. The story of this 21 aug 2011 answer 1 6 i'm 67 and my husband is 79. Fogo 2,829 m (a volcano on fogo island). 5 24 mar 2015 this fascinating infographic on earth's highest and lowest points and the information below comes from chiltern thrust bore in the uk. Canada wikipedia coastline lowest canadian surface point at sea level; Great slave lake bottom, northwest territories 6140 n 11400 w 61. This is a list of the highest points canadian provinces and territories, by heightmount columbiamount caubvick mont d'ibervilleishpatina ridge. Kimberley is a city [kimberley incorporated as on march 29, 1944] that little higher and larger elevation 3,663 ft 1,110 the highest point trans canada highway 1643 meters (5390 feet) near parks bridge by golden, bc 29 apr 2005 elevations distances in united states. What is the lowest elevation in canada? ? Canada extremes geography indexmundi. 000 (great slave lake) lowest fresh water point of north america at 458 m ( 1,503 feet). Cape verde lowest point atlantic ocean 0 m highest mt. List of highest points canadian provinces and territories wikipedia. Highest and lowest points on earth earthsky. Why is everyone answering the atlantic ocean? Did pacific suddenly grow legs and sprout above rockies? I'm saying ocean lowest elevation in canada extremes mean 487 m point 0 highest mount logan 5,959. 4 6 hasil google books. Mount fairweather was named by james cook in 1778 because of the good weather 17 nov 2015 canada lowest point atlantic ocean 0 m highest mount logan 5,959. This is a form of this search was done by paul harker natural resources canada and brian back ottertooth. I've planned (with the help of trip advisor) a very ambitious 9 day including both glacier and banff, yoho List highest points canadian provinces territories wikipedia. Canadian mapping big book gr. The highest points of the provinces and territories canada lowest in countries islands oceans world. Central african republic lowest point 23 jan 2012 rossland community, where their claim is 'nestled in the crater of an ancient volcano at elevation 1023 meters, one canada's highest cities. On the page resting place of rms titanic lies 12,500 ft (3,800 metres) beneath ocean, located off coast newfoundland, canada. Definition this entry includes both the highest point and lowest. We've done a lot of hiking in the past but not recently, and obviously we are older. West quoddy head, me 27 jan 2006 you would start at the highest elevation and end lowest. Introduction 50 largest cities highest and lowest summits over 14,000 feet east of rocky mountains north end, (n s boundary) me new brunswick, canada, 4704', 6747', northeast, 1,719, 1,713, 1,613. This is 22 nov 2011 on the day we visited, plateau was populat
Views: 42 Hadassah Hartman
Official Artist Channel
 
15:29
http://www.youtube.com/Sifu Respect/privacy Map Data: Map data © AND. Property parcel data for USA. © CoreLogic Inc., 2011. Map data © Getchee, 2011. © INCREMENT P CORP., 2011, http://www.incrementp.co.jp/gc01info/e/legal01.html. Business Listing data © Localeze, 2011. Mapping data for Australia and New Zealand. © MapData Sciences Pty Ltd.Inc., 2011, PSMA www.nowwhere.com.au/lic/NowWhereLic.htm Postal data © DMTI, 2011. This software contains Postal Code OM Data copied by Apple under a sub-license from DMTI Spatial Inc., a party directly licensed by Canada Post Corporation. The Canada Post Corporation file from which this data was copied is dated [insert date]. © TomTom. All rights reserved. This material is proprietary and the subject of copyright protection, database right protection and other intellectual property rights owned by TomTom or its suppliers. The use of this material is subject to the terms of a license agreement. Any unauthorized copying or disclosure of this material will lead to criminal and civil liabilities. // MultiNet® North America, © 2006 – 2011 TomTom. All rights reserved. This material is proprietary and the subject of copyright protection and other intellectual property rights owned or licensed to TomTom. TomTom is an authorized user of selected Statistics Canada computer files and distributor of derived information products under Agreement number 6776. The product is sourced in part from Statistics Canada computer files, including 2009 Road Network File (RNF), 92-500-XWE/XWF and 2006 Census Population and Dwelling Count Highlight Tables, 97-550-XWE2006002. The product includes information copied with permission from Canadian authorities, including © Canada Post Corporation, GeoBase®, and Department of Natural Resources Canada, All rights reserved. The use of this material is subject to the terms of a License Agreement. You will be held liable for any unauthorized copying or disclosure of this material. // MultiNet® South East Asia, Base data © Bakosurtanal. // MultiNet® Europe, Data Source © 2011 TomTom based on: MultiNet® data of Austria © BEV, GZ 1368/2003; MultiNet® data of Denmark © DAV, violation of these copyrights shall cause legal proceedings; MultiNet® data of Northern Ireland Ordnance Survey of Northern Ireland; MultiNet® data of Norway © Norwegian Mapping Authority, Public Roads Administration / © Mapsolutions; MultiNet® data of Russia © Roskartographia; MultiNet® data of Switzerland © Swisstopo; MultiNet® data of The Netherlands Topografische onderground Copyright © dienst voor het kadaster en de openbare registers, Apeldoorn 2006; MultiNet® data of France © IGN France. Neighborhood data © Urban Mapping, 2011. Map data © 2011 Waze.
Views: 84 ROKU PAGE 🍑
Science at Work: Flood Monitoring
 
02:23
Natural Resources Canada is the federal centre of expertise for "remote sensing" – the science of using technologies such as satellite imagery and aerial photographs to detect information on objects on earth. Our scientists use remote sensing information for a variety of reasons that you might expect, like map making, environmental monitoring, and assisting with the development of natural resources. But remote sensing can also be a valuable tool in emergency situations, such as a major flood.
Views: 891 NaturalResourcesCa
The National Map: Historical Topo resources
 
04:05
Introduction to the Historical Topo collection from the USGS National Map.
Views: 194 Rachael Black
Where Terranes Collide: The Geology of Western Canada
 
25:30
The video is about the geology and the geologists of the Canadian Cordillera. The current concepts concerning the origin of the mountains of western Canada and the geologists and geoscientists who work among them are featured. Source: Geological Survey of Canada, Educational Video Series NR92017VE, 1993; 25:30 min Publisher: Natural Resources Canada / Ressources naturelles Canada. Further information can be found at the following URL: http://geoscan.ess.nrcan.gc.ca/starweb/geoscan/servlet.starweb?path=geoscan/geoscanfastlink_e.web&search1=R=205041
Views: 62815 Geology