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Articles (a, an, the) - Lesson 1 - 7 Rules For Using Articles Correctly - English Grammar
 
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In this lesson, learn the 7 rules for using articles in English correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I will teach you the seven rules that you need to know for using articles in English correctly. Articles are the words ‘a’, ‘an’, and ‘the’. There is a final quiz at the end of the lesson for you to test your understanding. OK, the first rule is about where to use ‘a’ and where to use ‘an’. So rule number one is use ‘a’ before a consonant sound, and ‘an’ before a vowel sound. So in all of these words – you see that they start with a consonant sound. Cat starts with /k/, dog starts with /d/, boy with /b/, girl with /g/, house with /h/ and tree with /t/. So we say ‘a cat’, ‘a dog’, ‘a boy’, ‘a girl’, ‘a house’, ‘a tree’ etc. Notice that in natural speech, we don’t say ‘a’, we say ‘uh’ – like ‘a cat’. In this next set of words, you see that, they all start with a vowel sound – apple starts with /ae/, engineer starts with /e/, ice-cream with /ai/, old with /o/, umbrella with /uh/. So we say ‘an apple’, ‘an engineer’, ‘an ice-cream cone’, ‘an old womman’, ‘an umbrella’ and so on. In speech, we don’t say ‘an’, we say /ən/. Let’s do a small exercise. You see ten items on the screen. For each one, I want you to say if you would use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before it. Stop the video, think about it, then play the video again and check. OK here are the answers. Did you get them all right? I want to focus on items number seven to ten because these are a little tricky. Number seven is ‘a university’ because even though ‘university’ starts with the letter ‘u’ the first sound of the word is not a vowel sound. We don’t say /ooniversity/. We say /yoo-nə- vər-si-ty/ so that first sound is a /y/ sound, which a consonant sound, so we say ‘a university.’ Number eight is similar. The word ‘European’ starts with a /y/ sound, so ‘a European tour.’ In number nine, the spelling has an ‘h’ at the start but that ‘h’ is silent. We don’t say /hau-ər/, we say /au-ər/. The first sound is an /au/ sound which is a vowel sound, so this is ‘an hour’. In the same way, in number ten, we say MA. ‘M’ starts with an /e/ sound which is again a vowel sound, so ‘an MA in English’. OK let’s move on to rule number two: Use ‘a’ and ‘an’ ONLY with singular, countable nouns. We say that a noun is countable if we can count it – one, two, three, four etc. All of these words on the screen are countable. We can say one elephant, three cars, ten teachers, five hundred onions and so on. Now if you talk about one person or thing, like one elephant or one car, then that’s called a singular noun and if you say ten teachers or five hundred onions, those are called plural nouns. Uncountable nouns cannot be counted in this way. Nouns like water, sugar, milk, love, anger, knowledge are some examples. If you think about it, you cannot say “I drank four waters” or “I want eight milks”. To a person, you can say “I love you” but you can’t say “I have five loves for you” – that doesn’t make any sense. So these are all uncountable. Alright, so the rule is - you can only use ‘a’ and ‘an’ if you’re talking about one person or one thing. Let’s do another quick exercise. Here are ten items again. This time, you see ‘a’ or ‘an’ before the nouns, but some of these are wrong. They should NOT have ‘a’ or ‘an’ before them. Stop the video, identify the mistakes, then play the video again and check. OK, here are the answers. Number three is wrong because ‘shirts’ is a plural and you cannot use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before a plural noun. Number five is wrong because ‘happiness’ is uncountable, so again, ‘a’ or ‘an’ cannot be used there. The same goes for number six – water is uncountable. Number nine is wrong because ‘doctors’ is a plural – you can say ‘a doctor’ but not ‘a doctors’. And finally, in number ten, advice is an uncountable noun – so you cannot ask for ‘an advice’. Now a quick note here: the article ‘the’ can be used with all kinds of nouns – singular or plural countable nouns, and uncountable nouns. OK, so let’s now talk about how to choose between ‘a’ or ‘an’ and ‘the’. Here’s rule number three: Use ‘a’ or ‘an’ to talk about a person or thing unknown to your listener. And use ‘the’ to talk about a person or thing known to your listener. For example, “My sister has two computers: a PC and a laptop. The PC is quite old but the laptop is brand new.” I say ‘a PC’ and ‘a laptop’ because that’s the first time I’m mentioning the two computers. That is, until this point, they are unknown to you, the listener.
Views: 638458 Learn English Lab
Article in Hindi - a, an, the  -  examples exercises rules  | Learn English in Hindi
 
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Article in Hindi - A, An, The Examples and use in sentences | Learn English in Hindi .What are Articles ? Learn English in Hindi. Articles - Meaning in Hindi, what is meaning of articles - Articles in English Grammar, Indefinite Articles - A/An - Indicate to general things or persons. The things or persons which are not sure / not particular / not certain or not specific. Definite Article - The - Indicate to particular things or persons. The things or persons which are certain / specific or particular. SUBSCRIBE to our Channel https://www.youtube.com/englishacademy1 Learn to speak English. The focus of this channel is to help you learn English so that you speak English fluently. We also publish Videos on English School Lessons for CBSE and ICSE Schoos English Grammar Lessons https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9vL8QnJ37pIpLUJKUf50xcHVYLtONI8s How to score better Marks in Exams https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAVT89QctP4 Also See our website https://www.successcds.net Follow us: http://www.facebook.com/SuccessCD http://google.com/+successcds https://twitter.com/entranceexam https://twitter.com/successcds http://www.youtube.com/successcds1 http://www.youtube.com/englishacademy1
Views: 208636 English Academy
A, AN, THE - Articles in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ 'I saw A movie last night' or 'I saw THE movie last night'? A, AN, and THE are called articles and they can be very confusing. Learn exactly when and how to use articles in English in this important grammar lesson! http://www.engvid.com/a-an-the-articles-in-english/
सीखो Prepositions in English Grammar With Examples In Hindi | Learn Use Of Prepositions | Awal
 
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हिन्दी द्वारा सीखो English Grammar में Prepositions का सही इस्तेमाल. Learn Use of Prepositions in English through Hindi lesson by Awal. Learn Prepositions in English Grammar with examples in Hindi with Awal, in a simple and interesting way. This video is helpful to all people who want to learn use of Prepositions in English grammar for general use as well as appearing in competitive exams such as SSC CGL, Bank Exam, CAT Exam, SBI PO, etc. In this English tutorial video, Awal provides step by step explanation of types of prepositions and how to fit them in English sentence structure with examples in Hindi. Awal has also shown the different between a preposition and a conjunction with an example in Hindi. If you are looking for low level details on how to use various prepositions, this video can be helpful to you as a beginner. If you want to understand the basics of prepositions in English grammar, prepositional phrases, object of preposition, etc to speak English fluently and confidently, then this video with help you to know how to make sentences using different prepositions of time, place, position, direction, agent, purpose, manner, etc. This English tutorial is helpful for Indians, Pakistanis, and others around the world who can understand Hindi or Urdu. Watch other videos of Awal through this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jbEcSuEoR4&list=PLR2GOVaoHO5_GDOua3C_QmA1oN93QTGvN Follow Awal on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnEnglishWithAwal https://www.youtube.com/TSMadaan is a Hindi Life Changing Videos Channel to raise your Success and Happiness level on various subjects like motivation inspiration and self help plus personality development. This channel also shows health videos and English Videos by various trainers.
Views: 1638164 TsMadaan
a/an, the, no article - Articles in Sentences
 
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Articles in English can be hard to understand, and even harder to put into use. In this video I give a few sentences and explain which articles are used in which situations. You can watch this video several times if necessary in order to fully absorb the information. The first examples are given quickly and there are additional written examples, so it may be a good idea to pause the video several times in order to make sure you are following along. Hopefully after this video you will have a much better understand of articles. Thank you for watching.
Views: 526 Philip's English
Grammar: Using THE with common and abstract nouns
 
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An abstract noun is a word that means a general concept or idea, like "life" or "friendship". We can use "the" with common nouns, as in "the sky is blue". But can we use "the" with abstract nouns? For example, would you say "happiness is important" or "the happiness is important"? If you are not sure, watch this lesson to learn when to use "the" with general and abstract nouns. Don't forget to take the quiz afterwards to test your understanding! http://www.engvid.com/grammar-the-common-abstract-nouns/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. Many English learners have trouble deciding when to use "the" or no "the", so I understand that problem, I know it can be a little bit confusing, but I believe that by the end of this lesson, you're going to find it much easier. Okay? So let's start with a little quiz first to see where you stand regarding that word "the". So, let's look at this first example. Should you say: "Life is beautiful." or "The life is beautiful."? Okay. Think about it. Decide. Another one: "Friendship is precious." or "The friendship is precious."? Which one is right? Think for yourself. We'll do one more, and then I'll give you the answers. "Happiness is important." or "The happiness is important."? Which one is correct? Do you know? How do you know? How do you decide which one is right? I'll tell you. When we're talking about something which is a general concept or idea, then we do not use "the". Okay? For example, let's take the first one. "Life is beautiful." Now, life is a general concept, so we do not need "the". So, this is the correct answer. All right? Not this. "Life is beautiful." Because life is a general idea, a general concept. Okay? We're not talking about anything specific. If we say: "The life of wise people is beautiful." that is something specific, and then we would be correct to say: "The life". Okay? But if we're just talking in general, then no "the". Let's look at the next example. "Friendship is precious." Again, friendship is a general idea or a general concept, so this is correct. Okay? In this example, this one was wrong. But if I said, for example: "The friendship between those two children is precious." then that would be fine, because now I'm specifying which friendship. Right? The friendship between those two children, so then it becomes specific, and then we would use "the". But in this example, this is correct. Okay? Just like this was, and this is wrong, because this is a general idea. Okay? Next one: "Happiness is important." By now you know, again, happiness is a general idea, a general concept, so this is correct. In this example, it would be wrong to say: "The happiness", because: The happiness of what? So, if we say: "The happiness of my family is important." that's fine. That's very good. That would be a perfect sentence. But in this case, we cannot say: "The happiness is important." because we didn't specify which happiness. Okay? So, in this case, that's wrong, and this is correct. Okay? Now, the same principle applies to these. See if you can figure it out. Okay? "I want to make money." or "I want to make the money."? Which one do you think is right? Are we speaking in general, or are we speaking specifically? Well, we are speaking in general right now, so this is correct, because we're just talking about money; we didn't say which money. I want to make money. Right? General idea. If I said, for example: "I want to make the money I need to pay my rent." that's specific, so then I could say: "the money", because I'm explaining after that which money. Okay? But in this example, no. Next one: "She wants to lose weight." or "She wants to lose the weight."? Is it general or is it specific? What do you think? It's still general. Good. By now you're getting really smart. "She wants to lose weight." is a general term. Right? We're just talking about weight in general; not any specific weight. But if I say: "She wants to lose the weight she put on during the holidays." that's specific, and then I need "the". Okay? But not in this example. So, last one here: "He needs to earn respect." or do we say: "He needs to earn the respect."? Is it general or is it specific? By now you know, you'll really know. It's general. Very good. Okay? Because we didn't talk about any specific respect; we're talking about respect in general. So: "He needs to earn respect." But if this was being used, it would be something like: "He needs to earn the respect of his peers." Peers are people your age. Okay? Or: "He needs to earn the respect of his employees." for example, or "of his parents". Then it becomes specific. Which respect? The respect of his parents, the respect of his employees. All right? So, if it was specific, then we could say "the", but when we're just talking in general, we don't need "the". "Life is beautiful.", "Friendship is precious.", "Happiness is important.", "I want to make money.", "She wants to lose weight.", "He needs to earn respect."
Learn English Grammar Articles (a, an, the)
 
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Learn to use the articles A, An and The is English sentences and paragraphs. Articles from rob (CC BY 3.0) vimeo.com/12885697
Views: 38 Learn Math
Indefinite Articles (a, an)(writing sentences)
 
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English_e-2-writea-ansentences-1.mp4
Views: 74 Sabaq. Pk
How to write an Article (Cambridge First, Advanced; Blogs)
 
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Article writing is a very different style of writing and requires a different approach from the essay. In this lesson, we look at how to write for the Cambridge tests, as well as how to write for the web, including blogs and newsletters. Find out how to use a more playful language to capture a reader’s attention.
Views: 96948 Write to Top
HOW TO USE ARTICLES  IN SENTENCE
 
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EASY TO LEARN ENGLISH
HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN - How to Use These Forms Correctly (with Examples) - English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use have been / has been / had been correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. Most Common MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://goo.gl/n8BJ7v 2. HAVE HAD / HAS HAS / HAD HAD: https://goo.gl/Aj3hRD 3. SHOULD HAVE / COULD HAVE / WOULD HAVE: https://goo.gl/X2bw7J 4. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://goo.gl/oC2qKX 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://goo.gl/A3VuGh 6. All MODAL VERBS lessons: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 Transcript: ‘Have been’, ‘has been’ and ‘had been’. These forms cause a lot of confusion for many people. Well, in this video, I will clear up that confusion. I’m going to teach you the three main uses of these forms how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. Alright, let’s get started. Before we talk about the uses, you need to know the basics of where to use have, has and had been: in the present, if the subject of a sentence is I/You/We/They or a plural noun, then we use ‘have been’. If the subject is He/She/It or a singular noun, then we use ‘has been’. This is when we talk about the present. When we talk only about the past, it’s very easy. For any subject, we use ‘had been’. OK, let me test you: what do we use with He/She/It or a singular noun in the present? We use ‘has been’. What about with I/You/We/They or plural nouns? We use ‘have been’. And in the past tense? We use ‘had been’ for all subjects. Good, so let’s now look at the first use of these forms. This is in the present perfect tense. That is, to talk about actions or situations that started in the past and are still continuing. Here’s an example: “I have been working as a teacher for 7 years.” In speech, we usually shorten ‘I have’ to ‘I’ve’ – “I’ve been working as a teacher for 7 years.” Let’s look at a timeline for this. You know that I started working as a teacher seven years ago (or in 2010 because at the time of filming this video, right now, it’s 2017), and I’m still a teacher, so this action – ‘working’ is continuing. In this sentence, we can also say: “I have been working as a teacher since 2010.” The difference between ‘for’ and ‘since’ is that if you want to mention the duration (or amount of time), then you use ‘for’ (like ‘for 7 years’). If you want to mention the starting point of the action or situation, use ‘since’ (as in ‘since 2010’). Here’s another example: let’s say that this lady wants to see the doctor. Her appointment was at 3 o’clock. She came to the hospital at 3, but the doctor wasn’t there. So she started waiting at 3 o’clock and she’s still waiting – let’s say it’s 5 o’clock now, so two hours have passed. So what can we say? We can say: “She has been waiting for two hours.” or “She has been waiting since 3 o’clock.” In natural speech, we say he‘s been and she’s been: “She’s been waiting”. OK have a look at this sentence: “He has been the CEO of the company for four months” or we can say ‘since June’ because that’s when he started. Here, we don’t have an –ing verb like ‘working’ or ‘waiting’. That’s because we don’t want to focus on any action, we just want to express the situation – that he became the CEO in June and he’s still the CEO. Here’s another example: “They’ve been married for 25 years / since 1992.” When did they get married? In 1992. Are they still married now? Yes. So, they’ve been married for 25 years now. OK, so what about ‘had been’? Well, let’s change our sentences a little bit: “I had been working as a teacher for 7 years when I quit my job.” Ah, we see a different meaning here. It means that I started working as a teacher at some point in the past, I was a teacher for 7 years, but then I quit. So now, I am no longer a teacher. I want you to notice that there are two past actions here: one continuous action (“I had been working as a teacher”) and a single finished action at the end of that (“I quit”). Compare this to the previous sentence – “I have been working as a teacher” – here, there is only one continuous action and it’s still continuing, it’s not finished. So, please remember this rule: only use ‘had been’ if there were two events in the past: a continuing action or a situation and a single, finished action. So let’s go back to the other sentences. With these, we can say: “She had been waiting for two hours when the doctor finally arrived.” “He’d been the CEO of the company for only four months when it went bankrupt.” ‘Went bankrupt’ means the company lost all its money and closed down. “They had been married for 25 years when they divorced.” So are they still married? Unfortunately, no. Just like the sentences with ‘have been’ and ‘has been’ are in the present perfect tense, the sentences with ‘had been’ are in the past perfect tense.
Views: 1439582 Learn English Lab
Subject Verb Agreement  |  English Lesson  |  Common Grammar Mistakes
 
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⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish SUBJECT-VERB AGREEMENT is one of the most common mistakes that English learners make! It's so easy to forget that the verb form in English sentences changes, depending on the subject! - I AM hungry... - She IS thirsty... - They ARE fighting... - We HAVE been travelling - It HAS been so long. - She DOESN'T know... - You DON'T know... - They LIKE to travel. - She LIKES to travel. This English lesson will help you to review subject-verb agreement rules and fix your English grammar mistakes! I will also explain how these rules work in more complicated sentences. For example: sentences where the subject is a noun phrase, or where the subject and the verb are separated by a relative clause. Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/10/16/subject-verb-agreement/ *I recommend* ⭐️Speak with native teachers... 30mins every day! Get a free 14-day trial here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO! Do your friends a favour and help to translate this lesson into your native language! Contribute subtitles translations here: https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id... mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRi... Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 270164 mmmEnglish
Learn German | German Grammar | Rules for articles | Hints on how to guess the german articles | A1
 
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#LearnGermanOriginal #LearnGerman #GermanGrammar Learn German lessons online for beginners course - We help you learn german in a quick and easy way. Learn German Grammar - You will learn how to tell the articles i.e. rules for the articles (der, die, das) in the German language. Awesome hints on how to guess the articles. It is highly recommended to listen and learn the articles and their rules as it is. You can always pause and replay to hear something again. If you have any questions or comments, feel free to write! Watch our Playlists- A1 - https://goo.gl/YuxM9T A2 - https://goo.gl/Q9JKft Grammar - https://goo.gl/J8C1SJ Vocabulary - https://goo.gl/YF3wwt Speaking - https://goo.gl/wcUWo5 Do like our facebook page for more tips and interesting facts about Germany and other German speaking countries : FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/learn.german.language Also visit us here: TWITTER: https://twitter.com/learnGermanLang INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/learn.german.language/ GOOGLE+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/104938630697375657922/104938630697375657922 Learn German online for free with easy to understand lessons on our channel "Learn German". YOUTUBE: https://goo.gl/EWKjxj Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel on YouTube and start learning German today!
Views: 85242 Learn German
English Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about sentence structure in English. You’ll learn how to construct all kinds of sentences in English, from the simplest possible sentences, to long, complex sentences which contain many different ideas. Practice using correct sentence structure and post your example sentences in the comments! See the full version of this lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/sentence-structure. In this lesson, you'll learn: - How to build simple sentences. - Using compliments. - Adding onto simple sentences to create more detailed sentence structure. - How to add description to your sentence. - How to make complex sentences with independent clauses. - How to make complex sentences with dependent clauses. To see more free English lessons like this one, visit our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 262233 Oxford Online English
Is Am Are Was Were Be का सही Use - 1 | Learn English Grammar in Hindi with Speaking Practice | Awal
 
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हिन्दी द्वारा सीखो Is, Am, Are, Was, Were, Be का सही इस्तेमाल. Learn Use of Is, Am, Are, Was, Were, Be in English through Hindi video by Awal. This video shows how the verb BE (Is, Am, Are, Was, Were, Will Be) is used in Simple Present, Past & Future tense. Awal has explained these grammar concepts in an interesting way, using simple language and easy examples through Hindi. This video is helpful to the people who want to learn English grammar in Hindi. This part provides step by step explanation of how we make English sentences to describe something, using the combination of subject with an adjective or a noun. This video covers "to be" as a Main Verb and its various uses. In English grammar, Is/Am/Are/Was/Were/Be are used in multiple ways, so this series by Awal helps you clear this confusion. Awal has also given a lot of daily use sentences with subtitles, for your English speaking practice with translation through Hindi. In this video, Awal has also described the sentence structure to be used in such sentences, and what is the difference between its use in simple present tense, simple past tense, and simple future tense through this Part-1 video of Is, Am, Are, Was, Were and Be. If you are looking for low level detail on how to use Is, Am, Are, Was, Were, Will Be, Would Be, this video is for you as a beginner. For advanced students, this video is helpful because it includes the topic of compound sentences as well. If you want to understand the basics of English grammar to speak English fluently and confidently, this video with help you to understand the logic behind these grammar rules during English conversation. This English tutorial is helpful for Indians, Pakistanis, and others who can understand Hindi or Urdu. It is a helpful video for the students appearing for competitive exams such as Bank PO, SSC CGL, CAT, IELTS, TOEFL, etc. Watch other videos of Awal through this link: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLR2GOVaoHO5_o33NOUcvgtFI5IUDInB4K Follow Awal on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnEnglishWithAwal https://www.youtube.com/TSMadaan is a Hindi Life Changing Videos Channel founded by Ts Madaan to raise your Success and Happiness level on various subjects like motivation inspiration and self help plus personality development. This channel also shows health videos and English Videos by various trainers.
Views: 6060203 TsMadaan
Using May and Might - Basic English Grammar Lesson
 
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Using May and Might - Basic English Grammar Lesson In this video podcast Rachna brings out the basic difference between the common expressions May and Might, Students often get confused while using these expressions, Rachna explains the correct usage of May and Might with the help of example sentence for better understanding. Enjoy!
SMART Table Activity - Making Sentences - Articles
 
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Use determiners (articles, demonstratives).
Views: 2019 SMARTClassrooms
PUNCTUATION MASTERCLASS - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes - Comma, Semicolon, Period, Etc.
 
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Learn PUNCTUATION Easily in 30 Minutes in this Punctuation Masterclass. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix In this lesson, you will learn the rules for using: - period/full stop (.) - exclamation mark (!) - question mark (?) - comma (,) - semicolon (;) - colon (:) - apostrophe (') Partial transcript: Hello, and welcome back. In this lesson, I’m going to teach you the rules for using the seven most important punctuation marks, so that you can write correct English without making mistakes. There are exercises within the lesson to help you practice, and as always there is a final quiz at the end of the video. So, if you’re ready, let’s begin. We’re going to start with terminal punctuation. ‘Terminal’ means the end, so terminal punctuation marks are what we use to end a sentence. There are three of these: the period or the full stop, the exclamation mark, and the question mark. Let’s look at the period first. This mark is called the period in American English (AmE means American English), and it’s called the full stop in British English. It is used to mark the end of declarative and imperative sentences. I’ll explain. Here are some examples: “I teach English.” “We had pizza for dinner last night.” “If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella.” These sentences are called declarative sentences because they declare something; they give us some information. And at the end of each sentence, you see a period or full stop. Imperative sentences are commands or requests: “Please don’t feed the animals.” You might see this on a sign in a zoo. “Let me know what time your flight arrives.” “If it rains tomorrow, bring your umbrella.” Let’s now turn to the exclamation mark. It is used to convey strong emotion or feeling. Have a look at these two sentences: Both of them mean the same thing. The first sentence, which ends in a period, has no special feeling or emotion; it’s like saying “I’m really excited about my new job.” Doesn’t sound like I’m very excited, does it? That’s why we use the exclamation mark: “I’m really excited about my new job!” – it tells our reader to read the sentence with emotion – in this sentence, the emotion is excitement. This next sentence: “If you come to work late tomorrow, you’re fired!” Imagine a manger saying this to an employee. So, this expresses anger. In the same way, you can show many other feelings including surprise, joy, fear etc. using the exclamation mark. Now, both of these sentences are declarative, but you can also use the exclamation mark in an imperative sentence like this one: “Johnny, don’t play with your food!” You can imagine a mother saying that angrily to her son. So, it’s a strong or strict command. Another place where we use the exclamation mark is after interjections. Here are a couple of sentences: “Ouch! You just stepped on my foot!” “Wow! What a beautiful house!” Interjections are words like “ouch” and “wow” which are used to express feelings. So, remember: if you want to convey strong emotion in a sentence, put an exclamation mark at the end of it. If there’s no special feeling, just end the sentence with a period. OK, let’s turn now to the third terminal punctuation symbol: the question mark. It is used to mark the end of a question. So, it’s very straightforward: if a sentence is a question, then put a question mark at the end of it. Here are some examples: “What do you do?” “Are we allowed to feed the animals?” “If it rains tomorrow, should I bring my umbrella?” “Are you excited about your new job?” “Who lives in that house?” So, the rule is: if a sentence is a question, it must end with a question mark. Alright, let’s do a small exercise now. There are four sentences on the screen. I want you to add periods or full stops, exclamation marks and question marks where necessary. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video and check. OK, here are the answers. If you want, stop the video again, check your answers, then play the video and continue. Before we move on to the next topic, a quick note on spacing. Notice that there is no space between the last letter of a sentence and the terminal punctuation mark. If you put a space there, it’s wrong. But, when you begin a new sentence, you should leave a space after the terminal mark, and you should start the new sentence with a capital letter.
Views: 316322 Learn English Lab
Difference between - 'Clean out', 'Clean off', 'Clean up' & 'Clean away' -  English Grammar Lesson
 
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Learn to speak fluent English -- Accent Training, Correct Grammar usage, Idioms, Phrases and vocabulary with example sentences. Before Ceema explains the differences between "clean up", "clean out", etc. here's a warning: if you don't already know these phrases, it's a bad idea to learn them all at the same time. If you already know these expressions and you'd like to figure out exactly how they're different, Watch on! Spaces and messes When you talk about cleaning, you're talking about two different things: the space that you're cleaning the mess that's in that space You can use each form of "clean" to talk about either cleaning the space: eg. We need to clean up the living room. ORcleaning the mess that's there: eg. We need to clean up those dirty dishes. The different forms of 'clean' You "clean out" the inside of a space that has a large mess in it: clean out the refridgerator clean out your car clean out your desk You "clean off" a flat surface: clean off the counter clean off the whiteboard clean off your windshield You "clean up" a room or a larger area: clean up your bedroom clean up the city clean up after the concert clean up your hard drive "Clean away" is different from the others because you only use it to talk about the messy things that you're cleaning, not the space that those things are in: clean away the dishes clean away the mud clean away the broken branches 'Clean' by itself What about just using the word "clean" by itself? It usually means to clean the most obvious part of something. For example: clean the toilet This means to clean the inside of the toilet bowl. clean the floor This means to clean the surface of the floor. If using the word "clean" by itself would lead to any confusion, use one of the other phrases instead. For example, instead of saying "clean the cabinets", say: Can you clean out the cabinets? Or: Can you clean off the cabinets?
SIMPLE, COMPOUND, COMPLEX SENTENCES - with Examples, Exercises - Sentence Clause Structure - Grammar
 
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Learn the difference between SIMPLE, COMPOUND, and COMPLEX sentences, and how to us them correctly. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus 2. Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lI3R9_Z1HY 3. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI 4. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 6. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 156566 Learn English Lab
Learn English Grammar - Lesson One - Using THE PRESENT SIMPLE with easy examples
 
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English Grammar Lesson - Lesson One - The present perfect tense. This series of English lessons will take you through all the grammar rules of the language. A new video will be posted each week. How's Your Grammar? Misterduncan's PLAYLISTS - on youtube.com/duncaninchina Ask Misterduncan - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAD0A8CFF102D5CF2 Lessons 1 to 91- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF467B6C12B713A03 Full English - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DYX8jVA_kcIpQuRBXcf2XIZ English Topic - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DaUGBc2dP0bSbgCtpkiCnT7 WORD STOP - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8AC561C1AE953017 May days - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DaKQi3YG30D_NyX881Wsiln Dunctober - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DY7Olv13JrMwgdKsJ0Xwohq December drop in - https://www.youtube.com/playlistlist=PLbvnlSJNf_DY7bb_xeLDzKPEJLzN4Z3io Xmas lessons - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DYGEKPZ5Q1_CVxLbsH4tjVv LIVE STREAMS - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DbVirS_OcCiaeYxv8nUU6Ta My life in China and England - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL44BC10EEFAC0AF40 Other English lessons - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8B3F18AC104C9F46
How to write a basic paragraph
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ A writing lesson for absolute beginners! Here are four very basic rules you must follow when writing simple paragraphs. Learn the basics -- capitals, indentation, line spacing, and more. Then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-basic-paragraph/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. Do you know how to write a basic paragraph? This is not only for ESL students. This is for everyone around the world, even if you speak English, even if you don't speak English. This is a very, very beautiful, basic lesson on how to write small, short, beautiful paragraphs. "How to Write a Basic Paragraph". Now, I also want you to be very careful. This is not how to write a 200-word essay for your university exam. We don't have enough time in the world for me to teach you that, and I probably forget. So this is, very simply, how to write a basic English paragraph. One, two, three, four rules. Rule No. 1 is: Indent, indent. What does "indent" mean? Indent, basically, means -- I learned this when I was a child -- you take your finger. You can have a big finger, a small finger -- I don't care. You take your finger or two fingers, and you make a little space like so. This is called an "indentation" or "indent". So "indent" means you leave a space at the very first line of the paragraph. And that's it. You do not leave a space at any other lines in the paragraph, only the first line. So it's very important that you only indent the first line of your paragraph like so. Okay. The next thing that you have to do is you have to use a capital letter at the beginning of every sentence. Now, the word that I've written is "I". Another rule in English is that every single time you write "I", it must be a capital. So I'm going to write an example sentence for you to illustrate what I mean: "I am a teacher." Okay? This is one sentence. So rule No. 3: At the end of my sentence, I must use a period. A "period" is a dot, if you'd like. So "I am a teacher." So what I'm going to do is my next sentence... I'm going to begin it with a capital letter. "My" -- so I want to say, "My name -- My name is Ronnie." So what I've done: Rule No. 1, indent. Rule No. 2, you have to use a capital letter at the beginning of every new sentence. Rule No. 3, you're going to use a period at the end of each sentence so that the person reading your beautiful paragraph knows when to stop and take a break. For example, if I did not have a period here, I'd say, "I'm a teacher my name is Ronnie." You need to break up your ideas. So one sentence has one thought and one period. "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie." Next one. No. 4. I see this in a lot of students' writing. The two basic things about a paragraph are the form and the content. The form is the most important. The form is the indentation. And don't use point form. Do you know what "point form" is? If you're typing something on Word or on an email, "point form" is also called "bullets", which [makes shooting sounds]. So "bullet" means you would put each new sentence on a new line. So if I was to write this: "I'm a teacher", then I would put my next sentence here. This is not how to make a paragraph. This is "point form". So this is a bad paragraph. What I'm going to do is I'm going to write until I almost reach the end of the page. Don't write past the end of the page because then you're writing on the desk and it gets messy. So "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie. I live -- so I'm going to use up all of my line until the end -- I live in Canada." What would you like to know about Canada? "Canada is very cold." In the winter. So as you can see by my example, I only stop my sentence at the end of my paper. I don't use each sentence on each line. So four basic things to remember when you're writing a basic English paragraph. The first one is: Indent the first line of your paragraph only. Use a capital letter at the beginning of each new line or each new sentence. And use a period at the end. Also, don't forget: Don't use point form. "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie. I live in Canada. Canada is very cold. Go to 'Subscribe' on YouTube so you can find more great lessons like this." Goodbye.
सीखो In On At in English Grammar | Learn Meaning & Use of Prepositions In Hindi Part 3 | Awal
 
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हिन्दी द्वारा सीखो English Grammar में In, On, At का सही इस्तेमाल. Learn how to use prepositions In On At in English through Hindi lesson Part 3 by Awal. Learn prepositions of time and place in English Grammar with examples in Hindi with Awal, in a simple and interesting way. This video (Part 3) is helpful to all people who want to learn use of Prepositions in English grammar for general use as well as appearing in competitive exams such as SSC CGL, Bank Exam, CAT Exam, SBI PO, etc. In this English tutorial video, Awal provides step by step explanation about using the prepositions in on at, and how to fit them in English sentence structure with examples in Hindi. Awal has also shown the difference between in, on and at in English language. If you are looking for low level details on how to use prepositions of time such as in, on, at, this video (Part 3) can be helpful to you as a beginner. If you want to understand the basics of prepositions in English grammar, prepositional phrases, object of preposition, etc to speak English fluently and confidently, then watch the part 1 of Awal's videos on prepositions. Know how to make different sentences using easy tricks shown by Awal to make sentences about days, dates, week, month, year, etc. This English tutorial is helpful for Indians, Pakistanis, and others around the world who can understand Hindi or Urdu. Also, this video has a Quiz Exercise with sample Questions & Answers for practice. Give us feedback with your comments, shares, and likes. Watch Next Parts: Part 3A: https://youtu.be/FdBDtbNcd-8 Part 3B: https://youtu.be/gXjUv0de9B8 Follow Awal on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnEnglishWithAwal https://www.youtube.com/TSMadaan is a Hindi Life Changing Videos Channel to raise your Success and Happiness level on various subjects like motivation inspiration and self help plus personality development. This channel also shows health videos and English Videos by various trainers.
Views: 1701568 TsMadaan
Instantly improve your English with 3 easy words!
 
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Improve how you sound in English by mastering when these three words are used! I've met thousands of English learners at all levels. Most of them, even the advanced students, make mistakes with the words "a", "the", and "to". These are some of the most common words we use, so in this lesson I'm going to teach you how we use these words. I don't want to look just at grammar; I want you to understand these words and why we use them. If you're an advanced English student, this will be a great review for you. If you're a beginner, try to understand this and save yourself years of English mistakes. TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/instantly-improve-your-english-with-3-easy-words/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. The things I do for love. There's not a thing... Hi. James from engVid. Today's lesson is about instantly improving. Now, I know... "Instant", what does that mean? People say it all the time. I want to show you a little trick that will make your English sound better instantly, and I will give you a technique that you can use after to help practice this. What I have found are students have a mistake or make a mistake when they drop these three words, and because of that I know you're not a native speaker. But today I'm going to address that, show you the three words... Okay? Explain why, and then I will give you a technique that you can use at home soon as you go back over this video or any video to practice it, and you will get instantly better. 10-20%. Okay? Want to know what I'm talking about? Let's go to the board and look at something you've learned, but today you're going to understand. You ready? So, Mr. E said: "Which three words can help you sound like a native speaker?" I'm going to help you a little bit by doing this, and then we're going to go to the board. The words I'm talking about, and you might not consider them words but they are words are: "a" or "an"... Okay, and I consider that one word because it's modified. Right? "The" and "to". Of course you're going to say: "Yeah, James, we know all these. We learned this at beginner, so how does that instantly help me improve my English?" The problem is this: When a person knows something they will talk, when they understand they will change their behaviour or they will use the information. Many students know about articles and the preposition "to", but they actually don't use them in sentences. Many times I've heard students go... Say: "I need to go work tonight." Soon as you say that I know you're not a native speaker. Or if they say: "I bought car yesterday" or "I bought food..." Not "some food". "I bought apple yesterday at the store." I'm like: "A-... You mean an apple, right?" They don't think to say it, because they know: "Teacher, you know what I'm saying." And I go: "Yeah, I know what you're saying, but the way you said it I know English is not your first language." So what I want to do is get you to come back to understanding, not just knowing why these words are important, the fact that, especially with the articles we're going to talk about, they are in most of the sentences. You can almost not get by a sentence without using them. So let's go to the board and take a look. First, what is an article? Well, you'll see an article is the letter "a" or "an". Quickly on that one, "an" is used when we have a vowel sound, sound... Not a... Not just a vowel. So when you say: "A apple", we know "a" and "a" make it difficult for us to actually get it out and for you to understand, so we add: "an" to put a consonant to make it easier for the listener. "I want an apple." Oh, okay, cool. How about "hour"? Teacher, that has an "h" in front of it. I'm like: "Enh?" But we say: "hour", we don't say: "h-our", because with "a" we have to say: "an hour", and that once again tells me one hour. You keep noticing I keep saying "one". I'll explain in a second. Now, this is what we call and indefinite article. I.e. it's not special. When I say to you: "I want a marker", a marker. All right? I'm talking about this. See this? They're all basically the same. I don't care what type of marker. "A" just means generally speaking marker. That's why it's indefinite; it's not special. When we look at the word "the", "the" is special. In this case, when I say to you: "I want the marker", which one do you think I'm talking about? Can you see the difference? Clearly. Even if you don't know, you would look and see four, and see this and go: "He's probably talking about this one." So with a definite article what's happening is someone is being very specific. Well, there are two things. They could say something is special or something is specific. Okay? And here we have definite article is "the". "Tell the man I like him." Okay? "Tell the man", in this case both of us have to know what you're talking about, because if there are 10 men you'll go: "Which man?"
Basic English Grammar - Have, Has, Had
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ By special request -- this lesson teaches you about the easily and often mixed-up English verb "have"!
When NOT to use 'to' in English - Grammar
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ "I'm going to home" or I'm going to home"? "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to school?" Why do we use 'to' with some words and not with others? In this English grammar class, I'll teach you many words that don't go with 'to'. This is a mistake that sounds bad to native speakers, so try to learn these words and stop making this mistake! Go here to take a quiz on this lesson: http://www.engvid.com/when-not-to-use-to/ TRANSCRIPT "Are you going to home?" "Are you going home?" "Where are you going?" "What are you doing?" You're watching a video. My name's Ronnie. I'm going to teach you one trick. Finally, you will understand why in English, we say "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to work." But when we talk about our beautiful, warm, and cozy home we don't say "to". Why, why, why, I don't know. It's just English, isn't it? I can give you some clues. I'll give you some words. You will get this right away. It will be easy for you to do. So if you look at this sentence, "Are you going home?" A very, very big mistake that everyone says will be, "Are you going to home?" And I go, "No, no 'to'. Don't say 'to'. Don't say 'to', no!" Okay, okay, okay, "Are you going home?" Yes, don't say "to", but why? You learned that when you are going someplace, you say "to". For example, "Are you going to bed?" We don't say "to the bed", by the way. We just say bed. "Are you going to bed?" "Are you going to work?" Or you can use the past tense, "Did you go to work?" "Did you go to school?" "Did you go to engvid.com today, and check out a new lesson?" But when you say "home", you do not use "to". So you know the rule, maybe that this is a noun. This is a noun, so when you use going to a place which is a noun, you have to say "to", and then you come along, and you find this beautiful home, and Ronnie freaks out, because you say "to" and then you don't understand why. I don't know but I will give you a list of words that are places. But all of these words on this board, you cannot use with "to". So "are you going abroad?" You cannot ask someone, "Are you going to abroad?" If you look in the dictionary; the dictionary, one of those books. If you look at an online dictionary it'll tell you that these are adverbs of location, whereas the other ones you've learned are nouns. But hold on, "home" is a noun. Home is just this big exception going, "No, I am a noun. I don't want to have "to". All of these ones are not proper nouns, they're adverbs of location. Let's go through underground, underneath the surface of the land. If you have ever been to London, there's a big system called the Tube. It's also called the "underground". Most places in the world call it the "underground". In Canada, we call it the subway -- "sub" means "under". So you can say, "I'm going underground. I'm going underground." If you know The Jam -- "Wow, what an amazing band, Ronnie," I know. You will know this song called "I'm Going Underground." Maybe by the magic of video, we'll put on that video for you. "I'm going underground." "I'm going downtown," or you can say "uptown". I would just sing songs for everything, "Uptown Girls" -- little bit of Billy Joel for you. Uptown, downtown -- you don't need the "to". There, here, anywhere, nowhere, somewhere -- you don't need "to". In, inside, out, outside, upstairs, downstairs don't use "to". They're not nouns. They're places. One other thing to be very careful about, please, when you say this you want to say "upstairs" and "downstairs." Too many times I hear people say, "I went down-stair." Only one, just one stair, I made it. "I went up-stair." And then what did you do? You just stood there? Wow, don't say "down-stair, up-stair". Please use all of the stairs. Go up, okay? That'll be fun, more exciting. You can fall down the stairs too, that's fun. But again, we don't say "to". "I'm going downstairs." "I'm coming upstairs." If you are confused, or if you have ever been confused about when to use "to", the only advice I can give you is please remember this list of words. Once you have remembered this list, you'll go, "Oh that was easy." [That was easy.]" Yes, it was. Thank you, goodbye.
Basic English Grammar - Noun, Verb, Adjective, Adverb
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ What is a noun? What is a verb? What is an adjective? AHHHHH!!! Learn how to recognize nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in this important basic grammar lesson. Then test yourself with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/basics-noun-verb-adjective-adverb/
How to Use the word "being" correctly in English | uses of ‘being’ |Free Spoken English Techniques
 
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How to Use the word "being" correctly in English | uses of ‘being’ |Free Spoken English Techniques This video is about “how to use the word being correctly in english and basic rules in English language”. Easy English everyday channel helps you to improve your spoken English skills. Mr.J.Bala Krishna, a popular English language trainer will teach you spoken English. Grammar can be learn with simple techniques by watching these free online Spoken English videos. Mr.J.Balakrishna explains you simple ways to learn Spoken English without much focusing on detailed grammar. This video will explain you “how to use the word being correctly in english and how to speak in English”. These spoken English techniques will help you to attend interviews, and manage with your office daily routine. These English conversation videos and online free-spoken English videos will help you to improve your basic communication skills. Easy English Everyday channel contains many videos like How to Improve Writing Skills, How to Improve English Grammar, English Training Videos, Basic sentence structure, Online English lessons, how to improve sentence making in English, Importance of English Reading, How to Speak Proper English, how to speak fluent English, Online Spoken English classes, Spoken English for Students, How to write English, How to make sentence in English, English speaking videos, Online English lessons, How to speak proper English, How to improve English reading skills and How to learn Spoken English easily etc. “These videos will make your language beautiful and polished”. Some videos will explain you Basic English skill like how to improve English, Basic English lessons, How to make a sentences formation in English, how to Improve English Grammar, how to speak English fluently and confidently, Spoken English Course for beginners, spoken English tips, how to speak proper English. Some videos will explain you advanced English language classes like “Advanced spoken English classes, English Training Videos, Spoken English Course for beginners, learn English online, Vocabulary words in English, English Tutorial for beginners, free online advanced English courses, English vocabulary for daily use, spoken English lessons, how to speak fluent English, basic English grammar, free spoken English videos, How to Improve English Grammar, How to Improve Sentence making in English, Basic English grammar videos, English Tutorials for beginners, Online English Grammar videos” and you can find many other useful spoken English language videos in this Easy English Everyday channel. If you like this video, please click the “Like” button on the YouTube video and “Subscribe” to our channel for more lessons. Some of our important video links tips to improve your english communication skills https://goo.gl/Fxckxh how to learn english words and phrases https://goo.gl/tGkqLu complete english grammar on youtube https://goo.gl/AKkzXg daily conversation in english for speaking https://goo.gl/iw7KD9 speak english in 30 days video tutorials https://goo.gl/mCNmzv free english learning courses online https://goo.gl/svPh3d english course online free advanced https://goo.gl/1Ya3h4 english lessons for professionals https://goo.gl/ghXEDc Visit our website: https://www.easyenglisheveryday.com/ SHARE and LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/EasyEnglishEverydayChannel/ FOLLOW US: https://twitter.com/Easy_English_TV SUBSCRIBE US: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT6mXEYc5THlLo4Dh90RdPQ
Views: 187378 Easy English Everyday
English Grammar: AUXILIARY VERBS – be, do, have
 
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Do we say, "I am eat" or "I am eating"? What about "He didn't go" or "He didn't went"? These questions and more will be answered when you watch this English grammar lesson on auxiliary verbs. I will teach you how to use the three auxiliary verbs in English – "be", "do", and "have". We will go over each one in detail and with examples. First, you will learn how to use "be" in the passive and progressive forms in the present, past, and future. Then, we will look at "do" in the present and past simple. Last, I will teach you how to use "have" in the future, present, and past perfect. Plus, we will discuss the positive and negative use of "do" as an auxiliary verb". Whew! There's a lot of material here, so make sure you do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/auxiliary-verbs-be-do-have/ to test your understanding. TRANSCRIPT My name's Ronnie and I'm going to teach you some grammar. It's kind of a... difficult grammar, but once you learn this overview of-dunh, dunh, dunh, dunh-"Auxiliary Verbs", English grammar is going to become easier for you, I hope. So, if you're just beginning to learn English grammar, oh, stay in there, you can do it. Yuri, this goes out to you in Salvador, Brazil. Let's keep going, man. We have three auxiliary verbs that we use in English: "be", "do", and "have". But the thing about the auxiliary verbs is that each auxiliary verb will tell us what kind of grammar we're going to use with it. So, let's look at the first one: "be". So, "be" in its form in the present tense is "am", "is", "are"; negative: "am not", "isn't", and "aren't". These are present. The past tense would be present... Or, no. The past tense in the positive is "was" and "were"; negative: "wasn't" and "weren't". So, how do we actually use this auxiliary verb? And the answer is: We use it in two forms of English grammar. The first one is progressive. So, if you have a progressive sentence, we have present progressive, past progressive, and future progressive. Every time we have a sentence in English with progressive, we know we're going to use the verb "to be". So, if our sentence is present progressive, we're going to use the present tense of the verb "to be", "is am are" with a verb with "ing". So, in English grammar, anything that's progressive or continuous is another word for the same grammar, it's always going to be an "ing" on the verb. The thing that changes and tells us the grammar is the verb "to be". Present is: "is", "am", "are", plus verb "ing", but the past, we're going to use the past tense: "was" and "were" plus verb "ing". So, progressive will always have a verb "ing". The thing that changes the tense of it is the verb "to be". We have future progressive or future continuous. In this one we're simply going to use the verb "will", so in this one we have "will be" plus verb "ing". For example: "I will be eating pizza." This tells us what's going to happen in the future. "I was eating pizza" was the past, and "I am eating pizza", something's happening now, that's present progressive. So, the progressive will always have the verb "to be", either past, present, or future, and it will always have an "ing" on the verb. Okay, cool. Let's get more complicated, okay? We have another structure in English grammar called passive. Now, passive voice basically you're taking the action from the person or the focus on the person, and we're putting it towards the activity. So, in a normal English sentence we would say: "I eat lunch", but in a passive sentence, we're taking away the subject and we're focusing on the action. So, with the passive voice we have future passive, present passive, and past passive. It goes along the same idea, is that the verb "to be" is going to tell us: Is it present? Or if it's past. When we use a passive sentence, we can only ever use the past participle of the verb, or the third step of the verb. So, passive will always be the verb "to be" plus the past participle. If it's present, it's: "is", "am", "are", plus PP, past participle. If it's past, it's "was" and "were" plus past participle. It's hard to say the past participle, so I'm going to say PP. I have to go PP. So, as an example, we say: "Lunch is eaten", present tense. "Lunch was eaten". I'm going to step away and let you check that out. Let your brain absorb it. Make some sentences using this and the verb "to be". If we used the future passive, I could say: "Lunch will be eaten", so again, when we're using the future, we use "will be", but we're going to use the past participle. Have you made some sentences? Do it now. Come on. Make some sentences. Go. Okay. So we've done the verb "to be". And hopefully it's beginning to make sense, because English grammar rarely makes sense. I'm going to make it make it make sense for you. So, the next one is the auxiliary verb "do". Now, this one's interesting because we only use it in the negative form in the simple present, or we use it in the negative simple past. […]
Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes - Present, Past, Future | Simple, Continuous, Perfect
 
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Learn all of the 12 tenses in English easily in this lesson. This lesson features simple explanations, lots of example sentences and illustrations. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 5. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 1521360 Learn English Lab
Basic Sentence Structure
 
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Basic Sentence Structure
Views: 1847777 englishfuntime
Correct Use of WILL and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs WILL and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 See CONDITIONALS lessons here: https://goo.gl/YvhnwK For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: ‘Will’ and ‘would’. These two verbs cause a lot of confusion for English learners. So, in this video, I’m going to clear up that confusion for you. I will teach you the difference between these two modal verbs, and I’ll show you how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end to test your understanding. Alright, there are three main differences between ‘will’ and ‘would’. Let’s start with the most basic use of the two verbs. We use the verb ‘will’ to talk about the future. One very common use is to make a prediction, or say what we expect to happen in the future. Take this sentence: We will be in Hong Kong by 8 pm tomorrow. That means, we are traveling to Hong Kong and I expect that if our flight is on time, we will be there by 8 o’ clock tomorrow night. This next sentence also talks about the future but it’s a little different. I’m not hungry, so I will just have an orange juice. Imagine that you’re sitting in a restaurant with a friend and you say this. Here, you’re not talking about the distant future, you’re talking about the immediate future. In other words, here ‘will’ is used to express a decision that you have made. We also use ‘will’ to make a promise to someone: I’ll send you all the details by email. So, I’m promising to do something for you. OK, so that’s ‘will’. What about ‘would’? Well, ‘would’ is simply the past tense form of ‘will’. So imagine that we didn’t reach Hong Kong by 8 pm. Our flight was late. We only reached there at 2 in the morning. So then, we might look back at the past and say: We thought we would be in Hong Kong by 8 pm. But that didn’t happen. We often use ‘would’ when we report a past conversation – that is, we say what someone said in the past. For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense. And the last sentence becomes: She said she would send me all the details by email. OK, now you know the basic use of ‘will’ and ‘would’. So let’s look at a more challenging use of these two verbs. This is the area of most confusion for people, and it is conditionals. That means sentences where you have a condition and a result. For example: If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella. That’s pretty easy. You see that I’m talking about something I will do in the future (“I’ll bring my umbrella”), but only on one condition – “if it rains.” Here’s another one: If Jared stops playing video games, his grades will improve. What do you understand by that? Well, it means that Jared probably spends a lot of time playing video games, so his grades are not very good. But if he stops playing video games, then he can spend more time studying, and we expect that his grades will improve. In both of these sentences, we’ve used ‘will’. And that is because both of these are real situations (these are both possible). This type of sentence is called the first conditional. But sometimes, we want to talk about imaginary or unreal situations. For example: If I had wings, I would fly all over the world. Obviously, this is not possible. I can’t grow wings, so all I’m doing is I’m using my imagination. Notice that we have used the past tense throughout this sentence – ‘If I had wings,’ – ‘I would fly’. We’re not talking about the past, but this past tense, including ‘would’, just shows that this is not real – it’s imaginary. Now, let’s go back to Jared and his video game addiction. What if I said: If Jared stopped playing video games, his grades would improve. It’s similar to the sentence with ‘will’, but using the past tense (with ‘would’) just shows that I don’t think this is possible. Jared is not going to stop, he’s just going to keep playing video games, and his grades are never going to improve. Remember, with ‘will’ it’s possible, with ‘would’ it’s not possible, it’s imaginary. And this type of sentence is called the second conditional. But there’s one more – the third conditional. This is used to talk about past conditions. Imagine that Jared had his exam, and as we expected, his grades were poor. So then we can say: If Jared had stopped playing video games, his grades would have improved. So here, we’re talking about a condition in the past. Notice that we say ‘had stopped’ (this is the past perfect tense) in the condition, and we use ‘would have’ in the result.
Views: 535370 Learn English Lab
How to use "Be supposed to" - English grammar
 
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This week we show you how to use "Be supposed to"! Like our lessons? Help us make future lessons by supporting us on http://www.patreon.com/papateachme Subscribe and comment below! We love hearing from you! :)
Would के सभी Concepts अासानी से सीखें, Use & Examples in Hindi: Modal Verbs Would in English Grammar
 
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Would के सभी Concepts बडे आराम से सीखेंगे, मेरा वादा है....Use & Examples in Hindi: Modal Verbs Would in English Grammar.... Used to/Would video: https://youtu.be/vRHU3Ui01ig Hang Hung Video: https://youtu.be/QArU1ZkbPJ8 Ain't Video: https://youtu.be/8BnLkWisKLk?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5jCZrLMal3-d4Al5yHwYD7&t=7 Breath Breathe Sigh Video: https://youtu.be/Msn3d_zolpU?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5jCZrLMal3-d4Al5yHwYD7 Conditional Sentences Video: https://youtu.be/HwKARnadyE0 Please watch all the videos in sequence from playlist 1 to 14: Playlist 1: "Introduction & Basics of English" Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox569k1T00UH7zdw0ZETatLz Playlist 2: Simple Sentences' Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4xqm9T72J1D6I2IqLG4cJr Playlist 3: Tenses' Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4evkxrt2AnfXpndrYtEo5Q Playlist 4: Modal Helping Verb Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6FoHE30D7mAk5DylqVR81O Playlist 5: Prepositions' Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5sd3o3RZE9HJcZ_crRvBYG Playlist 6: Conjunctions' Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5cy2xkIQknyfyd9PSxR3JY Playlist 7: Vocabulary & Daily Sentences' Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5WZDOosR7ihWooeFwnT8Hf Playlist 8: Pronunciation & Sound Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4CdWX12bGL396YGeIEhqiS Playlist 9: "Do You Know Module" Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5jCZrLMal3-d4Al5yHwYD7 Playlist 10: Active & Passive Voice Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7M4w-k72XtRwP5OlZEXT_j Playlist 11: Question-Answer Test Video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6AvA4NUZyNCpfMXIXwDSNq Playlist 12: Advance English Topics' video Lectures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox53AvjielYUoRlaO_cuBDQb Playlist 13: Be Being Been - Concept, Practice, Test https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5o2yrhbITHJ1T2RbuImFDn Playlist 14: English Conversations (अंग्रेजी में वार्तालाप) https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5BU_Hkqwp7v7UdW9X5_-rh
Views: 999938 Spoken English Guru
Basic English Grammar - "Was" and "Were"
 
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http://www.engvid.com When to use WAS and when to use WERE. Learn about the past tense of TO BE -- the most important verb in English! I talk about normal sentences, negatives, and questions. I cover the grammar, but also the correct pronunciation. After you've watched the lesson, test yourself at http://www.engvid.com/was-were/#quiz!
Using   I, me, my, mine, and myself correctly – English Grammar Lesson
 
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Using I, me, my, mine, and myself correctly – English Grammar Lesson. Take the quiz - http://www.learnex.in/using-i-me-my-mine-and-myself-correctly If you’re confused by the words I, me, my, mine, and myself, you’re not alone! In this lesson, you will learn the difference between them and when to use the right one. I and ME I is the subject – the person who does the action in the sentence. Only use “I” when you are referring to yourself in the subject of the sentence. In other words, you are the one taking action. I gave John the book. Me is the object – the person who receives the action in the sentence. The pronoun “me” should be used when someone else will perform the action to, or for, you. John gave me the book. OR: John gave the book to me. When there are more than one subject or object people do get a little confused , so we will see how to use it correctly John and I saw Jane at the party. John = subject I = subject Jane= object The teacher called Jim and me. The teacher = subject Jim = object me = object MY and MINE Use my before the word, and use mine after the word. Remember my is always followed by noun where as mine replaces the noun. John is my friend. John is a friend of mine. Those are my glasses. Those glasses are mine. MYSELF The pronoun “myself” should only be used when you are performing the action on yourself. No one else can do anything to yourself. The word myself is used in two cases: When you do something to yourself Eg) I accidentally cut myself with the knife. For emphasis - when you want to emphasize the “I” Eg) I baked this cake myself! BY MYSELF The expression by myself means alone: I went out to dinner by myself.
English Grammar: The Prepositions ON, AT, IN, BY
 
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English for Beginners: Prepositions are short words that help us express location, time, and other relationships between people and things. Some examples of prepositions are: on, at, in, and by. Do you know how to use them? For example, do we say, "I am on a taxi" or "in a taxi"? Do you like to travel "in a plane" or "by plane"? After watching this simple but useful lesson, you will know exactly which preposition to use in any situation. Test yourself with our quiz: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-prepositions-on-at-in-by/ TRANSCRIPT I'm having a hard time reading on the train right now. Unh. Hold on. I'll start the lesson. Hi. James from engVid. Sorry, I was on the train. I want to teach you a lesson about four basic prepositions that we use in English that sometimes get confused, and I understand why, so I'll keep it basic. But because it's basic, it's going to be 80% correct. That's a good thing, that means you can go to the website and learn more from other lessons we have. But just know that sometimes there'll be exceptions, and I may not cover it here today. I'll even give you two exceptions to help you, but why waste time? Let's go to the board. Here's Mr. E. You'll notice he has a calendar, he has a clock, and: "You are here"? Oh, here. "Here" is a location. We're here right now, doing a lesson. That's the location: engVid. Let's go to the board and do the rest of the lesson, shall we? Here's: "at", "on", "in", and "by". "At". I love it because it's very specific, so you always know where you are, exactly. Problem: For transportation, "at" doesn't have anything. Hmm. So let's go to the next one. Let's go to "on". On. "On" is used for, let's say, large vehicles or large ways of travelling, such as buses... Sorry. Trains, buses, planes, and boats. I'll come back to boat in a second; it's an exception. On the train, on the bus, and on the plane, unless you're Bill Gates, Donald Trump, or me-I'm not in that list-you don't have your own train, plane, or bus, so you usually share it with a bunch of people or a few people. It's large. So we say: "You're on the bus", because it covers a big area, so there are many people sitting in that area. When I get to location, you'll see what I mean. Boat is a small exception. For many people in the world, they have their own boats because maybe they do fishing, or rowing, which is a type of boat that you go by yourself. In that situation, you can use "in". So, if the boat is small enough, say: "in": "I'm in a boat right now." But if it's a big boat, you have to say: "I'm on a boat." Another exception for the "on" rule is bicycle. You're always "on" a bicycle. I know, I said big vehicles, but remember: a bicycle is small, and it doesn't really have a motor or an engine, so we kind of give it its own thing, because you have to sit on the bicycle, and you can never really be in a bicycle. Is that good? Now, let's go to "in". "In" is funny because there are only two things for "in". "In" we use for car and taxi. The easy way to think about it is usually you own your own car; it doesn't belong to a group of people. People just don't get on your car every time you stop it, they go in and say: "Take me somewhere." And a taxi, well, when you're in a taxi, it is kind of your car. You pay the driver and you keep the car. So, this is one of those few cases where, because it belongs to me, I am in my car or I am in the taxi, because the taxi belongs to me as long as I pay the money. It's one of these funny exceptions. I don't know why, because you can put more people in a car, but I guess because you can actually own this transportation, it's yours. Think of it like the small boat. The small boat, one person is in it, you can be inside of it. All right? Cool. The last one we're going to do is "by". This is how you get there. So, "by" is different. When we talk about "in" and "on", you are... We are talking about how you are in the vehicle. Are you sitting on the bicycle? I can see you on it? You know, a boat is on water. But "by" just means: How did you get here? So, when someone responds to you with: "By car", "by plane", they're telling you how they got here. Not if they're in the plane, or on the plane. They are just... That's how they got there. So, how did I get here to do this video? Wouldn't you like to know. I'm kidding. I came here by car. So, yes, I was in my car and drove here, but I would tell somebody: "I got here by car, not by bus", and that would tell them the difference in the transportation I took. "How did you get here?" You like that? Good, so that's "by", this is how you did it; and the way you travelled is here, "in" and "on". Remember there is a small exception for small vehicles, so a small boat you can be in. Remember small. And a bicycle, you're always on the bicycle, because people see you sitting on it. We good? Excellent. Now, that is the lesson for transportation.
How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson
 
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How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. • Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided. • Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g There are many problems in her class (incorrect) Her class is facing many problems. (Correct) There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect) The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct) • Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting. Students think literature is very hard. Students think literature is difficult. • Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete. He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb) My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)
English Tenses Exercise - Grammar Practice
 
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This English exercise video will allow you to practise all the tenses in the English language. Let us know how you did. Join my complete self-study programme to reach all your English language goals: https://anglo-link.com Revision Lesson: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84jVz0D-KkY A-F 105 Main Tenses: http://tinyurl.com/cpz58ar Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Enjoy!
Views: 871231 Anglo-Link
Learn Telephone English - 100 Sentences You Can Use on the Phone | How to Talk on the Phone
 
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Learn 100 useful sentences that you can use on the phone. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Full list of sentences: MAKING A CALL INTRODUCTION (FORMAL) Hi / Hello. This is (your name) from (company name). Ex: This is Ganesh from ZoomFin Financial Services. My name is (your name). I’m calling from (company name). Ex: Hello, my name is Ganesh. I’m calling from ZoomFin Financial services. INTRODUCTION (INFORMAL) Hi / Hey. It’s (your name). Ex: Hey Annie, it’s Ganesh. How’s it going? How are you? Good, thanks. Great, thanks. What about you? What’s up? Not much. The usual. ASKING FOR SOMEONE (FORMAL) May I speak to (person’s name)? Ex: May I speak to Douglas Adams? Could I speak with (person’s name), please? Ex: Could I speak with Mary Smith, please? I’d like to speak to (person’s name), please? Ex: I’d like to speak to Vijay Kumar, please. Could you put me through to technical support, please? ASKING FOR SOMEONE (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) Is Doug there? Is Mary around? Can I talk to Vijay? PURPOSE OF THE CALL (FORMAL) I’m calling to ask about… Ex: I’m calling to ask about your software consulting services. Could you tell me…? Ex: Could you tell me how much it costs? PURPOSE OF THE CALL (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) I just wanted to ask… Ex: I just wanted to ask if you’re free to meet sometime this week. ASKING WHEN SOMEONE WILL BE AVAILABLE When would be a good time to call? When will he be back? Do you know when she’ll be back? LEAVING A MESSAGE Could you take a message for him? I’d like to leave her a message. Please ask her to call me back. Could you ask him to call me back? Please tell him that I’m in town. Please let her know that I would like to meet her. TAKING A CALL Good morning/Good afternoon. (Company name), (your name) speaking. Thank you for calling (company name). This is (your name). How may I help you? What can I do for you today? Ex: Good afternoon. ZoomFin Financial Services. Ganesh speaking. How may I help you? Ex: Thank you for calling ZoomFin Financial Services. This is Ganesh. What can I do for you today? ASKING WHO’S CALLING Could I ask who’s calling? May I ask who’s calling? Who’s calling, please? Where are you calling from, please? TELLING THE CALLER TO WAIT (FORMAL) Please hold. Let me transfer you. I’ll put you through now. I’m connecting you now. TELLING THE CALLER TO WAIT (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) Just a moment Hold on. Hang on a second. SAYING SOMEONE ISN’T AVAILABLE (FORMAL) I’m sorry, he’s on another call right now. I’m sorry, she’s not here today. I’m afraid he’s not available at the moment. I’m afraid she’s left for the day. He’s not in his office right now. SAYING SOMEONE ISN’T AVAILABLE (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) She’s out of town. He’s not home right now. She isn’t back from work yet. He’s gone to the movies with his friends. TAKING A MESSAGE Can I take a message? Would you like to leave a message? I’ll give her your message as soon as she gets back. I’ll ask him to call you as soon as he gets back. I’ll let her know that you called. MISDIALED CALLS I’m sorry, there’s nobody here by that name. I think you’ve dialed the wrong number. ASKING FOR INFORMATION Would you happen to know…? Ex: Would you happen to know when the conference takes place? Can you give me…? Ex: Can you give me a tentative date? Can I have…? Ex: Can I have your name and number, please? CHECKING INFORMATION Could you spell that for me? Let me read that back to you. HAVING DIFFICULTY WITH A CALL (FORMAL) Sorry, I can’t hear you very well. Could you speak a little more loudly, please? Could you speak up a little? Would you mind speaking a little more slowly? Could you repeat that? Could I call you back, please? It looks like we have a bad connection. HAVING DIFFICULTY WITH A CALL (INFORMAL) I didn’t catch what you just said. I’m sorry, what was that? Can you say that again? Can I call you back? Sorry, you’re breaking up. MAKING ARRANGEMENTS How about (day/date)? Ex: How about next Friday? Would (day/date) work for you? Ex: Would tomorrow work for you? Shall we say (day/date)? Ex: Shall we say September 12? ASKING FOR SUGGESTIONS/PREFERENCES What would you suggest? What would you prefer? Do you have a place in mind? MAKING REQUESTS Could you send me the details by email, please? Would you mind calling back tomorrow? RESPONDING TO A REQUEST Yes, I’d be happy to. Sure, no problem. I’ll email you the details right away. Sorry. I can’t do that. I’m afraid I don’t have that information. I’ll have to get back to you on that. ENDING THE CALL (FORMAL) It was nice talking to you. Thank you for your help. Thank you for your time. Thanks for calling. Have a nice day. ENDING THE CALL (INFORMAL) Anyway, I should get going. Take care. You too. Talk to you later. Bye.
Views: 366623 Learn English Lab
Place of Adverbs in English Sentences - Sentence Structure
 
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Not sure where to put adverbs like sometimes, currently, all, only, also, already, no longer, still, etc.? In this lesson, we’re going to review where these small but important words usually go in a sentence. We’ll end the lesson with an exercise to reinforce what you have learned. Check out my self-study platform: https://anglo-link.com
Views: 20880 Anglo-Link
Basic English Grammar - Do, Does, Did, Don't, Doesn't, Didn't
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ DO is a very simple verb in English, that is used *all the time*. In this simple grammar lesson, I explain how to use it easily and without confusion.
Prepositions of PLACE  👉  IN / ON / AT / BY  👈  Common English Grammar Mistakes
 
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English prepositions: These tiny words are so important! But they can be a little confusing at times too, right? In this video, Emma explains how to use them when giving information about PLACE. Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/10/03/prepositions-of-place-in-on-at-by/ *I recommend* ⭐️Speak with native teachers... 30mins every day! Get a free 14-day trial here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO! Do your friends a favour and help to translate this lesson into your native language! Contribute subtitles translations here: https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=XzkbcWh8s4w mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRiVfHqBIIvSgKmgnSY66g?sub_confirmation=1 Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 1647571 mmmEnglish
Has, Have, Had का सही Use | Learn English Grammar Tenses in Hindi | Full Video by Awal
 
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हिन्दी द्वारा सीखो Has, Have, Had का सही इस्तेमाल. Learn Use of Has, Have, Had in English through Hindi video by Awal. Learn English Grammar concepts of Present Perfect Tense, Past Perfect Tense explained by Awal in an interesting way, using simple language and easy examples. This video is helpful to all people who want to learn English grammar in Hindi. This video provides step by step explanation of English auxiliary verb (also called as a Helping Verb) "Have" and its forms, with examples in Hindi. This video also covers "Have" as a Main Verb and its various uses. In English grammar, Has, Have, Had is the most confusing concept because it stands in between the main tenses of past, present and future. In this video, Awal has also described the sentence structure and the form of verb to be used in such sentences, and what is the difference between present perfect, past perfect and simple past tense through this full course video of Has, Have and Had. If you are looking for low level details on how to use Has, Have, Had, this video is for you as a beginner. For advanced students, this video is very helpful because it includes the topic of "Has Had, Have Had, Had Had". If you want to understand the basics of English grammar to speak English fluently and confidently, this video with help you to remember these grammar rules during English conversation. This English tutorial is helpful for Indians, Pakistanis, and others who can understand Hindi or Urdu. Watch other videos of Awal through this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jbEcSuEoR4&list=PLR2GOVaoHO5_GDOua3C_QmA1oN93QTGvN Follow Awal on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnEnglishWithAwal https://www.youtube.com/TSMadaan is a Hindi Life Changing Videos Channel founded by Ts Madaan to raise your Success and Happiness level on various subjects like motivation inspiration and self help plus personality development. This channel also shows health videos and English Videos by various trainers.
Views: 3090673 TsMadaan