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Search results “Writing scientific research articles strategies and steps”
How to Write a Scientific Research Paper- part 1 of 3
 
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This is a (sometimes) tongue-in-cheek look at how to write a scientific research paper that is given as part of a graduate student seminar at Oklahoma State University. The talk outlines a step-by-step process that, if followed and practiced, minimizes the pain and suffering of writing a journal article.
Views: 93758 kridnix
How to Write a Paper in a Weekend (By Prof. Pete Carr)
 
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In this video, Prof. Carr (faculty member at the University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry) is explaining the Algorithm of writing a paper in a weekend.
Writing the Literature Review (Part One): Step-by-Step Tutorial for Graduate Students
 
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Take the mystery out of this academic assignment. All you do is: (1) Gather the summaries of your sources. (2) Put the summaries in groups based on theme. (4) Write a paragraph on each group of sources with transitions between each source. 4. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs. You're done! For examples of previously written literature reviews, see: http://libguides.uwf.edu/c.php?g=215199&p=1420828
Views: 1088670 David Taylor
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
How to Read, Take Notes On and Understand Journal Articles | Essay Tips
 
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The first pilot to my Essay Tips series! I share my method for reading and understanding a journal article or paper quickly and efficiently including how to take good, concise notes and remember useful citations. If your method differs from mine or you think you can give me some pointers then let me know in the comments! This is the first in a series of videos I'm hoping to produce while undertaking my PhD at the University of Exeter on tips for students at university or college whether undergraduate, postgraduate or otherwise. Note: The programme to the left (which I highlight in) is Mendeley. Apologies for forgetting to state this in the video!! If you've enjoyed this video then please do check out the rest of my channel. I generally put out new videos every Tuesday and Friday discussing theatre and playwriting from the perspective of an aspirant and (some might say) emerging playwright, theatre maker and academic. My tagging system was borrowed from this article on The Thesis Whisperer: https://thesiswhisperer.com/2015/10/28/how-evernote-can-help-you-with-your-literature-review/ Further Reading The Academic Skills Handbook by Diana Hopkins and Tom Reid US: https://amzn.to/2NBDAnf UK: https://amzn.to/2NBJIfb The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell US: https://amzn.to/2NDeIvh UK: https://amzn.to/2OTyneu [The above are affiliate links. I receive a small kickback from anything you buy which, in turn, helps to support the channel.]
Views: 62641 Tom Nicholas
How to write a literature review
 
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How to write a literature review. It’s easier than you might think! In this video, I demonstrate how to search the literature and identify relevant papers for your literature review. I do a pubmed search using Boolean operators and MeSH terms (these are extremely powerful tools that will help you sift through the large number of academic papers out there). So if you’re doing a master’s thesis or a PhD, or you’re doing research and writing a paper, at some point, you’ll need to do a lit review. A big part of that review is the search and this video is going to help you get that right. You might be doing a systematic literature review or meta-analysis – again, you’ll need to do a good PubMed search that identifies the right studies. Thanks to BMC !!! ----------------------------- This video was sponsored by BMC – (click here to go to BMC: https://goo.gl/RFaUA2 ). As a pioneer of open access publishing, BMC has an evolving portfolio of high-quality peer-reviewed journals including broad interest titles such as BMC Biology and BMC Medicine, specialist journals such as Malaria Journal and Microbiome, and the BMC series. BMC is committed to continual innovation to better support the needs of research communities, ensuring the integrity of the research we publish, and championing the benefits of open research. BMC is part of Springer Nature, giving us greater opportunities to help authors connect and advance discoveries across the world. I’m particularly excited about having BMC’s support because I’ve been working with them for nearly 15 years as the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Globalization and Health. I’ve been extremely impressed by them as a company that has integrity and that is truly making the world a better place. LEARN MORE about literature reviews ------------------------------------------------------------ Of course, there is more to a literature review than just the search. You need to have a structured approach to selecting paper, extracting data, writing the review itself and creating a bibliography. For more detail on these aspects of a literature review, go to www.learnmore365.com where I have a full course on literature review (it takes about 30 minutes to complete). About this channel ------------------------------ This channel posts global health and public health teaching videos and videos about how to find the right job in global health. If you haven't already, please consider subscribing to this channel and becoming part of this community. SUBSCRIBE: -------------------- Click here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=YourChannelNameHere LETS CONNECT: --------------------------- Twitter: @drgregmartin Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drgregmartin/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thisweekinglobalhealth/ SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL ----------------------------------------- Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/drgregmartin
Conducting a Systematic Literature Review
 
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The distinction between a systematic literature review and a literature review can often be confusing. This video distinguishes between the two and summarizes the process involved in conducting a systematic literature review in the context of a major research paper. This video features the song Little Candle by Stefan Kartenberg featuring Admiral Bob available under a Creative Commons license at http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/JeffSpeed68/55222. The music has been modified to fit the length of this video.
Views: 48596 Research Shorts
Reading RESEARCH PAPERS Doesn’t Have to be Hard
 
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Here's how you can read research papers and articles as quickly and efficiently as possible, regardless of whether they are for class or writing your own papers. Support the channel and become a Patron! Earn exclusive perks. Visit https://patreon.com/medschoolinsiders 00:39 Determine the importance of reading the paper 01:43 Don't read the paper in order 02:48 Understand significance and limitations 04:43 Organize your notes and thoughts 05:44 Proficiency in research is a long term game =============== Connect with me! WEBSITE: https://medschoolinsiders.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/MedInsiders FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/medschoolinsiders INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/medschoolinsiders AMAZON STORE: https://www.amazon.com/shop/medschoolinsiders =============== Music: http://soundcloud.com/iamryanlittle May include affiliate links to Amazon. As an Amazon Associate, I may earn a commission on qualifying purchases made through them (at no extra cost to you). Disclaimer: Content of this video is my opinion and does not constitute medical advice. The content and associated links provide general information for general educational purposes only. Use of this information is strictly at your own risk. Kevin Jubbal, M.D. and Med School Insiders LLC will not assume any liability for direct or indirect losses or damages that may result from the use of information contained in this video including but not limited to economic loss, injury, illness or death.
Views: 19152 Med School Insiders
How To Read a Scientific Research Paper: Extracting the Essentials
 
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Abstract PhD students or researchers starting a new research project or initiating work in an unfamiliar research direction often undertake a scientific literature search in order to inform themselves with respect to a chosen topic. This start-up phase involves wading through and reading scores, if not hundreds, of research papers that have already been published in the area of interest. Reading a large quantity of scientific papers and capturing the essential information from them is a very challenging task. Furthermore, this difficulty only increases with the passage of time as the complexity of literature increases as well as the quantity of publications. This lecture aims to instruct a starting PhD candidate or researcher on how to read a scientific research paper. By “read” we mean extracting the essential, most important information from a (previously) published scientific conference or journal paper. During the course of a PhD, the candidate will read many research papers containing a vast amount of information. However, it is not possible to remember all of the details presented, nor is it necessary. Here we identify and describe the essential knowledge that is best extracted and summarized when reading a research paper. Robert S. Laramee, How to Read a Visualization Research Paper: Extracting the Essentials, IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (IEEE CG&A), Vol. 31, No. 3, May/June 2011, pages 78-82 PDF http://cs.swan.ac.uk/~csbob/research/how2read/laramee09how2read.pdf DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MCG.2011.44 Connect with DataVis Bob on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/datavisbob Here is a version of the talk with slides: https://youtu.be/Q7ruNLUEMFg And yet another one with slides: https://youtu.be/IUlHgORKyQE
Views: 13019 DataVisBob Laramee
How to Write Essays and Research Papers More Quickly
 
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Check out Brilliant.org to start learning for free - and be among the first 200 people who sign up to get 20% off your subscription: https://brilliant.org/ThomasFrank Huge thanks to Brilliant for sponsoring this video! Writing essays takes a ton of time - to say nothing of all the extra time you spend in the research phase, as well as editing each draft to make sure you didn't make any typos or accidentally paste in your work-in-progress Inuyasha fan fiction. Today we'll go over some strategies that can help you make the entire process of writing that essay or research paper go a whole lot quicker. My book "10 Steps to Earning Awesome Grades" is completely free, so check it out if you're interested in improving your grades! http://collegeinfogeek.com/get-better-grades/ A Beginner's Guide to Library Research: https://collegeinfogeek.com/library-research-guide/ Check out our latest podcast episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Szpd970XXEY Connect with me: Twitter ➔ https://twitter.com/tomfrankly Instagram ➔ https://instagram.com/tomfrankly ---------- Videos you might want to watch next: How to Take Faster Notes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uL_YjcGoszo 7 Tips for Reading More Books: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiNISuM4wl0 ---------- If you want to get even more strategies and tips on becoming a more productive, successful student, subscribe to my channel right here: http://buff.ly/1vQP5ar Background music by Broke for Free: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/ Extension for better control over playback speed (if I'm talking too fast) ➔ https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/video-speed-controller/nffaoalbilbmmfgbnbgppjihopabppdk?hl=en ~ created by Thomas Frank
Views: 181740 Thomas Frank
Efficient reading strategies
 
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Discover how you can employ reading strategies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of your weekly reading for university.
Papers & Essays: Crash Course Study Skills #9
 
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Writing research papers is an essential skill in your career as a student, and this week we’re going to help you do that like a pro. From figuring out where to begin, to finding the best systems, to breaking out of “research recursion system” (maybe just figuring out what that means), we’ve got you covered. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/catalog/desktop.html Resources: How to Write a Great Research Paper by Simon Peyton Jones: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3dkRsTqdDA How to Become a Straight-A Student by Cal Newport: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/253203.How_to_Become_a_Straight_A_Student Close Reading and Research: https://collegeinfogeek.com/writing-close-reading-research/ Writing and Editing Tips: https://collegeinfogeek.com/essay-writing-and-editing/ *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Bob Kunz, mark austin, William McGraw, Ruth Perez, Jason A Saslow, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Eric Prestemon, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, Thomas Frank, Rachel Bright, Khaled El Shalakany, Ian Dundore, Tim Curwick, Ken Penttinen, Indika Siriwardena, Alexander Tamas, Caleb Weeks, Kathrin Janßen, Nathan Taylor, Andrei Krishkevich, Brian Thomas Gossett, Chris Peters, Kathy & Tim Philip, Mayumi Maeda, Eric Kitchen, SR Foxley, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Tom Trval, Cami Wilson, Justin Zingsheim, Moritz Schmidt, Jessica Wode, Daniel Baulig, Jirat -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 229529 CrashCourse
Writing Skills: The Paragraph
 
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http://www.engvid.com The paragraph is the most important unit of a well-written essay. The paragraph has a specific structure and standards that make it effective and enjoyable to read. In this writing lesson we will look at how to construct good paragraphs and improve writing with better flow and clarity. After the lesson, take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-skills-paragraph/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about the paragraph. It's a writing lesson, and I want to show people what a paragraph is and how to construct one, what to do, what not to do so you can write very clear, very tight paragraphs. This is especially important for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students but everybody has to follow the exact same rules. Now before I even begin, I must say that I'm talking mostly about academic writing or even business writing. Creative writing like novels or short stories, anything fiction, you can do anything you want. Only always remember: somebody has to read what you wrote so it has to be clear. But academic essays, for example, certain rules you have to follow; you have to be very careful about them. So let's begin. In terms of like the actual way a paragraph looks: you have to indent or skip a line. So let me just make sure you understand what an indent is. This is an indent, the first line a little bit pushed in or you can make sure you skip a line between paragraphs. But don't do both. If you skip a line, don't indent. Okay? That's the main thing. Now, that's in terms of the way it looks. In terms of content -- and this, I can't stress this enough -- very, very, very important: one central idea in one paragraph. Okay? I've seen many people, I've seen many essays where you start a paragraph talking about one thing, and then you go off on a tangent and talk about something completely unrelated. So for example: if you start a paragraph and you're talking about apples, continue to talk about apples. If you go to oranges, that's maybe okay because you're still talking about fruit. But if you start with apples, go to oranges, go to bananas, and then end up with monkeys in space there's a bit of a problem; the reader has no idea what you're talking about. One paragraph, one central idea. Now, make sure that you tell the reader what this central idea is. This is your thesis statement. Okay? It's a very general sentence. All it does is introduce the topic of the paragraph, nothing else. All the details comes after. So speaking of details, we'll talk about details in detail, but all other ideas, all the other sentences, all your sentences with the details must directly relate back to the main idea. So let's say here is your thesis statement; very general, every sentence after must relate back to that thesis statement. Okay? You can't go off to another idea. Everything must support this, must talk about the same topic. Very important. Okay? How long should your paragraph be? Technically, a paragraph could be one sentence, but in an academic essay that rarely happens. But it could be any length you want, as long as you're still on that one topic, as long as you still have things to write and things to say about that topic, say it. If you have four sentences, fine; if you have 10 sentences, also okay. Again, for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students: four, five sentences should be your limit. You can't be too long because you don't have time and you're going to start making mistakes. So now, the details. Very important to have lots of details. Why is this topic important to your overall idea of your essay? Not only tell me what is the topic, what is the thesis statement of the paragraph, make sure you explain to me why this is important to the general idea of the essay. Give me your reasons. Now, why is it important? And then reasons, why you think what you're saying supports this idea. Examples, always use examples because giving me the reasons is okay; examples make me see exactly what you're trying to say. Very easy for me to understand what you're trying to say. Now, in terms of flow, in terms of the way the reader can approach the paragraph, you have to have bridges. What is, what do bridges mean? Basically, when you have one idea in this sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence. Every sentence must have a link to the next sentence. This creates flow, makes it much easier to read and understand, and it keeps you on the one topic. Now, key terms. If you're talking about something specific and you have to use a key term, use it as many times as you need to. Otherwise, avoid repetition. Try not to use the same word more than once in one paragraph. Okay? For example: if you're using the word "moreover" in the paragraph, don't use it, don't use "moreover" again -- use "in addition to", use "furthermore", "another", etc. Try to avoid using one word more than once, especially in the same paragraph.
Lecture - Scientific writing
 
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Second part of the scientific writing seminar where Douwe van Hinsbergen (PGP, University of Oslo) discusses: 1. how to review scientific literature 2. how to structure a paper 3. publication strategy: how to increase your H-factor
Views: 7237 pgpuio
How to Read and Comprehend Scientific Research Articles
 
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This tutorial will discuss how to read a scientific article, how to find the main points of the article, and how to take effective notes.
Views: 103144 umnLibraries
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
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It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 496859 DiveIn Learning
How to Write an Argumentative Essay - Planning
 
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Introducing the British Council’s How to Write an Argumentative Essay animated video series. This is the first of five simple and easy to follow videos that will show you how you can improve your writing. We will look at: • Planning and question analysis • Writing a paragraph • Introduction and conclusion • Counter paragraph • Editing The British Council is committed to sharing our expertise in English language learning. This series is a comprehensive online tuition guide, taking you through all the key elements you need for a good piece of argumentative essay writing. This series is particularly relevant to secondary school students struggling with their English curriculum. For more information on our courses, check out our website http://www.britishcouncil.sg/english/courses-secondary or use our other free resources at learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org. Alternatively, to speak to one of our customer service advisors, please contact us at: Napier Road Centre +65 6653 6042 Marsiling Centre +65 6653 6044 Tampines Centre +65 6653 6063 Toa Payoh Centre +65 6653 6045 You can also follow us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/BritishCouncilSingapore), or Twitter (@sgBritish). Enjoy the videos!
Views: 435993 britishcouncilsg
How to write a good essay
 
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How to write an essay- brief essays and use the principles to expand to longer essays/ even a thesis you might also wish to check the video on Interview technique (now on this channel too!)
Views: 3303668 zontulfilmsltd
How To Write A Research Paper Fast -  Research Paper Writing Tips
 
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Please watch: "7 Lazy Weight Loss Hacks That Actually Work - Amazing Weight Loss Transformations" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5X2mLHybGS0 --~-- http://www.waysandhow.com Subscribe to Waysandhow: https://goo.gl/RK2SbN Research paper writing tips, step by step tutorial and tips on how to write a research paper fast. Through the course of school, and sometimes your career, you have to write a research paper at one time or another. Usually you know enough about what to write; however, writing is seldom anyone's favorite way to spend time. In the pileup of work, writing often sinks to the bottom of priorities. At crunch time, you then need to double up in your efforts to make the deadline. Only the knowledge of how to write a research paper fast can save you. Waysandhow. ---------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Google+: https://plus.google.com/+waysandhow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/waysandhow/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/waysandhow/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/waysandhow
Views: 518488 WaysAndHow
Writing a research proposal
 
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Writing a research proposal
Views: 622909 DrSamFiala
Thesis Statements: Four Steps to a Great Essay | 60second Recap®
 
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Thesis Statements: Four Steps to a Great Essay, using an example from "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne | Excerpt from "How to Write an A+ Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide" by Jenny Sawyer. http://goo.gl/SpJhCS 0:01 Writing the thesis statement. Overview. 0:19 What you must do BEFORE you begin writing your thesis statement, 0:26 Sample assignment: from "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne 0:37 Writing the thesis statement: Step One. Answer the question 1:08 Writing the thesis statement: Step Two. Refine your answer 2:10 Writing the thesis statement: Step Three. Choose the right supporting examples. 3:20 Writing the thesis statement: Step Four. Go Deeper! 3:40 Review of the sample assignment and the finalized thesis statement 4:07 Review of the four steps to a great thesis statement. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "How to Write an A+ Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide to Acing Your Next Assignment" by Jenny Sawyer. At Amazon's Kindle Store... http://goo.gl/xobJFo WRITE AN A+ ESSAY: IT'S EASIER THAN YOU MIGHT THINK. I'm going to make a confession. I was a straight-A student in high school. I graduated summa cum laude from college. My senior thesis won the institution’s coveted essay-writing prize. Not thanks to raw brilliance, or dazzling talent. No, I knew how to write essays. You see, great essays aren’t necessarily written by the “best and brightest.” They're written by students who know the rules—from concept to thesis statement, from outline to final draft. Students who know how to get the best possible grade for the least amount of work. I’ll show you how you can, too. A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO CONQUERING YOUR NEXT ESSAY ASSIGNMENT My name is Jenny Sawyer. Over the past five years, I’ve been the girl behind 60second Recap®. I've invested thousands of hours helping teens understand classic literature. I’ve answered countless emails seeking help with essay assignments. I’ve guided individual students, one-on-one, through the process of crafting thesis statements and writing essays, testing and refining the techniques I used when I was in school. Strategies I employed to nail essay after essay. Most people think A+ essays require hours of hard work. Or genius. I’d always had a hunch they’d thought wrong. Now, I'm certain of it: YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A GENIUS TO WRITE AN A+ ESSAY I’ve read mediocre essays from brilliant students. Great essays from ordinary students. What sets those A+ essay-writing students apart? They know how to analyze the assignment to keep themselves on track. I’ll show you how you can, too. YOU DON’T NEED LONG HOURS TO WRITE AN A+ ESSAY The best essays rarely take the most time. In fact, some nearly write themselves. How? With the right kind of preparation: A+ essay-writing students organize their research and cut their workload by as much as half. I’ll show you how you can, too. FORMULAS ARE NEVER THE ANSWER, BUT... A+ essays are never formulaic. But they have a lot in commont. A+ essays start strong with crisp, provocative thesis statements. A+ essays support those thesis statements with well-chosen examples and tightly-reasoned arguments—the hallmarks of persuasive writing. A+ essays finish strong, with conclusions that locked the reader into agreement with the essay’s thesis. A+ essays are written by students working from a simple framework: the five-paragraph essay format. I’ll show you how you can, too. DON’T BE INTIMIDATED: IT’S A HEAD GAME, YOU KNOW Ready to supercharge your essay-writing process? You can when you “think like a prosecutor.” I'll show you how. I’ll also reveal the courtroom “trick” you can use to save yourself time and trouble while you craft a great thesis statement. You'll see how you can use the strategies of a criminal trial to speed you through each step of the essay-writing process, from the organization of your research, to the writing of your thesis statement, to the polish of your final draft. It’s the first time I’ve ever set this strategy to paper. Now it’s all here for you, just a click away. YOUR A+ AWAITS. CLICK THIS LINK http://goo.gl/xobJFo AND GRAB YOUR COPY OF MY STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ESSAY MASTERY
Views: 744637 60second Recap®
5 Tips For Writing An Awesome Blog Post
 
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Writing blog posts aren't hard. Follow these tactics and you can write an amazing blog post, fast. Subscribe here to learn more of my secret SEO tips: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=neilvkpatel Find me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neilkpatel/ Read more on my blog: https://neilpatel.com/blog/ Step #1: Take your time writing your first few blog posts - this will help you figure out what your readers like, your writing style, and the overall flow. Once you figure out your style you can templatize your blog posts. For example, mine are introduction, body, and conclusion. You also want to use headings, headings will make your content easier to read and skim. Within your headings, add keywords. Step #2: Add images - using services like Fotolia you can add images to every one of your blog posts. By adding images it makes your content easier to understand as some people are visual learners. Step #3: Set some rules - by following these rules it will make it easier to write blog posts faster. Make sure you use the words "you" and "I" within your blog. Add 7 or so images per post and keep your paragraphs shorter than 5 or 6 lines.
Views: 112554 Neil Patel
How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Logical Structure
 
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https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 830996 Kevin deLaplante
Tips for writing journal article summaries
 
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NOTE: This video is aimed at students working on one specific "journal article summary" assignment in my classes. So others may find it helpful, but please always keep in mind that different instructors will want different things in your work. Suggestions on how to write cohesive, succinct summaries. This includes advice on what information to include and what to omit, and information about common mistakes that students frequently make on this assignment.
Views: 72147 Rachelle Tannenbaum
How I take notes - Tips for neat and efficient note taking | Studytee
 
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Open for FAQ and everything included! Hello everyone! Here’s the long awaited updated version of how I take notes! This technique has saved me this semester as I don’t have to write separate lecture notes and textbook notes, and I hope it can help you as well! ☺️ I’ve been on a little break from social media these last few weeks, just to focus on my studies, family and friends. I’m finally seeing the end of exam season (only 1 exam to go!), and Christmas is finally around the corner. I hope everything is going well for all of you who have finals at the moment, and I wish everyone who celebrate all the best for the holiday season! ❤️ Small tip; if you don’t already follow my Instagram, you should check it out! I post updates quite frequently there, so you’ll know when there will be a new video. Anyway, I hope you’re all well. Take care ❤️ Studytee xx STATIONERY INCLUDED: - Notepad: EMO college grid paper (generic brand from a local bookstore) - Pens: pilot frixion 0.5mm needle point - Coloured pens: uniball signo erasable pens - Thicker pens: pilot frixion color pens - Ruler: staples - «Eraser»: pilot friction eraser - Sticky notes: Clas Ohlson FAQ (will not be answered in comments): Which grade are you in? - I’m in my first year of university, studying medical technology! How old are you/where do you live/what's your name? - I’m Therese, 21 years old from Norway (please check my IG FAQ before commenting something rude regarding my age! Thank you) Can you send me your notes, or do you sell them? - I post some of my notes on Instagram, and other than that I don't share/sell them, I'm sorry! SOCIAL MEDIA AND CONTACT INFORMATION: My instagram: instagram.com/studytee For business enquiries: [email protected] (Non-business enquiries will not be answered on this mail address. If you'd like to ask me a question or send me a message then please send me a DM on instagram!) OTHERS: Music: Music by https://soundcloud.com/lakeyinspired and https://soundcloud.com/ikson Camera used: canon eos m3 with 40mm lense I edit my videos using iMovie, and my thumbnails are made in Canva!
Views: 2216676 studytee
How to Read a Paper Efficiently (By Prof. Pete Carr)
 
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In this video, Prof. Pete Carr (faculty member at the University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry) shares an algorithm to read a scientific paper more efficiently. One might start reading the paper in the order in which it is written, for example, title, abstract, introduction, etc., however, there is a more efficient method to extract the most information from the article, in the least amount of time.
The 9 BEST Scientific Study Tips
 
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Ace any exam with these study tips! How To Learn Faster: https://youtu.be/B9SptdjpJBQ 7 Exam Anxiety Tips: https://youtu.be/FyBdA61GmJ0 Check out TD http://td.com/student SUBSCRIBE (it's free): http://bit.ly/asapsci GET THE ASAPSCIENCE BOOK: http://asapscience.com/book/ Written by Amanda Edward, Gregory Brown and Mitchell Moffit FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Further Reading: [1] http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052970204644504576653004073453880 [2] http://ideas.time.com/2013/01/09/highlighting-is-a-waste-of-time-the-best- and-worst-learning-techniques/ [3] http://college.usatoday.com/2014/07/29/aiming-for-an-a-study-habits-you- should-adopt-and-avoid/ [4] http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/which-study- strategies-make-the-grade.html [5] http://www.csc.edu/learningcenter/study/studymethods.csc [6] http://www.educationcorner.com/habits-of-successful-students.html [7] http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/07/magazine/why-flunking-exams-is- actually-a-good-thing.html?_r=0 [8] http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/how-does-the-brain-learn- best-10-smart-studying-strategies/ [9] https://news.usc.edu/71969/studying-for-finals-let-classical-music-help/ [10] http://psych.wustl.edu/memory/nestojko/NestojkoBuiKornellBjork(2014).pdf [11] http://www.educationcorner.com/habits-of-successful-students.html
Views: 10048884 AsapSCIENCE
Research Methods - Introduction
 
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In this video, Dr Greg Martin provides an introduction to research methods, methedology and study design. Specifically he takes a look at qualitative and quantitative research methods including case control studies, cohort studies, observational research etc. Global health (and public health) is truly multidisciplinary and leans on epidemiology, health economics, health policy, statistics, ethics, demography.... the list goes on and on. This YouTube channel is here to provide you with some teaching and information on these topics. I've also posted some videos on how to find work in the global health space and how to raise money or get a grant for your projects. Please feel free to leave comments and questions - I'll respond to all of them (we'll, I'll try to at least). Feel free to make suggestions as to future content for the channel. SUPPORT: —————- This channel has a crowd-funding campaign (please support if you find these videos useful). Here is the link: http://bit.ly/GH_support OTHER USEFUL LINKS: ———————— Channel page: http://bit.ly/GH_channel Subscribe: http://bit.ly/GH_subscribe Google+: http://bit.ly/GH_Google Twitter: @drgregmartin Facebook: http://bit.ly/GH_facebook HERE ARE SOME PLAYLISTS ——————————————- Finding work in Global Health: http://bit.ly/GH_working Epidemiology: http://bit.ly/GH_epi Global Health Ethics: http://bit.ly/GH_ethics Global Health Facts: http://bit.ly/GH_facts WANT CAREER ADVICE? ———————————— You can book time with Dr Greg Martin via Google Helpouts to get advice about finding work in the global health space. Here is the link: http://bit.ly/GH_career -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Know how interpret an epidemic curve?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SM4PN7Yg1s -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Taking Notes: Crash Course Study Skills #1
 
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The first step in honing your new study skills is to take better notes. This week Thomas will tell you everything you need to know to come to class prepared and find a note-taking system that will help you retain and review like a champ. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/catalog/desktop.html Resources: Study on computer vs. paper note-taking: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0956797614524581 Evernote: https://evernote.com/ OneNote: https://www.onenote.com/ Dropbox Paper: https://paper.dropbox.com Coggle (mind-mapping tool): https://coggle.it/ *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Les Aker, Bob Kunz, Mark Austin, William McGraw, Jeffrey Thompson, Ruth Perez, Jason A Saslow, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Eric Prestemon, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, Rachel Bright, Khaled El Shalakany, Ian Dundore, Tim Curwick, Ken Penttinen, Dominic Dos Santos, Indika Siriwardena, Caleb Weeks, Kathrin Janßen, Nathan Taylor, Andrei Krishkevich, Brian Thomas Gossett, Chris Peters, Kathy & Tim Philip, Mayumi Maeda, Eric Kitchen, SR Foxley, Tom Trval, Cami Wilson, Moritz Schmidt, Jessica Wode, Daniel Baulig, Jirat -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1057331 CrashCourse
Get Published! 6 Steps to Creating a Publication Strategy
 
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Presented by Dr Janet Salmons, Vision2Lead, United States, as a part of the Get Published! 6 Steps to Creating a Publication Strategy seminar 2 February 2017. View all resources here: http://bit.ly/2lkOoaD While publishing results is a critical next step after the completion of research, too often we take what comes without reflecting fully on the best options that fit our work and goals. We aren’t sure where to start, then see a call for papers and start working on an article. We see a call for book titles or chapters, and shoot off a proposal. We answer a friend’s request to contribute to the blog of a professional association. We create a social media presence and may be very active one month and silent when things get hectic. We all know how this story goes… Academic researchers and graduate students alike face such dilemmas. Even skilled writers can feel lost by the publication process, or get distracted by day-to-day activities. Sometimes even those who have successfully published articles or chapters still don’t feel that they had accomplished what they had hoped. While most graduate programs emphasise the need to publish, and most academic positions require publications, the space or help needed to think through the options is largely unavailable. As a result, Dr. Janet Salmons set about to develop some supportive solutions, including materials, webinars, and a course offered with Dr. Helen Kara. The next ‘Create Your Publication Strategy’ course runs from February 10 to March 31 and e/merge Africa members signed up for this webinar are eligible for a discount. The course, with small group discussion and feedback from Janet and Helen, is designed for scholars who have completed or are nearing completion of a doctoral degree. Performing careful reflection and systematic analysis is critical in order to make purposeful use of our research findings and the new knowledge we acquired. We call this process creating a publication strategy. A publication strategy should include carefully-defined goals, a purposeful timeline, and actionable steps for proposing and writing the kinds of pieces large or small that allow others to access what we’ve learned, produce impact, and propel our careers forward. Join this webinar to learn more about how to create a publication strategy.
Views: 68 e/merge Africa
How to write a good essay: Paraphrasing the question
 
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Do you sometimes struggle to begin writing an essay when taking an exam? Good news! There is an important writing skill that will help you improve your essay introductions. This technique is called "paraphrasing", and it means rewriting something using different words. In this lesson, I will teach you how to paraphrase successfully and how to change essay questions into your own words. These skills are very useful for university and high school students, as well as any students writing English proficiency exams like the TOEFL or IELTS. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-good-essay-paraphrasing-the-question/ WATCH NEXT: Essay Writing – 6 ways to compare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8WSzwBD7GQ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you something very important for if you're taking any type of test that has a writing component. So, if you are taking the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP, even just a university test, it can be any type of test, but if you're asked to write something like an essay or a paragraph, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a very important skill that will help improve your marks when it comes to writing on tests. So, let's get started. So, I have here an essay question. This question is actually... I've seen it on the IELTS. You know, you have similar types of questions on the TOEFL, sometimes in university. The question is this: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country. Do you agree or disagree?" Or maybe: "To what extent do you agree or disagree?" So, this is an example of a question you might be asked. Now, a problem a lot of students have is in their answer to this question. They see this, and they think: "Okay, education is the most important factor in the development of a country, yes, I agree." So then they... Or: "I disagree", and they start writing. And what do they write? Usually the very first thing students will write is this: "I agree that education is the single most important factor in the development of a country because..." So, what is the problem with this? Is there any problem to start off your essay with something like this, or to start off your answer? There's a big problem. So I want you to take a moment and think: "What could be the problem with starting your essay off with this sentence?" Okay, well, if you noticed, you have here the word: "education, education, is, is, the single most important, most important factor". If you notice, these are the same. They're the exact same, except for: "I agree that" and "because". The student, here, has used the exact same wording that is in the question. So, if you do this on the IELTS-and many students do this, same with on the TOEFL-you actually will lose marks, and same with in university, because you're not showing your abilities; you're just copying what somebody else has said or what the essay question is. So, in this video, I'm going to show you first off... First off, I'm going to tell you: Don't do this, don't copy. And I'm going to teach you ways in order to improve yourself and your answer by changing this wording. How can you change your introduction so it's different than what the question is? Okay? So, let's look at how to make these changes. Okay, so what we are going to do in order to change the question into a proper answer that doesn't just copy the question, is we are going to paraphrase. So, the word here is: "paraphrase". This might be a new word for you. What does it mean to paraphrase something? Well, when we paraphrase, it means we take a sentence that, you know... We take somebody else's sentence and we change it into our own words. Okay? So, we change the words of a sentence, we also change maybe the sentence structure, but we keep all the same meaning. Okay? So, the meaning from the sentence you copy, it stays the same, same meaning, but different words and different sentence structure. Okay? So it's in your words, but this other person's meaning. So, we are going to paraphrase this example of a question into our own words. So, first we're going to look at how to do that using vocabulary and synonyms. So, we have here the same question: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country." How can we put this into new words or our own words that keep the same meaning? Well, we can use synonyms. So, this might be a new word for you, too. A "synonym". "Synonyms" are words that have the same meaning, but are different words.
2. Being systematic
 
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This video outlines how to systematically search the academic literature on a topic as part of the 15 step Systematic Quantitative Literature Review method. Specifically, it goes through steps 1-5 including defining the topic, working out the research questions, what keywords to use, what databases to search and the criteria for inclusion and exclusion. It is the second in a series of four videos on the this method with more information available at https://www.griffith.edu.au/griffith-sciences/school-environment-science/research/systematic-quantitative-literature-review including videos, papers outlining the method, example datasets and the large number of papers already published using the method.
Views: 38876 Griffith University
Types of Case Study. Part 1 of 3 on Case Studies
 
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A lecture on case studies as a research strategy taken from a series on research methods and research design given to masters (graduate) students by Graham R Gibbs at the University of Huddersfield. This is part 1 of three, and deals with the different kinds of case studies and looks at some key examples from the social sciences such as single cases, community studies and organizations, institutions, events, roles and relationships as cases. Somer references on case studies Edwards, D. 1. A. (1998) Types of case study work: A conceptual framework for case-based research, Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 3 8(3), pp. 36-70. Gerring, John (2007) Case Study Research. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Gomm, R., Hammersley, M. & Foster, P. (eds) (2000) Case Study Method. London: Sage. Miles, A B, & Huberman, A.M. (1994) Qualitative data analysis. an expanded sourcebook, Sage. Robson, C. (1993) Real World Research, Oxford: Blackwell. Simons, H. (2009). Case study research in practice. London: SAGE. Stake, R. (1994) Case Studies, In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln Handbook of Qualitative Research, Sage. Swaborn, P (2010) Case Study Research, London: SAGE. Tight, M (2017) Understanding Case Study Research: Small Scale Research with Meaning. Thousand Oaks, CA; London;: SAGE. Thomas, Gary (2016) How to do your case study, 2nd Ed. London: SAGE Travers, M. (2013). Qualitative research through case studies. Thousand Oaks, CA;London;: SAGE. Wilson, S. L. (1995) Single case experimental designs. In G. M. Breakwell, S, Hammond & C. Fife-Shaw (Eds.), Research Method in Psychology, Sage. Yin, R. & (1998) The Abridged Version of Case Study Research: Design and Method. In: L. Bickman & D. J. Rog (Eds.), Handbook of Applied Social Research Methods. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage. pp 229 - 259. Yin, R. K (2014) Case Study Research: Design &Methods, 5th Ed, Sage. Yin, R. K. (2011) Applications of Case Study Research. 3rd Ed. London: Sage.
Views: 185332 Graham R Gibbs
Liz Tynan - Writing excellent scientific journal articles
 
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Workshop title: Writing excellent scientific journal articles Presented by: Liz Tynan Date: Thursday 12th February 2016 This workshop was held at James Cook University for ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies affiliated students. This workshop was designed to provide guidance and strategies for writing scientific journal articles using strong and effective academic language. The workshop examined the following: - Producing a research article (following IMRAD structure: Intro, methods, results, and discussion) - Making scientific concepts clear through critical thinking and robust writing skills - Exercises and group discussion for honing scientific writing abilities to a high standard Some exercises were adapted from: Margaret Cargill and Patrick O’Connor (2013). Writing Scientific Research Articles (second edition), West Sussex: Wiley-Blackburn. Presenter Dr Liz Tynan Liz is senior lecturer and co-ordinator research student academic support at the JCU Graduate Research School. She teaches academic writing and critical thinking skills to postgraduate students and has particular responsibility for convening the Skills for International Postgraduates (SKIP) program. She also has an adjunct senior lecturer appointment at the College of Arts, Society and Education. She is a former journalism academic with a background in both print and electronic media, and a speciality in science writing and editing. She has worked for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) as a reporter and subeditor, and was later Sydney correspondent for New Scientist. She is co-author of the Oxford University Press textbook Media and Journalism: New Approaches to Theory and Practice, now in its third edition. She is also co-author and co-ordinating editor of the OUP text, Communication for Business, released in October 2013. Her book Atomic Thunder: The Maralinga Story will be published by NewSouth Publishing in September 2016. More information on Liz Tynan: https://research.jcu.edu.au/portfolio/elizabeth.tynan/
Effective Writing for Scholarly Work
 
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Click here to bypass the introduction and begin the lecture: 4:15 Filmed at California Southern University in Irvine, California. Please visit http://www.calsouthern.edu/ Presenter: Kathleen Andrews, PhD Description: A nationally recognized expert in scholarly writing, Dr. Andrews will outline strategies and tips for improving your academic writing, from research techniques to evaluating sources, honing your argument, implementing critical writing conventions, and improving your editorial style. After the lecture, Dr. Andrews will offer a fun, interactive review session to help reinforce what you've learned, as well as allow you to identify your particular strengths and weaknesses. Bio: CalSouthern Faculty Mentor Dr. Kathleen Andrews is a nationally acclaimed expert in graduate-level writing and APA style. The editor of three academic journals, Andrews also has founded and directs an APA Learning Center and is a sought-after lecturer on the topic. A talented and experienced practitioner as well as a gifted educator, Dr. Andrews has developed life programs for pregnant addicts and has worked with business executives and their employees, helping them develop a variety of life skills, including communications and parenting techniques. Some of Dr. Andrews' other areas of interest include addiction recovery, organizational process improvement, and spirituality in the workplace and in therapy. This has been a presentation of the School of Behavioral Sciences at California Southern University. If you would like to receive a certificate of attendance for viewing this lecture, please visit: http://www.calsouthern.edu/attendance-certificate/
Views: 54887 CalSouthern PSYCHOLOGY
How to Find the Best Research Paper Topics
 
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Simple strategy for finding good research paper topics. You can search for the best topics electronically by using the Research Topic Finder (part of Paper Builder). It's found here: http://paperbuilder.net.
Views: 177099 John Earnshaw
Writing a Successful Scientific Abstract
 
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A well-organized abstract is key to getting your paper accepted for publication. Panel participants will share strategies and tips for writing an abstract that will increase your chances of getting accepted to a top-quality journal or conference. This presentation was delivered on April 12, 2017, as the third session in the Himmelfarb Library series, Updates in Scholarly Communication: Publishing, Impact, and Visibility.
How to Read a Research Paper
 
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Ever wondered how I consume research so fast? I'm going to describe the process i use to read lots of machine learning research papers fast and efficiently. It's basically a 3-pass approach, i'll go over the details and show you the extra resources I use to learn these advanced topics. You don't have to be a PhD, anyone can read research papers. It just takes practice and patience. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: http://www.arxiv-sanity.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/ https://www.elsevier.com/connect/infographic-how-to-read-a-scientific-paper https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-start-reading-research-papers-on-Machine-Learning https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/comments/6rj9r4/d_how_do_you_read_mathheavy_machine_learning/ https://machinelearningmastery.com/how-to-research-a-machine-learning-algorithm/ http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/03/how-seriously-read-scientific-paper Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive content!
Views: 206679 Siraj Raval
Getting Published: How to Write a Good Science Paper, by Dr. Chris Mack
 
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Publishing is an extremely important part of the process of science, and often an important part of the career of scientists and engineers. But to the early-career author (or student preparing their first publication), the peer-reviewed journal writing and publishing process can be intimidating, and possibly a bit mysterious. What are journal editors and reviewers looking for? What does it take to get your work published? Of course, the first place to start is by doing good research on an important topic. But you still have to write a good paper. This talk will focus on what it takes to get published, and in particular how to write a good science paper. I’ll share some of my secrets on writing a good paper (OK, they’re not really secrets, but these skills are not often taught in school). The good news is you don’t have to be a good writer to write a good paper. But you do have to be a careful and knowledgeable writer. With practice, you can become a good writer as well.
Views: 1493 CIAN Education
What are systematic reviews?
 
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Summary: This video explains why systematic reviews are important and how they are done. This includes an explanation of how the effects of interventions are compared in order to provide evidence. Attribution/credits: Prepared by the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Group, La Trobe University and generously support by Cochrane Australia. Written by Jack Nunn and Sophie Hill. cccrg.cochrane.org. Animation by Shakira Moss, Doodler Animation - doodler.com.au
Views: 115502 Cochrane
Writing a Research Paper at Dal, Part One
 
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This is tutorial explains many elements of the research process, including how to evaluate your sources, your subject, and your audience
Views: 547 DalhousieLibraries
How to Review a Manuscript
 
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Learn how to write a peer review. This video guides peer reviewers through the process of reviewing a scientific manuscript and writing a peer review. We’re going to walk you through three main elements of peer review: - being invited to review a manuscript - reading the manuscript, and - writing the peer review Read more at the PLOS Reviewer Center (http://reviewers.plos.org) ==When you're invited to review== First, let’s talk about what to do when you’re invited to review a manuscript. When you get an invitation, ask yourself three simple questions to help you decide whether to accept or decline: - Do you have the right expertise to comment on the manuscript? - Do you have enough time to do the review by the deadline? - Can you provide an objective review and are you free of any competing interests? You should only consider accepting the invitation if you can answer yes to all of these questions. ==When you read a manuscript== It’s a good idea to read the whole manuscript first. Then read through it again and focus on specific sections. Take lots of notes as you go and mark down specific sections and page numbers so you can keep track of the points you want to discuss. The first thing you should do is figure out what the manuscript is about. Do the authors identify the main question and key claims? These should be clearly stated in the introduction. The authors should also discuss related research and explain how the study fits into that context. Then look at the figures and tables along with the results. Do the results line up with what’s being shown? Make sure you also pay attention to the methods and study design. Are the methods appropriate? Does the study follow relevant reporting guidelines and meet ethical standards? Then read the conclusions: Are they supported by the data and results? ==When you write the review== When you’re ready to start writing, find out how the review needs to be formatted and submitted. Some journals might have a structured form with specific questions to respond to. You should also find out if you will need to recommend a decision, like minor or major revision. This information might be in your invitation letter, in the reviewer guidelines, or in the online system. Follow an outline to keep your comments organized and easy to read. Think about it like an upside-down triangle, with the key message at the top followed by evidence and examples, then additional details at the very bottom. Start off by summarizing the research in your own words and stating your overall impression. Then use the middle section to provide detail on what the authors need to do to improve the manuscript. Divide this section into major issues and minor issues. - Major issues are the essential things the authors must address before the manuscript is considered further. Make sure you focus on what is fundamental for the current study. In other words, it’s not helpful to recommend additional work that would be considered the “next step” in the study. - Minor issues are still important but are smaller in scope and don’t affect the overall conclusions. Use this section to mention things like including additional references, clarifying the language, or adding more context. Finally, add any confidential comments to share privately with the journal editors. This is where you might state if you have any competing interests. You can also raise concerns about ethics or misconduct, though in these cases it’s a good idea to get in touch with the journal staff directly as well. Follow us on Twitter! https://twitter.com/PLOS ==Credits== "Thinker" Flickr, bobistraveling Moby - "Sunspot" - www.mobygratis.com Adam Vitovsky - "The Stratosphere" - www.adamvitovsky.com
Views: 9512 PLOS Media
How ERIC Can Help You Write a Research Paper
 
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The tools available on the ERIC website at eric.ed.gov can help you find the articles you need to write an education-focused research paper. This video walks you through the process of writing a research paper using ERIC. Since there are multiple ways to navigate ERIC, we show various techniques to help you find high-quality resources on a topic. The video provides step-by-step instruction on how to narrow your topic, use search filters, and take advantage of the ERIC Thesaurus to target specific resources. The video also provides guidance on how to identify and select the most relevant and rigorous articles for your paper.
Views: 5715 SearchEduResources
How To Read a Scholarly Journal Article
 
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Recognize the structure of scholarly articles in order to use them most effectively in your research projects. With Tim Lockman, Kishwaukee College librarian.
5 Resume Mistakes You Need to Avoid
 
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The first 100 people to use this link will get 10% off their first domain name at Hover: https://hover.com/thomasfrank Big thanks to Hover for sponsoring this video! Your resume is a key tool for impressing recruiters and landing jobs, internships, and sometimes even scholarship. Yet people often make HUGE mistakes on them - mistakes that can land their resume in the trash. Today, we'll cover five of those mistakes, and I'll share tips and examples for how you can avoid them. If you're curious, here's my resume: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B98GpsX1yQlqNnNBRnBzNXZTYTQ/view You can also check out my personal website here: http://thomasjfrank.com/ My book "10 Steps to Earning Awesome Grades" is completely free, so check it out if you're interested in improving your grades! http://collegeinfogeek.com/get-better-grades/ Check out our latest podcast episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pp5LEbGwduA Read the companion article: https://collegeinfogeek.com/resume-mistakes-to-avoid/ Connect with me: Twitter ➔ https://twitter.com/tomfrankly Instagram ➔ https://instagram.com/tomfrankly ---------- Videos you might want to watch next: Why "Find Your Passion" is Bad Advice: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlosFuyuPpk How to Be More Confident Than Anyone You Know: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjB-JRU-_dY ---------- If you want to get even more strategies and tips on becoming a more productive, successful student, subscribe to my channel right here: http://buff.ly/1vQP5ar Background music by Broke for Free: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/ Extension for better control over playback speed (if I'm talking too fast) ➔ https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/video-speed-controller/nffaoalbilbmmfgbnbgppjihopabppdk?hl=en ~ created by Thomas Frank
Views: 462039 Thomas Frank
How to write a hook
 
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Learn how to write a hook (attention-getting intro) for an essay. Video includes 5 kinds of hooks: inverted pyramid, fact/statistic, anecdote/personal experience, rhetorical question, and bold pronouncement. Also included are 3 hooks to avoid. Twitter @mistersato411
Views: 673843 mistersato411